03-20-2019  1:58 am      •     
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4

NEWS BRIEFS

OHSU Film Screening: No Más Bebés Documentary

On April 16, the OHSU Center for Women's Health and the OHSU Library will be screening the Emmy nominated health care reform...

Blumenauer Invites the Public to Discuss Prescription Drug Affordability

A public forum will be held Thursday, March 21 at 5:30 p.m. at Madison High School. ...

Colson Whitehead to Receive Stone Award at Oregon State

Pulitzer Prize winner to visit OSU campus April 1 to receive Stone Literary Award ...

AG Rosenblum Asks Oregon Legislature to Strengthen Hate Crime Laws

The proposed legislation would require law enforcement to refer all complaints of hate-motivated conduct that they do not investigate...

AG Rosenblum Announces Large Settlement with Pfizer for Misleading Drug Pricing Coupons

Oregon has recouped over million in civil settlements from Pfizer since 2003 ...

2 week standoff ends with Oregon man's arrest

PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) — An Oregon man has surrendered to police following a two-week standoff sparked by a custody dispute.The Oregonian/OregonLive reports that 42-year-old Stephen Adam Cain surrendered peacefully Monday after days of discussions with negotiators from the Douglas County...

Permanent offshore oil drilling ban OK'd by Oregon lawmakers

SALEM, Ore. (AP) — Oregon state lawmakers on Tuesday overwhelmingly approved a permanent offshore oil drilling ban as the Trump administration forges ahead with a plan that could open up the Pacific coast for petroleum exploration and extraction.The House voted 47-8 to prohibit drilling and...

Missouri appeals NCAA sanctions levied against 3 sports

Missouri filed a notice of appeal with the NCAA's committee on infractions Thursday, beginning what could be a lengthy fight of what it considers overly harsh sanctions levied against three of its programs for academic misconduct involving a former tutor.The NCAA banned the football, baseball and...

Indiana St gives Mallory contract extension through 2023

TERRE HAUTE, Ind. (AP) — Indiana State coach Curt Mallory has agreed to a two-year contract extension that will run through 2023.Athletic department officials made the announcement Tuesday.Last season Mallory led the Sycamores to a 7-4 mark, a No. 22 ranking and a third-place finish in the...

OPINION

Mississippi Must Redraw Lines for Mississippi Delta Senate District

Federal Appeals Court rules African Americans were denied voting rights ...

Backyard Birding in Portland-A Lesson in Flight

A few minutes from our homes in North Portland, Smith and Bybee Wetlands Natural Area is a 2000 acre natural wetland known to host over 100 species of birds. Armed with a single pair of binoculars and our eyes, we set off for adventure. ...

House Chair Waters Leads Charge to Return Consumer Protection to CFPB

Although Director Kraninger announced a plan to suspend the payday rule, changes in how the Bureau operated with regard to these lenders began under Mulvaney. While at CFPB, he urged Congress to repeal the rule and joined a lawsuit brought by a payday lender...

The Skanner Editorial: Consumers Need Transparency in Medication Pricing

Prescription drug prices have been rising so fast that people who depend on them to stay alive and healthy can't afford them ...

AFRICAN AMERICANS IN THE NEWS

The Latest: NZ deputy leader vows quick work on gun reforms

CHRISTCHURCH, New Zealand (AP) — The Latest on the mosque attacks in New Zealand (all times local):7:45 p.m.New Zealand's deputy prime minister has expressed condolences for Indonesian victims of the Christchurch mosque attacks.Winston Peters spoke Wednesday while in Jakarta for a meeting...

New Zealand holds first funerals for mosque shooting victims

CHRISTCHURCH, New Zealand (AP) — A father and son who fled the civil war in Syria for "the safest country in the world" were buried before hundreds of mourners Wednesday, the first funerals for victims of shootings at two mosques in New Zealand that horrified a nation known for being...

The Latest: Police say mosque gunman planned another attack

CHRISTCHURCH, New Zealand (AP) — The Latest on the mosque shootings in New Zealand (all times local):5:25 p.m.New Zealand Police Commissioner Mike Bush says he believes police officers stopped the gunman who killed 50 people at two mosques on his way to another attack.Bush says they believe...

ENTERTAINMENT

Coroner says 'Young and Restless' star died of heart disease

LOS ANGELES (AP) — "The Young and the Restless" star Kristoff St. John died of heart disease, with excessive drinking at the time of his death a contributing factor, according to a coroner's report released Tuesday.Investigators listed "hypertrophic heart disease" as the cause of the...

Jordan Peele dares everyone to look at the horrors of 'Us'

LOS ANGELES (AP) — Jordan Peele's sweet spot as a filmmaker are the "pit in your stomach" moments. That thing that happens when you realize the woman stirring the tea isn't just there for conversation. When you notice that the help is a little off. Or, as in his new film "Us," when you see...

In end of 20th Century Fox, a new era dawns for Hollywood

NEW YORK (AP) — The Fox Studio backlot, first built in 1926 on a Century City ranch in Los Angeles, was enormous. Before much of it was sold off in the 1960s, it was four times the size of its current, and still huge, 53 acres.Shirley Temple's bungalow still sits on the lot, as does the...

U.S. & WORLD NEWS

Sorrow revisited: Re-creating Katrina's muck in New Orleans

NEW ORLEANS (AP) — Patches of black mold on the ceiling. Water marks on the dingy walls. Toys, furniture...

APNewsBreak: Congress' inaction endangers black lung fund

COEBURN, Va. (AP) — Former coal miner John Robinson's bills for black lung treatments run ,000 a month,...

Smoking strong pot daily raises psychosis risk, study finds

LONDON (AP) — Smoking high-potency marijuana every day could increase the chances of developing psychosis...

