08-22-2019  2:12 pm   •   PDX Weather    •   SEA weather  
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NORTHWEST NEWS

New Hate Crime Law Kicks In

SB577 requires state to better track bias crimes

Mayor: Show Extra Love at Portland Businesses After Protests

The City of Portland and more are offering deals and free parking downtown this weekend in an effort to generate some of the revenue lost during last weekend's political protests

Community Leaders Heartened By Portland Response To Proud Boys Rally

Proud Boys outnumbered by counter-demonstrators in largely peaceful event

Black Man Told He Couldn't Enter Portland Bar Because of Jewelry Sues

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NEWS BRIEFS

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Portland Parks, Partners Host Charles Jordan Birthday Celebration

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Matt Dishman Community Center Annual Block Party

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Portland, Oregon police hire homeless liaison

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Firefighters rescue person stuck in septic tank for days

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Ex-Clemson star Kelly Bryant takes over at QB for Missouri

COLUMBIA, Mo. (AP) — Barry Odom never seems stressed about the future, whether the Missouri coach is pondering tough sanctions handed down by the NCAA over a recruiting scandal or the fact that one of the most prolific passers in school history is now in the NFL.When it comes to the...

Missouri DE Williams pleads to misdemeanor, put on probation

COLUMBIA, Mo. (AP) — Missouri defensive end Tre Williams pleaded guilty to a misdemeanor and was sentenced to two years of unsupervised probation after prosecutors dropped a felony domestic assault charge.The Columbia Daily Tribune reports Williams pleaded guilty to peace disturbance and was...

OPINION

Why I’m Visiting the Border

People of color are feeling less safe today and any day when we see the realities of domestic terrorism and racially-motivated acts of violence ...

Why Lady Liberty Weeps

The original concept was to have Lady Liberty holding a broken shackle and chain in her left hand, to commemorate the end of slavery in the United States. ...

Avel Gordly's Statement in Advance of Aug. 17 Rally

'All we have on this planet is one another' ...

A National Crisis: Surging Hate Crimes and White Supremacists

Our history chronicles the range of hate crimes that have taken the lives of Latinos as well as Native Americans, Blacks, Jews, and the LGBTQ community ...

AFRICAN AMERICANS IN THE NEWS

North Carolina man freed as prosecutors decline retrial

GREENVILLE, N.C. (AP) — A North Carolina man who spent 24 years in prison has been freed because prosecutors say they won't pursue a new trial against him.News outlets report a judge ordered a new trial Thursday for 44-year-old Dontae Sharpe, who was serving a murder sentence for a 1994...

Trump awarding Medal of Freedom to NBA star Bob Cousy

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump is to present basketball legend Bob Cousy with the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the nation's highest civilian honor, in an Oval Office ceremony on Thursday.Cousy, 91, played for the Boston Celtics from 1950 to 1963, winning six league championships...

Nebraska school pulls yearbook photos of teacher's baby

WAVERLY, Neb. (AP) — School administrators have halted distribution of a Nebraska high school yearbook in part because of a story that honors a journalism teacher for how she dealt with the death of her son only 96 minutes after his birth.The district objects to photos of the baby that...

ENTERTAINMENT

Review: Raphael Saadiq's history imbues stirring 'Jimmy Lee'

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Taylor Swift says she plans to re-record her songs' masters

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Once upon a time in fatherhood: Tarantino to become a dad

LOS ANGELES (AP) — Quentin Tarantino is going to be telling a whole new brand of "Once upon a time" tale — the bedtime-story kind.The "Once Upon a Time... In Hollywood" director is about to become a father.His representative Katherine Rowe says Tarantino and his wife, Israeli model...

U.S. & WORLD NEWS

Hundreds of mourners honor former Louisiana Gov. Blanco

BATON ROUGE, La. (AP) — A bagpiper played a somber "Amazing Grace" as Louisiana's first and only female...

Jewish groups speaking out against Trump immigration policy

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Italian populist mixes religious symbols with his politics

ROME (AP) — Matteo Salvini slipped the rosary out of his pocket right before Premier Giuseppe Conte began...

Amazon fires stir bitter dispute over who is to blame

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UK's Johnson presses for fresh Brexit talks in Paris

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Lightning strikes kill 5, injure over 100 in Tatra Mountains

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McMenamins
Thomas Watkins the Associated Press

LOS ANGELES (AP) -- The elaborate mission to recover a moon rock led NASA agents to one of the most down-to-earth places: a Denny's restaurant in Riverside County.

