06-20-2019  6:05 am   •   PDX Weather    •   SEA weather  
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NORTHWEST NEWS

Gov. Kate Brown Says She'll Use Police if GOP Walks Out

Her statement heightens tensions with Senate Republicans, who said earlier this week that they are "prepared to take action to stop" what could become the nation's second statewide cap and trade program.

Seattle Gives Voters $100 to Donate to Favorite Candidates

This year, 72 candidates registered to compete for seven seats, making the race by several measures the most competitive in more than 15 years.

Progressive Climate Policy Poised to Pass in Oregon

Oregon is on the precipice of becoming the second state after California to adopt a cap-and-trade program, a market-based approach to lowering the greenhouse gas emissions behind global warming.

Photos: Oregon Welcomes Shakespeare Festival’s Newly Appointed Artistic Director

On Wednesday, June 12, the Oregon Shakespeare Festival hosted a reception at the Froelick Gallery to welcome newly appointed artistic director Nataki Garret.

NEWS BRIEFS

Portland Winter Light Festival 2020 Now Accepting Art Submissions

Portland Winter Light Festival 2020 is now accepting art submissions for the annual event ...

National African American Reparations Commission, ACLU to Host Forum on Reparations

Forum to Follow Congressional Hearing on Bill to Form a Commission to Study and Develop Reparation Proposals ...

Must-See Shows Open in OSF Outdoor Theatre

New shows are Alice in Wonderland, Macbeth and All’s Well That Ends Well. ...

Roosevelt High School Students Earn National Recognition for Resiliency

Students from Roosevelt High School who recently started a storytelling and resiliency-building initiative have been invited to...

Seattle Art Museum Appoints Amada Cruz as New Director and CEO

The Board of Trustees of the Seattle Art Museum (SAM) announced today that Amada Cruz has been chosen as the museum’s new Illsley...

University fraternity suspended until June 2021 for hazing

EUGENE, Ore. (AP) — The University of Oregon chapter of the Alpha Epsilon Pi fraternity has been suspended for the next two years following a university investigation of hazing.The Register-Guard reported Wednesday the local chapter of Epsilon Omega lost its recognition by the university and...

Oregon man sues property company with unsafe apartment claim

PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) — An Oregon man is suing a property management company for what he says are unsafe apartment living conditions.KOIN-TV reported Wednesday that Brian Jackson of Portland filed a lawsuit Tuesday against Income Property Management Corporation.The company is contracted to...

OPINION

U.S. Attempt to Erase Harriet Tubman

Traitors like Jefferson Davis and other Confederates are memorialized while a woman who risked her life time and again to free enslaved people is simply dismissed. ...

Watching a Father and Son

You must have seen this video of a father speaking with his pre-verbal son about the season finale of Empire. ...

The Congressional Black Caucus Must Oppose HR 246

If every tactic that was used by African Americans in the Civil Rights Movement and/or in the fight against apartheid South Africa was either criminalized or attacked by the US Congress, how would you respond? ...

Jamestown to Jamestown: Commemorating 400 Years of the African Diaspora Experience

We are now able to actualize the healing and collective unity so many generations have worked to achieve in ways which bring power to our communities in America, Africa and throughout our Diaspora. ...

AFRICAN AMERICANS IN THE NEWS

Israel honors Patriots owner Kraft amid solicitation case

JERUSALEM (AP) — Israel is honoring New England Patriots owner Robert Kraft with the 2019 Genesis Prize for his philanthropy and commitment to combatting anti-Semitism.Thursday's gala ceremony in Jerusalem and his high-profile feting offers Kraft a welcome reprieve just four months after he...

Police shooting poses Buttigieg's biggest 2020 challenge yet

SOUTH BEND, Ind. (AP) — Mayor Pete Buttigieg stood before newly sworn police officers to welcome them to the city's ranks, just as he has more than a dozen times since taking office. But this time he was a Democratic candidate for president, speaking days after a white officer fatally shot a...

Biden's words on segregationist senators draw rivals' fire

Democratic presidential candidate Joe Biden is dismissing calls to apologize for saying that the Senate "got things done" with "civility" even when the body included segregationists with whom he disagreed.His rivals for the 2020 nomination, including the two major black candidates in the race,...

ENTERTAINMENT

MSNBC deal with S. Carolina Dems rankles other media outlets

COLUMBIA, S.C. (AP) — South Carolina's Democratic leader says he granted MSNBC exclusive live rights to this weekend's party convention because the network agreed to show speeches from 21 presidential contenders and offered a strong chance to reach black voters.The coverage arrangement for...

Ralph Lauren receives honorary knighthood in London

LONDON (AP) — Ralph Lauren has collected an accolade from Prince Charles and it's a doozy: Honorary Knight Commander of the Most Excellent Order of the British Empire for Services to Fashion.The designer was presented with the insignia, bestowed by Queen Elizabeth II, in a private ceremony...

U2 guitarist won't get to build mansions on Malibu hillside

MALIBU, Calif. (AP) — A plan by U2 guitarist The Edge to build a cluster of mansions on a ridgeline above Malibu appears to be dead after California's highest court declined to consider his last-ditch appeal.The musician, whose real name is David Evans, staged a 14-year legal fight to build...

U.S. & WORLD NEWS

In Lebanon, Syrian refugees face new pressure to go home

ARSAL, Lebanon (AP) — Lebanese authorities are making their most aggressive campaign yet for Syrian...

Oil shippers boost security after attacks on tankers in Gulf

DUBAI, United Arab Emirates (AP) — A series of attacks on oil tankers near the Persian Gulf has ratcheted...

APNewsBreak: Texas says Rapid DNA supplier jeopardizes cases

AUSTIN, Texas (AP) — With a name that sounds like futuristic fiction, Rapid DNA machines roughly the size...

