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NORTHWEST NEWS

Black Portlanders Struggle to be Heard Amid Protests

The Portland Committee on Community-Engaged Policing Steering Committee will meet Tuesday, August 11, 2020 from 5:30 –7pm

Portland Protests Persist with Some Flashes of Violence

Tear gas was used by police on protesters Wednesday for the first time since the U.S. agents pulled back their presence

Reimagine Oregon Issues Equity Demands, Gains Legislative Support

Coalition of Black-led and Black-focused organizations takes new approach to concrete change 

Oregon Criminal Justice Commission: Initiative Petition 44 Will Nearly Eliminate Racial Disparities for Drug Arrests, Convictions

The initiative would expand access to drug addiction treatment and recovery services, and decriminalize low-level drug possession.

NEWS BRIEFS

Vote.org Holds #GoodTroublePledge Voter Registration Drive to Commemorate the 55th Anniversary of the Voting Rights Act

2020 VRA anniversary observance to honor the memory of voting rights activist and late-Congressman John Lewis (D-GA) ...

White Democrats in Congress Falling Short on Reparations Bill

Democracy in Color releases “The White List” showing 79% of democratic House members haven’t cosigned HR 40 despite popular...

New Rule by The U.S. Department of Education Would Misdirect $11M from Oregon Public Schools

U.S. Rep. Suzanne Bonamici, Sens. Ron Wyden and Jeff Merkley, and Reps. Peter DeFazio and Earl Blumenauer called a...

Barbara Bush Foundation Partners with Barbershop Books and Penguin to Provide Child-Friendly Reading Spaces in Baltimore and Detroit Barbershops

Developed in Harlem, Barbershop Books is a community-based program that leverages the cultural significance of barbershops in...

All Classical Portland Awards Grant to Support Emmanuel Henreid's 'Livin' in the Light'

Livin’ in the Light documents Onry’s experience as a Black, male, professional opera and crossover singer in Portland, Ore. ...

Riot swiftly declared for Portland protest at union building

PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) — A riot was again declared by authorities Sunday night in Portland when protesters marched to a police union building, blocked a road and set dumpster fires as officers work to quell nightly unrest in Oregon's largest city.The protest was broken up almost as soon as it...

Demonstrators gather ahead of Seattle police votes

SEATTLE (AP) — Demonstrators have started gathering in Seattle ahead of upcoming votes by city officials on reduced funding for police. Hundreds of people including pro-police supporters and counter-protesters assembled opposite city hall Sunday afternoon.The Seattle City Council last week...

LSU adds Missouri, Vanderbilt in revamped SEC schedule

Defending Southeastern Conference and national champion LSU will host Missouri and visit Vanderbilt in its expanded Southeastern Conference schedule, while Alabama will visit Mizzou and host Kentucky in league play revised by the coronavirus pandemic. The league on Friday released two additional...

Missouri's Drinkwitz takes side in mask-or-no-mask debate

COLUMBIA, Mo. (AP) — Eli Drinkwitz has been the head coach at Missouri for just over seven months. He has yet to lead the Tigers onto the football field, much less win a game, yet his role in the community already has forced him to take some important stands.First, it was supporting his new...

OPINION

US Reps Adams and DeFazio Call on Postmaster General to Resign

The legislators say Trump appointee Louis DeJoy is sabotaging the US Postal Service and could harm the election ...

Da 5 Bloods and America Abroad

Even before I returned to the United States from my combat tour in Vietnam, I had decided that we were fighting an unjust war. ...

Falling Behind: COVID, Climate Change, and Chaos

Multiple Crises, Multiple Obstacles ...

Bill Deiz urges Oregonians to Defend their Constitutional Rights

Elements of federal police, sent in by our president, are nightly tormenting our citizens with tear gas, impact munitions, kidnappings and beatings, and other criminal acts, in order to suppress our rights of free speech and free assembly ...

AFRICAN AMERICANS IN THE NEWS

The always intimate Theatre for One goes online

NEW YORK (AP) — The coronavirus hasn't stopped the world's smallest theater. “Theatre for One,” where one audience member sees one short play performed by a single actor in a portable theater, has now gone online.“The experience is unique to Theatre for One. And in that...

