05-24-2018  7:12 am      •     
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NEWS BRIEFS

Mississippi Avenue Giving Tuesday

On Tuesday, May 22, 10 percent of proceeds from participating Mississippi Ave. businesses will go to SEI ...

Raina Croff to Speak at Architectural Heritage Center

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Peggy Houston-Shivers Presents Benefit Concert for Allen Temple CME

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Man gets 13 years for crashing motorhome into patrol cars

SALEM, Ore. (AP) — A Salem man pleaded guilty and was sentenced to more than 13 years in prison for assault against Salem police officers after leading police on a chase through Salem and ramming his motor home into officers in their patrol cars.The Statesman Journal reports 61-year-old Roy...

Woodburn officer gets 150 days in jail for child sex abuse

SALEM, Ore. (AP) — A former Woodburn police officer has been sentenced to 150 days in jail and five years of probation for having sex with an underage girl and soliciting sexual contact from the child online.The Statesman Journal reports that 29-year-old Daniel Kerbs was sentenced Wednesday....

Worker who died in fall at Sound Transit site identified

SEATTLE (AP) — Officials have identified the man who died after falling from a light rail column at a Sound Transit construction site in Bellevue.The Seattle Times reports 63-year-old Walter Burrows was a foreman and a longtime employee at Kiewit, the company building the elevated light rail...

Case of Legionnaires' disease suspected at UW Medical Center

SEATTLE (AP) — A case of Legionnaires' disease has been suspected at the University of Washington Medical Center.KOMO-TV reported Wednesday that this is the third time in as many years that the disease has been suspected at the facility.Officials said the patient "has been diagnosed with a...

OPINION

Racism After Graduation May Just Be What's on the Menu

Dr. Julianne Malveaux says that for our young millennials, racism is inevitable ...

Prime Minister Netanyahu Shows Limits of Israel’s Democracy

Bill Fletcher, Jr. on racial politics in Israel and Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu’s uneven treatment of African immigrants ...

Golfing While Black Is Not a Crime

Grandview Golf Club asks five Black women to leave for golfing too slow ...

Discovering the Best of Black America in 2018

Dr. Benjamin F. Chavis discusses the DTU Journalism Fellowship & Scholarship Program ...

AFRICAN AMERICANS IN THE NEWS

Bucks' Brown decries 'police intimidation' during arrest

MILWAUKEE (AP) — The Milwaukee police chief has apologized to Sterling Brown and says officers have been disciplined for acting "inappropriately" after the Bucks player was zapped with a stun gun during his arrest for a parking violation in January.Brown, who is African-American, said in a...

George Zimmerman tells court he's [scripts/homepage/home.php].5 million in debt

SANFORD, Fla. (AP) — The ex-neighborhood watch volunteer who killed a black teen in Florida in 2012 says he's [scripts/homepage/home.php].5 million in debt and has no income.George Zimmerman filed paperwork detailing his financial state as he fights a misdemeanor stalking charge.The Orlando Sentinel reports a public...

Senate primary splits Arizona conservatives between 2 icons

SCOTTSDALE, Arizona (AP) — Former Maricopa County Sheriff Joe Arpaio was asking dozens of tea party activists for their backing in Arizona's Republican Senate primary when one audience member said it was a shame disgruntled conservatives couldn't send "both of you" to Washington.The man...

ENTERTAINMENT

In taking on 'Solo,' Ehrenreich faced an unenviable task

LOS ANGELES (AP) — Thandie Newton jokes that there might be something off about Alden Ehrenreich — because how else could he take on the pressure-filled role of Han Solo with so much ease?"Every week, I was expecting a call that Alden had had a nervous breakdown and wouldn't be coming...

Rockwell work at center of controversy gets M at auction

PITTSFIELD, Mass. (AP) — One of the two Norman Rockwell paintings at the center of a Massachusetts museum's contentious decision to sell 40 works of art has been sold at auction for more than million."Blacksmith's Boy — Heel and Toe," also known as "Shaftsbury Blacksmith Shop," was...

Michael Jackson estate slams ABC TV special on his last days

LOS ANGELES (AP) — The estate of Michael Jackson is objecting to an ABC TV special on the end of the King of Pop's life, calling it a crass attempt to exploit Jackson without respect for his legacy or children.The estate said in a statement to The Associated Press on Wednesday that "The Last...

U.S. & WORLD NEWS

AP PHOTOS: Then and now: France's World War I battle-scape

PARIS (AP) — U.S. troops fighting in France in World War I found a landscape ravaged by trench warfare and...

Bucks' Brown decries 'police intimidation' during arrest

MILWAUKEE (AP) — The Milwaukee police chief has apologized to Sterling Brown and says officers have been...

Feds: Uber self-driving SUV saw pedestrian but didn't brake

DETROIT (AP) — Federal investigators say the autonomous Uber SUV that struck and killed an Arizona...

North Korea demolishes nuclear site ahead of Trump summit

PUNGGYE-RI, North Korea (AP) — Just weeks ahead of a planned summit with U.S. President Donald Trump, Kim...

