08-18-2019  6:28 pm   •   PDX Weather    •   SEA weather  
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NORTHWEST NEWS

At Least 13 Arrested During Far-Right Protests

Police said there were about 1,200 on the streets, but that number fell throughout the day. Six people suffered minor injuries

Six Arrests Send Message Ahead of Demonstrations

The Oath Keepers pull out but Patriot Prayer's Joey Gibson says: “we don't bend the knee; we show up ten-fold, one hundred-fold...Force them to arrest you for being peaceful."

Portland Mayor Decries Violence, Hatred Ahead of Rally

The mayor of Portland, Oregon, said Wednesday that people planning violence or espousing hatred at a weekend protest by right-wing groups in the liberal city "are not welcome here"

ACLU of Oregon to Sue ICE

Group sues after US citizen detained outside courthouse

NEWS BRIEFS

Study Finds Lack of Racial Diversity in Cancer Drug Clinical Trials

New research published this week in JAMA Oncology has found a lack of racial and ethnic diversity in clinical trials for cancer drugs ...

Portland Parks, Partners Host Charles Jordan Birthday Celebration

A celebration of the life of one of Portland’s most influential leaders, held at his namesake community center ...

Matt Dishman Community Center Annual Block Party

The event will feature free food, arts and crafts, family fun, live music and more ...

Sara Boone Sworn in as Fire Chief

Boone will be the first African American fire chief in the city’s history ...

Portland Holocaust and Genocide Curriculum Symposium

Oregon State University’s College of Education will host a symposium for educators who will soon be required to teach about the...

Man arrested after throwing furniture out of Portland window

PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) — Some residents were evacuated from their Oregon apartments because of a neighbor throwing furniture and other items out of his window.Portland police say Jerome Lee wasn't initially cooperative with officers Saturday night. Police say when they tried to talk to him, he...

Far-right and antifa groups both claim victory at Portland

PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) — With both the left and the right declaring victory following a long-hyped rally that had Portland, Oregon, on edge it seems the liberal city will continue to be a flashpoint in an increasingly divided country.City officials were mostly relieved that a downtown gathering...

Ex-Clemson star Kelly Bryant takes over at QB for Missouri

COLUMBIA, Mo. (AP) — Barry Odom never seems stressed about the future, whether the Missouri coach is pondering tough sanctions handed down by the NCAA over a recruiting scandal or the fact that one of the most prolific passers in school history is now in the NFL.When it comes to the...

Missouri DE Williams pleads to misdemeanor, put on probation

COLUMBIA, Mo. (AP) — Missouri defensive end Tre Williams pleaded guilty to a misdemeanor and was sentenced to two years of unsupervised probation after prosecutors dropped a felony domestic assault charge.The Columbia Daily Tribune reports Williams pleaded guilty to peace disturbance and was...

OPINION

Avel Gordly's Statement in Advance of Aug. 17 Rally

'All we have on this planet is one another' ...

A National Crisis: Surging Hate Crimes and White Supremacists

Our history chronicles the range of hate crimes that have taken the lives of Latinos as well as Native Americans, Blacks, Jews, and the LGBTQ community ...

Calling Out Racism, White Supremacy and White Nationalism is More Vital Than Ever

Telling the truth, in its entirety, is the most objective stance any journalist can take on any subject ...

A Dog for Every Kind of Hunting: The Hound

The hound, in particular, is considered an all-purpose dog for every kind of hunting, on all types of terrain. ...

AFRICAN AMERICANS IN THE NEWS

Sanders' criminal justice plan aims to cut prison population

COLUMBIA, S.C. (AP) — Democratic presidential candidate Bernie Sanders is proposing a criminal justice overhaul that aims to cut the nation's prison population in half, end mandatory minimum sentencing, ban private prisons and legalize marijuana. He says the current system does not fairly...

Sacramento files lawsuit to ban 7 men from business district

SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — The city of Sacramento has filed an unusual lawsuit to ban seven men considered to be a "public nuisance" from a popular business corridor.The lawsuit alleges the men are "drug users, trespassers, thieves ... and violent criminals" who have illegal weapons and...