But at the end of the sting operation, agents were left holding a speck of lunar dust smaller than a grain of rice and a 74-year-old suspect who was terrified by armed officials.

Five months after NASA investigators and local agents swooped into the restaurant and hailed their operation as a cautionary tale for anyone trying to sell national treasure, no charges have been filed, NASA isn't talking and the case appears stalled.

The target, Joann Davis, a grandmother who says she was trying to raise money for her sick son, asserts the lunar material was rightfully hers, having been given to her space-engineer husband by Neil Armstrong in the 1970s.

"It's a very upsetting thing," Davis told The Associated Press. "It's very detrimental, very humiliating, all of it a lie."

The strange case centers on a speck of authenticated moon rock encased in an acrylic-looking dome that appears to be a paperweight. For years, NASA has gone after anyone selling lunar material gathered on the Apollo missions because it is considered government property, so cannot be sold for profit.

Still, NASA has given hundreds of lunar samples to nations, states and high-profile individuals but only on the understanding they remain government property. NASA's inspector general works to arrest anyone trying to sell them.

The case was triggered by Davis herself, according to a search warrant affidavit written by Norman Conley, an agent for the inspector general.

She emailed a NASA contractor May 10 trying to find a buyer for the rock, as well as a nickel-sized piece of the heat shield that protected the Apollo 11 space capsule as it returned to earth from the first successful manned mission to the moon in 1969.

"I've been searching the internet for months attempting to find a buyer," Davis wrote. "If you have any thoughts as to how I can proceed with the sale of these two items, please call."

Davis told AP the items were among many of the space-related heirlooms her husband left her when he died in 1986. She said she had worked as a lexicographer and he had worked as an engineer for North American Rockwell, which contracted for NASA during the Apollo era.

Davis claims Armstrong gave the items to her husband, though the affidavit says the first man on the moon has previously told investigators he never gave or sold lunar material to anyone.

In follow-up phone conversations with a NASA agent, Davis acknowledged the rock was not sellable on the open market and fretted about an agent knocking on her door and taking the material, which she was willing to sell for "big money underground."

"She must know that this is a questionable transaction because she used the term `black market,'" Agent Conley states in the search warrant.

Curiously, though, Davis agreed to sell the sample to NASA for a stellar $1.7 million. She said she wanted to leave her three children an inheritance and take care of her sick son.

NASA investigators then arranged the sting, where Conley met with Davis and her current husband at the Denny's at Lake Elsinore in Riverside County.

Soon after settling into a booth, Davis said, she pulled out the moon sample and about half a dozen sheriff's deputies and NASA investigators rushed into the eatery.

When officers in flack vests took a hold of her, the 4-foot-11 woman said she was so scared she lost control of her bladder and was taken outside to a parking lot, where she was questioned and detained for about two hours.

"They grabbed me and pulled me out of the booth," Davis claimed. "I had very, very deep bruises on my left side."

Conley declined to comment and NASA Office of the Inspector General spokeswoman Renee Juhans said she could not talk about an ongoing investigation.

Davis was eventually allowed home, without the moon rock, and was never booked into a police station or charged.

The affidavit states authorities believed Davis was in possession of stolen government property but so far they have not publicly revealed any proof.

"This (is) abhorrent behavior by the federal government to steal something from a retiree that was given to her," said Davis's attorney, Peter Schlueter, who is planning legal action.

Joseph Gutheinz, a University of Phoenix instructor and former NASA investigator who has spent years tracking down missing moon rocks, said prosecuting Davis could prove tricky.

Gutheinz said he recently learned that NASA did not always take good care of lunar materials. In some instances, space suits were simply hosed off and any moon dust on them lost forever.

While bigger rocks, such as those given to various countries and museums were carefully inventoried and tracked, it now appears there are unknown numbers of much smaller pieces circulating in the public. Some of these may have been turned into paperweights and informally given away by NASA engineers.

"I have a real moral problem with what's happened here in California," Gutheinz said. "I've always taken the position that no one should own an Apollo-era moon rock. They belong to the people. But if we did such a poor job of safeguarding (lunar samples,) I cannot fault that person."

About 2,200 samples of lunar rocks, core samples, pebbles, sand and dust - weighing about 840 pounds - were brought to Earth by NASA's Apollo lunar landing missions from 1969 to 1972. A recent count showed 10 states and more than 90 countries could not account for their shares of the gray rocks.

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Watkins can be reached at http://www.twitter.com/thomaswatkins

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