Why choice of running mate matters more than usual this year

NEW YORK (AP) — For all the secrecy and speculation that typically surrounds the search for a vice presidential candidate, the decision rarely sways an election. But ahead of Joe Biden's imminent announcement, this year could be different. At a minimum, the decision will shift the force of...

AP Was There: Watts riots erupt in Black LA neighborhood

LOS ANGELES (AP) — EDITOR’S NOTE: On Aug. 11, 1965, an uprising began in Los Angeles after the drunken driving arrest of a young Black man by a white California Highway Patrol officer.It was focused in the segregated Black neighborhood of Watts, where violence exploded in response to...

ENTERTAINMENT

Eminent scholar of early U.S., Bernard Bailyn, dies at 97

NEW YORK (AP) — Bernard Bailyn, a Pulitzer Prize-winning historian and educator of lasting influence whose “The Ideological Origins of the American Revolution” transformed how many thought about the country’s formation, has died at 97.Bailyn's wife, Lotte, told The...

Lorenzo Soria, president of Golden Globes group, dies at 68

LOS ANGELES (AP) — Lorenzo Soria, president of the Hollywood Foreign Press Association and former editor of the Italian news weekly L’Espresso, died Friday, the association said. He was 68.Soria died peacefully at his Los Angeles home, the association said in a statement, lauding his...

Reimagining ‘The Secret Garden’ for a new generation

Frances Hodgson Burnett’s children’s classic “ The Secret Garden ” has been adapted into several films, television series and even a Broadway musical. But it had been 27 years since Mary Lennox had last been committed to film and the time seemed ripe for another visit to...

U.S. & WORLD NEWS

Blast destroyed landmark 19th century palace in Beirut

BEIRUT (AP) — The 160-year-old palace withstood two world wars, the fall of the Ottoman Empire, the French...

Hong Kong media tycoon Jimmy Lai arrested, newsroom searched

HONG KONG (AP) — Hong Kong authorities broadened their enforcement of a new national security law on...

Belarus: Anger erupts over president's election to 6th term

MINSK, Belarus (AP) — Election officials in Belarus said Monday that President Alexander Lukashenko has won...

GOP senator subpoenas FBI over Russia, defends Biden probe

WASHINGTON (AP) — Republican Sen. Ron Johnson said Monday that he has subpoenaed the FBI to produce...

Court record in Colombia reveals Uribe's mounting legal bind

BOGOTA, Colombia (AP) — The frantic voice message to an inmate in Colombia’s notorious La Picota...

Pandemic wrecks global Class of 2020's hopes for first job

LONDON (AP) — British fashion school graduate Phoebe St. Leger’s dream of landing a job at a design...

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Brett Zongker the Associated Press

WASHINGTON (AP) -- For many who helped dedicate the new Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial on Sunday, the towering granite monument is a stark reminder that the civil rights leader's dream of social and economic justice has yet to be realized.

In many ways, the ceremony was a passing of the torch to a younger generation with speeches marked by fierce rhetoric over the nation's economic disparities.

Thousands gathered at the memorial site, some as early as 5 a.m., to hear President Barack Obama, King's children and other civil rights leaders. Speaker after speaker invoked King's "I Have a Dream" speech from 1963 to challenge others to carry on his fight.

"Yes, my father had a dream. It was a dream, he said, that was deeply embedded in the American dream," said King's son Martin Luther King III. "The problem is the American dream of 50 years ago ... has turned into a nightmare for millions" who have lost their jobs and homes.

The nation has "lost its soul," he said, when it tolerates such vast economic disparities, teen bullying, and having more people of color in prison than in college.

His sister, the Rev. Bernice King, reminded the crowd that just before her father's assassination in 1968, he was mobilizing a poor people's campaign to occupy the nation's capital until the economic system changed.

She said the postponement of an earlier dedication because of Hurricane Irene that was planned on Aug. 28, the 48th anniversary of her father's "Dream" speech, may have been an act of God.