The Latest: Macron: EU summit not France vs Germany contest

BRUSSELS (AP) — The Latest on the EU summit (all times local):2:45 p.m.French President Emmanuel Macron...

Xi's NKorea visit a chance to strengthen ties, influence US

BEIJING (AP) — In the highly formalized world of China-North Korea relations, Xi Jinping's trip to...

Climate of guilt: Flying no longer the high road for some

NYKOPING, Sweden (AP) — School's out for summer and Swedish lawyer Pia Bjorstrand, her husband and their...

McMenamins
The Associated Press

WASHINGTON — In the first presidential election since the tea party's emergence, Republican candidates are drifting rightward on a range of issues, even though more centrist stands might play well in the 2012 general election.

On energy, taxes, health care and other topics, the top candidates hold positions that are more conservative than those they espoused a few years ago.

The shifts reflect the evolving views of conservative voters, who will play a major role in choosing the Republican nominee. In that sense, the candidates' repositioning seems savvy or even essential.

But the eventual nominee will face President Barack Obama in the 2012 general election, when independent voters appear likely to be decisive players once again. Those independents may be far less enamored of hard-right positions than are the GOP activists who will wield power in the Iowa caucuses, the New Hampshire primary and other nominating contests.

"The most visible shift in the political landscape" in recent years "is the emergence of a single bloc of across-the-board conservatives," says the Pew Research Center, which conducts extensive voter surveys. Many of them "take extremely conservative positions on nearly all issues," Pew reports. They largely "agree with the tea party," and "very strongly disapprove of Barack Obama's job performance."

Climate policy is a dramatic example of how GOP presidential hopefuls have shifted to the right in recent years. Former Govs. Mitt Romney of Massachusetts, Tim Pawlenty of Minnesota and Jon Huntsman of Utah, along with other likely candidates, have backed away from earlier embraces of regional "cap-and-trade" programs to reduce greenhouse gas pollution.

Such stands were unremarkable in GOP circles just a few years ago. Sen. John McCain, the 2008 presidential nominee, supported a cap and trade plan to place prices and limits on the emission of heat-trapping gasses.

Now the position is anathema to millions of Republicans, and therefore to the party's candidates. Pawlenty is the most effusive in his backtracking. "I was wrong, it was a mistake, and I'm sorry," he says repeatedly.

The likely presidential candidates have shifted rightward on other issues as well.

Romney, who leads in most polls, has rejected his earlier stands supporting abortion rights, gun control and gay rights. He says his 2006 law requiring Massachusetts residents to obtain health insurance was right for his state at the time, but he has condemned the Obama-backed mandate that would cover all Americans.

Pawlenty campaigns as a tight-fisted conservative who would refuse to raise the nation's debt ceiling, even though many Republican leaders say economic chaos would ensue. Yet in 2006, Pawlenty told a newspaper, "the era of small government is over" and "government has to be more proactive, more aggressive."

Pawlenty says he was partly quoting another person. But in the same 2006 interview he said, "there are certain circumstances where you've got to have government put up the guardrails or bust up entrenched interests before they become too powerful."

Pawlenty has abandoned such talk in his presidential quest.

The Republican Party's rightward drift is causing headaches for the presidential hopefuls on the issue of Medicare, a potential minefield in the general election. House Republicans passed a bill that eventually would convert Medicare to a less costly, less generous program. It would help older Americans buy health insurance, but it no longer would provide benefits based mainly on a patient's needs rather than costs.

Presidential candidate Newt Gingrich touched off a firestorm by calling the plan radical. He spent the better part of a week trying to recant, change the subject and get his campaign back on track.

Pawlenty, after promising to offer his own Medicare plan, acknowledged conservatives' priorities and said he would sign the House measure if it were the only choice before him.

Romney hedged Friday on whether he would sign the House bill into law. "That's the kind of speculation that is getting the cart ahead of the horse," he said. "I'm going to have my own plan."

Many Republican activists are delighted by the rightward tack of their party and its presidential contenders.

If anything, "mainstream Republican leaders are pushing the party too far to the left," said Sid Dinerstein, GOP chairman in Palm Beach County, Fla. The House plan for Medicare is the only one that makes sense, he said, and GOP candidates "should become articulate and knowledgeable in talking about it."

Louisiana's Republican chairman, Roger F. Villere Jr., agrees.

"The conservative issues are the correct issues," he said. The presidential candidates should embrace the House stand, he said, and persuade voters they care more about saving Medicare than the Democrats do.

Some in Obama's camp, however, say the presidential contenders risk locking themselves into hard-right positions that won't play well when less ideological voters flock to the polls in November 2012.

Romney, Pawlenty, Gingrich and others "are wiggling all over the place" to appease staunch conservatives, said Bill Burton, Obama's former spokesman and now a Democratic fundraiser and advocate. Americans want strong, consistent leaders, he said, and the Republican contenders aren't filling the bill.

Obama, of course, has had his own inconsistencies, such as backing away from calls to increase payroll and income taxes on the wealthy.

Moreover, competitive Democratic primaries are usually the mirror image of GOP contests. Democratic candidates generally edge to the left to attract liberal activists before hewing back to the center for the general election.

This time, however, Obama has no primary opponents to worry about. That allows him to focus on the all-important independent voters, who swung the 2008 elections to Democrats, and the 2010 midterm elections to Republicans.

The latest Pew Research study suggests that independents, who "played a determinative role in the last three national elections," will have even more clout in 2012. They comprised 30 percent of the national electorate in 2005, Pew found. They now make up 37 percent.

Whoever survives the conservative-dominated Republican nominating process will have to address those independents' concerns quickly and adroitly.

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