Erdogan again airs attack video at rally despite criticism

ANKARA, Turkey (AP) — Ignoring widespread criticism, Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan on Tuesday...

New Kazakh president sworn in after longtime leader resigns

MOSCOW (AP) — The speaker of Kazakhstan's parliament was sworn in as interim president on Wednesday, a day...

Trump buddies up with Bolsonaro, the 'Trump of the Tropics'

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump welcomed Brazil's new far-right leader to the White House Tuesday...

McMenamins
The Associated Press

WASHINGTON — In the first presidential election since the tea party's emergence, Republican candidates are drifting rightward on a range of issues, even though more centrist stands might play well in the 2012 general election.

On energy, taxes, health care and other topics, the top candidates hold positions that are more conservative than those they espoused a few years ago.

The shifts reflect the evolving views of conservative voters, who will play a major role in choosing the Republican nominee. In that sense, the candidates' repositioning seems savvy or even essential.

But the eventual nominee will face President Barack Obama in the 2012 general election, when independent voters appear likely to be decisive players once again. Those independents may be far less enamored of hard-right positions than are the GOP activists who will wield power in the Iowa caucuses, the New Hampshire primary and other nominating contests.

"The most visible shift in the political landscape" in recent years "is the emergence of a single bloc of across-the-board conservatives," says the Pew Research Center, which conducts extensive voter surveys. Many of them "take extremely conservative positions on nearly all issues," Pew reports. They largely "agree with the tea party," and "very strongly disapprove of Barack Obama's job performance."

Climate policy is a dramatic example of how GOP presidential hopefuls have shifted to the right in recent years. Former Govs. Mitt Romney of Massachusetts, Tim Pawlenty of Minnesota and Jon Huntsman of Utah, along with other likely candidates, have backed away from earlier embraces of regional "cap-and-trade" programs to reduce greenhouse gas pollution.

Such stands were unremarkable in GOP circles just a few years ago. Sen. John McCain, the 2008 presidential nominee, supported a cap and trade plan to place prices and limits on the emission of heat-trapping gasses.

Now the position is anathema to millions of Republicans, and therefore to the party's candidates. Pawlenty is the most effusive in his backtracking. "I was wrong, it was a mistake, and I'm sorry," he says repeatedly.

The likely presidential candidates have shifted rightward on other issues as well.

Romney, who leads in most polls, has rejected his earlier stands supporting abortion rights, gun control and gay rights. He says his 2006 law requiring Massachusetts residents to obtain health insurance was right for his state at the time, but he has condemned the Obama-backed mandate that would cover all Americans.

Pawlenty campaigns as a tight-fisted conservative who would refuse to raise the nation's debt ceiling, even though many Republican leaders say economic chaos would ensue. Yet in 2006, Pawlenty told a newspaper, "the era of small government is over" and "government has to be more proactive, more aggressive."

Pawlenty says he was partly quoting another person. But in the same 2006 interview he said, "there are certain circumstances where you've got to have government put up the guardrails or bust up entrenched interests before they become too powerful."

Pawlenty has abandoned such talk in his presidential quest.

The Republican Party's rightward drift is causing headaches for the presidential hopefuls on the issue of Medicare, a potential minefield in the general election. House Republicans passed a bill that eventually would convert Medicare to a less costly, less generous program. It would help older Americans buy health insurance, but it no longer would provide benefits based mainly on a patient's needs rather than costs.

Presidential candidate Newt Gingrich touched off a firestorm by calling the plan radical. He spent the better part of a week trying to recant, change the subject and get his campaign back on track.

Pawlenty, after promising to offer his own Medicare plan, acknowledged conservatives' priorities and said he would sign the House measure if it were the only choice before him.

Romney hedged Friday on whether he would sign the House bill into law. "That's the kind of speculation that is getting the cart ahead of the horse," he said. "I'm going to have my own plan."

Many Republican activists are delighted by the rightward tack of their party and its presidential contenders.

If anything, "mainstream Republican leaders are pushing the party too far to the left," said Sid Dinerstein, GOP chairman in Palm Beach County, Fla. The House plan for Medicare is the only one that makes sense, he said, and GOP candidates "should become articulate and knowledgeable in talking about it."

Louisiana's Republican chairman, Roger F. Villere Jr., agrees.

"The conservative issues are the correct issues," he said. The presidential candidates should embrace the House stand, he said, and persuade voters they care more about saving Medicare than the Democrats do.

Some in Obama's camp, however, say the presidential contenders risk locking themselves into hard-right positions that won't play well when less ideological voters flock to the polls in November 2012.

Romney, Pawlenty, Gingrich and others "are wiggling all over the place" to appease staunch conservatives, said Bill Burton, Obama's former spokesman and now a Democratic fundraiser and advocate. Americans want strong, consistent leaders, he said, and the Republican contenders aren't filling the bill.

Obama, of course, has had his own inconsistencies, such as backing away from calls to increase payroll and income taxes on the wealthy.

Moreover, competitive Democratic primaries are usually the mirror image of GOP contests. Democratic candidates generally edge to the left to attract liberal activists before hewing back to the center for the general election.

This time, however, Obama has no primary opponents to worry about. That allows him to focus on the all-important independent voters, who swung the 2008 elections to Democrats, and the 2010 midterm elections to Republicans.

The latest Pew Research study suggests that independents, who "played a determinative role in the last three national elections," will have even more clout in 2012. They comprised 30 percent of the national electorate in 2005, Pew found. They now make up 37 percent.

Whoever survives the conservative-dominated Republican nominating process will have to address those independents' concerns quickly and adroitly.

Carpentry Professionals
Calendar

Photo Gallery

Photos and slide shows of local events