"Perhaps the postponement was a divine interruption to remind us of a King that moved us beyond the dream of racial justice to the action and work of economic justice," she said. "Perhaps God wanted us to move beyond the `dream' into action."

Other speakers included union leaders, the Rev. Jesse Jackson and Andrew Young, the former Atlanta mayor and U.N. ambassador who was an aide to King. Young urged the crowd to vote for a president who has their interests at heart.

Actress Cicely Tyson said her contemporaries are passing the fight on to a new generation. She passed the microphone to 12-year-old Amandla Stenberg. The girl recalled learning about the civil rights movement in school and named four young girls killed in a 1963 church bombing in Birmingham, Ala.

"As Dr. King said at their funeral, `They didn't live long lives, but they lived meaningful lives,'" Amandla said. "I plan to live a meaningful life, too."

Some looked to Obama to carry on King's legacy.

Street vendors nearby sold framed photographs edited to depict King and the nation's first black president conversing together in the Oval Office, along with a wide swath of buttons, posters and other souvenirs showing King and Obama.

U.S. Rep. John Lewis of Georgia said Obama's election was "just a down payment" on King's dream. "We're not there yet," he said.

About 1.5 million people are estimated to have visited the memorial's 30-foot-tall statue of King and its granite walls where 14 of his quotations are carved in stone since it opened in August. The memorial is the first on the National Mall honoring a black leader.

The sculpture of King with his arms crossed appears to emerge from a stone extracted from a mountain. It was carved by Chinese artist Lei Yixin. The design was inspired by a line from the "Dream" speech: "Out of the mountain of despair, a stone of hope."

Obama, who was just 6 years old when King was assassinated, saluted the civil rights icon as a man who pushed the nation toward what it "ought" to be and who changed hearts and minds.

"He had faith in us," Obama said. "And that is why he belongs on this Mall: Because he saw what we might become."

"As tough as times may be, I know we will overcome," Obama said. "I know there are better days ahead."

The president, who credits King with paving his way to the White House, left a copy of his inaugural speech in a time capsule at the monument earlier in the day.

Many who crowded in to see the president and hear Aretha Franklin and Stevie Wonder sing chanted "four more years" when Obama arrived. And they said the talk of economic fairness resonated with their own lives.

Joyce Lansdown, 61, a retired federal worker from Chantilly, Va., brought her daughter and granddaughter to the ceremony. She was glad Obama and others mentioned the importance of caring for seniors during the economic downturn.

"My heart goes out to them," she said. "My momma is still living on her little Social Security check."

Patricia Johnson, 50, drove with her godfather's granddaughter from Twinsburg, Ohio, to see the president and King's family.

"It seems that President Obama as a young president is following King's footsteps," she said. "I think we can continue to learn a lot from (King's) example."

Her young family friend, 13-year-old Faron Bouldin, wiped tears from her eyes as a recording of King's full "Dream" speech played on large TV screens after Obama spoke.

"It feels really important for me," Bouldin said of King's message.

Some 10,000 chairs set up in a field near the memorial site were all filled. Many others stood in overflow sections.

The August ceremony when the memorial opened had been expected to draw 250,000, though organizers anticipated about 50,000 for Sunday's event.

Violinist Miri Ben-Ari performed an original composition written for the event and the song "Bus Passed" with spoken word artists Poem-Cees. Poet Nikki Giovanni read her poem "In the Spirit of Martin."

Wonder, Sheryl Crow and James Taylor performed in a concert after the dedication.

The Rev. Al Sharpton called for people from around the world to see the monument's "stone of hope."

"When you walk through, you see a man standing in a posture of faith," he said. "Faith that brought us from the back of the bus to the White House."

Before the dedication, the King siblings walked through the memorial plaza with Obama, first lady Michelle Obama, and their two daughters.

Bernice King said her family was proud to witness the memorial's dedication and hope it will spur action to solve the nation's problems.

Echoing her father's words, she told the crowd, "One day we'll all be able to say `Free at last, free at last, thank God almighty, we are all free at last."

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Brett Zongker can be reached at http://www.twitter.com/DCArtBeat

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