Spanish ruling party fined in major corruption case

MADRID (AP) — The conviction of more than two dozen Spanish businesspeople and officials in a major...

Investigators: Russian military missile downed Flight MH17

BUNNIK, Netherlands (AP) — Detailed analysis of video and photos has unequivocally established that the Buk...

Eddie Pells AP National Writer

NEW YORK (AP) -- Feeling wronged again at the U.S. Open, Serena Williams couldn't let it go.

 "That's totally not cool," she shouted at the umpire. Then, a few minutes later, she told her, "You're a hater, and you're just unattractive inside."

Problem was, the real trouble for Williams was standing on the other side of the court.

Sam Stosur pushed the 13-time Grand Slam champion all over Arthur Ashe Stadium on Sunday and took what she wanted, along with what the umpire gave her, winning the U.S. Open in a result that was as surprising for who won as how lopsided it was.

The ninth-seeded Australian won her first Grand Slam title with a 6-2, 6-3 dismantling of No. 28 Williams, the three-time U.S. Open champion who hadn't lost a set en route to the final.

She lost two quick ones to Stosur. And, for the second time in three years, Williams did not leave Flushing Meadows quietly.

This time, the drama began when Williams, down a set and facing break point in the first game of the second, flushed a forehand deep to Stosur's backhand side and screamed out `C'mon!' - figuring she had hit a shot that Stosur wouldn't reach. But Stosur stretched out and got a racket on the ball and the umpire, Eva Asderaki, called Williams for a hindrance, awarding the point, and thus the game, to Stosur.

What followed was nowhere near as menacing as 2009, when Williams berated and brandished her racket at a referee who called a foot fault in her semifinal against Kim Clijsters.

But memorable nonetheless.

Williams went over to talk to Asderaki, saying, "I'm not giving her that game," then, "I promise you, that's not cool. That's totally not cool."

The fans, sitting on their hands as they watched an unexpected first-set flattening of the American, got riled up and so did Williams, breaking Stosur's serve on the next game, then holding her own serve for a 2-1 lead.

But on the next changeover, Williams took things up again with Asderaki and she made it personal.

"You're out of control," she said. "You're a hater, and you're just unattractive inside."

Then, a few moments later: "You're out of control." And, "Really, don't even look at me."

And as quickly as she had gained the momentum and the support of the crowd, they were gone, leaving Williams to explain and deflect - and wait to hear if there will be further consequences.

Asderaki issued a code violation warning for verbal abuse and the U.S. Tennis Association said officials would decide Monday whether Williams would be fined.

"I don't even remember what I said," Williams said. "It was just so intense out there. It's the final for me, and I was just ... I guess I'll see it on YouTube."

What she'll also see, if she watches long enough, is a rare example of a player who doesn't feel beaten before she even walks onto the court against Williams.

That's Stosur, a one-time doubles specialist, who has revamped her game over the past several years and moved her way into the top 10 in singles.

She became the first Australian woman to win a major championship since Evonne Goolagong Cawley at Wimbledon in 1980. Stosur received a text from the former player that read: "Twinkletoes, you finally have got what you deserved."

It's been building for a while, now. Stosur was the French Open runner-up last year, though maybe the most notable stat on her ledger coming into the final was her 2-4 record against Williams - not bad, all things considered.

"I knew I had to go out there and play well and actually do it," Stosur said. "But I think having those victories in the past, for sure, made me feel a little bit more comfortable."

Almost from the get-go on a cloudy day in Ashe Stadium, where Queen Latifah led an emotional rendition of the national anthem to commemorate the 10th anniversary of the Sept. 11 attacks, Stosur looked like the more comfortable player.

Williams sprayed groundstrokes long and wide, raising her hands in frustration, and also had trouble harnessing her powerful first serve, getting only 29 of 56 of them in.

Stosur, meanwhile, moved Williams from side to side and forced her into mistakes. The Aussie had 20 winners and 12 unforced errors - a virtually unbeatable combination - while Williams hit 19 winners against 25 unforced errors.

While Williams was dealing with the emotion of the call and the rift with the umpire, she was also wondering if Stosur, who joins Li Na and Petra Kvitova as first-time Grand Slam winners this year, would come down to earth.

"I thought, OK, at some point you could level out, because I know sometimes it happens," Williams said. "But I've played a couple Grand Slam finals where I never leveled out, so I definitely thought about it."

As was the case with Clijsters two years ago, Stosur was a confused bystander when Williams got into it with the referee.

But as was the case with Clijsters, Stosur didn't need any help. Even Williams agreed with that.

"I hit a winner but I guess it didn't count," she said when asked about the call in her on-court interview. "It wouldn't have mattered in the end. Sam played really well."

Williams, who made this run after missing the better part of a year with injuries stemming from the night last summer when she stepped on broken glass in a restaurant, has had her shining moments at the U.S. Open. She won in 1999, 2002 and 2008.

But she has an equal penchant for memorable losses.

In 2004, a poor call during her quarterfinal loss to Jennifer Capriati was cited as a main reason for the introduction of replay technology in tennis. Then the Clijsters match. Now this.

"It's just always something," said Williams' mother, Oracene Price. "And it seems to happen to us."

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