Indiana lawmaker under fire for posting noose picture

INDIANAPOLIS (AP) — An Indiana lawmaker who posted nooses under a Facebook story about a black man pleading guilty to rape is drawing criticism for using racist imagery.Republican state Rep. Jim Lucas, from Seymour, posted a picture of a gallows with two nooses under a WISH-TV story about...

ENTERTAINMENT

Eataly severs ties with Mario Batali amid misconduct scandal

NEW YORK (AP) — Chef Mario Batali, whose career crumbled amid sexual misconduct allegations, no longer owns a stake in Eataly, the Italian marketplaces he once heavily promoted.Chris Giglio, a spokesman for Eataly USA, told The Associated Press on Friday the company has purchased Batali's...

With glut of festivals, hard to match Woodstock magic

NEW YORK (AP) — Fifty years after Woodstock, the mystical and messy event that gave birth to a myriad of musical festivals, the entertainment industry is diluted with festivals and events like it — some genre specific, some extremely diverse and others offering experiences in addition...

'Easy Rider' star, 1960s swashbuckler Peter Fonda dies at 79

LOS ANGELES (AP) — Actor Peter Fonda, the son of a Hollywood legend who became a movie star in his own right after both writing and starring in the counter-culture classic "Easy Rider," died Friday at his home of complications from lung cancer. He was 79."I am very sad," Jane Fonda said in a...

U.S. & WORLD NEWS

Funeral for lost ice: Iceland bids farewell to glacier

OKJOKULL GLACIER, Iceland (AP) — It was a funeral for ice.With poetry, moments of silence and political...

Trade war's losers could include microchips, energy, banks

NEW YORK (AP) — Looking across the stock market, it's hard to find a company that isn't vulnerable in some...

Trump dismisses worries of recession, says economy is strong

BERKELEY HEIGHTS, N.J. (AP) — President Donald Trump dismissed concerns of recession on Sunday and offered...

Funeral for lost ice: Iceland bids farewell to glacier

OKJOKULL GLACIER, Iceland (AP) — It was a funeral for ice.With poetry, moments of silence and political...

Restrictions continue in Kashmir despite security ease

NEW DELHI (AP) — Restrictions continued in much of Indian-administered Kashmir on Sunday, despite India's...

Tlaib declines to visit West Bank, citing Israeli conditions

JERUSALEM (AP) — Democratic Rep. Rashida Tlaib said Friday she would not visit her grandmother in the...

McMenamins
Brett Zongker the Associated Press

WASHINGTON (AP) -- For many who helped dedicate the new Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial on Sunday, the towering granite monument is a stark reminder that the civil rights leader's dream of social and economic justice has yet to be realized.

In many ways, the ceremony was a passing of the torch to a younger generation with speeches marked by fierce rhetoric over the nation's economic disparities.

Thousands gathered at the memorial site, some as early as 5 a.m., to hear President Barack Obama, King's children and other civil rights leaders. Speaker after speaker invoked King's "I Have a Dream" speech from 1963 to challenge others to carry on his fight.

"Yes, my father had a dream. It was a dream, he said, that was deeply embedded in the American dream," said King's son Martin Luther King III. "The problem is the American dream of 50 years ago ... has turned into a nightmare for millions" who have lost their jobs and homes.

The nation has "lost its soul," he said, when it tolerates such vast economic disparities, teen bullying, and having more people of color in prison than in college.

His sister, the Rev. Bernice King, reminded the crowd that just before her father's assassination in 1968, he was mobilizing a poor people's campaign to occupy the nation's capital until the economic system changed.

She said the postponement of an earlier dedication because of Hurricane Irene that was planned on Aug. 28, the 48th anniversary of her father's "Dream" speech, may have been an act of God.

"Perhaps the postponement was a divine interruption to remind us of a King that moved us beyond the dream of racial justice to the action and work of economic justice," she said. "Perhaps God wanted us to move beyond the `dream' into action."

Other speakers included union leaders, the Rev. Jesse Jackson and Andrew Young, the former Atlanta mayor and U.N. ambassador who was an aide to King. Young urged the crowd to vote for a president who has their interests at heart.

Actress Cicely Tyson said her contemporaries are passing the fight on to a new generation. She passed the microphone to 12-year-old Amandla Stenberg. The girl recalled learning about the civil rights movement in school and named four young girls killed in a 1963 church bombing in Birmingham, Ala.

"As Dr. King said at their funeral, `They didn't live long lives, but they lived meaningful lives,'" Amandla said. "I plan to live a meaningful life, too."

Some looked to Obama to carry on King's legacy.

Street vendors nearby sold framed photographs edited to depict King and the nation's first black president conversing together in the Oval Office, along with a wide swath of buttons, posters and other souvenirs showing King and Obama.

U.S. Rep. John Lewis of Georgia said Obama's election was "just a down payment" on King's dream. "We're not there yet," he said.

About 1.5 million people are estimated to have visited the memorial's 30-foot-tall statue of King and its granite walls where 14 of his quotations are carved in stone since it opened in August. The memorial is the first on the National Mall honoring a black leader.

The sculpture of King with his arms crossed appears to emerge from a stone extracted from a mountain. It was carved by Chinese artist Lei Yixin. The design was inspired by a line from the "Dream" speech: "Out of the mountain of despair, a stone of hope."

Obama, who was just 6 years old when King was assassinated, saluted the civil rights icon as a man who pushed the nation toward what it "ought" to be and who changed hearts and minds.

"He had faith in us," Obama said. "And that is why he belongs on this Mall: Because he saw what we might become."

"As tough as times may be, I know we will overcome," Obama said. "I know there are better days ahead."

The president, who credits King with paving his way to the White House, left a copy of his inaugural speech in a time capsule at the monument earlier in the day.

Many who crowded in to see the president and hear Aretha Franklin and Stevie Wonder sing chanted "four more years" when Obama arrived. And they said the talk of economic fairness resonated with their own lives.

Joyce Lansdown, 61, a retired federal worker from Chantilly, Va., brought her daughter and granddaughter to the ceremony. She was glad Obama and others mentioned the importance of caring for seniors during the economic downturn.

"My heart goes out to them," she said. "My momma is still living on her little Social Security check."

Patricia Johnson, 50, drove with her godfather's granddaughter from Twinsburg, Ohio, to see the president and King's family.

"It seems that President Obama as a young president is following King's footsteps," she said. "I think we can continue to learn a lot from (King's) example."

Her young family friend, 13-year-old Faron Bouldin, wiped tears from her eyes as a recording of King's full "Dream" speech played on large TV screens after Obama spoke.

"It feels really important for me," Bouldin said of King's message.

Some 10,000 chairs set up in a field near the memorial site were all filled. Many others stood in overflow sections.

The August ceremony when the memorial opened had been expected to draw 250,000, though organizers anticipated about 50,000 for Sunday's event.

Violinist Miri Ben-Ari performed an original composition written for the event and the song "Bus Passed" with spoken word artists Poem-Cees. Poet Nikki Giovanni read her poem "In the Spirit of Martin."

Wonder, Sheryl Crow and James Taylor performed in a concert after the dedication.

The Rev. Al Sharpton called for people from around the world to see the monument's "stone of hope."

"When you walk through, you see a man standing in a posture of faith," he said. "Faith that brought us from the back of the bus to the White House."

Before the dedication, the King siblings walked through the memorial plaza with Obama, first lady Michelle Obama, and their two daughters.

Bernice King said her family was proud to witness the memorial's dedication and hope it will spur action to solve the nation's problems.

Echoing her father's words, she told the crowd, "One day we'll all be able to say `Free at last, free at last, thank God almighty, we are all free at last."

---

Brett Zongker can be reached at http://www.twitter.com/DCArtBeat

© 2011 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed. Learn more about our Privacy Policy and Terms of Use.

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