05-23-2018  5:34 pm      •     
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NEWS BRIEFS

Mississippi Avenue Giving Tuesday

On Tuesday, May 22, 10 percent of proceeds from participating Mississippi Ave. businesses will go to SEI ...

Raina Croff to Speak at Architectural Heritage Center

'When the Landmarks are Gone: Older African Americans, Place, and Change in N/NE Portland’ describes SHARP Walking Program ...

Portland Playhouse Presents August Wilson’s ‘Fences’ Through June 10

May 20 performance will include discussion on mental health; June 10 performance will be followed by discussion of fatherhood ...

Peggy Houston-Shivers Presents Benefit Concert for Allen Temple CME

Concert to take place May 20 at Maranatha Church ...

Lawmakers hold hearing to discuss Oregon dairy's downfall

SALEM, Ore. (AP) — Oregon lawmakers are asking questions about what went wrong with a large dairy that is facing a lawsuit, regulatory problems and bankruptcy in an effort to find ways to prevent a similar situation in the future.The Senate Interim Committee on Environment and Natural...

Editorials from around Oregon

Selected editorials from Oregon newspapers:_____The Oregonian/OregonLive, May 23, on rebuilding faith in police oversight board:Derek Ashton, an attorney representing former Portland Police Chief Larry O'Dea, didn't mince words in criticizing a committee's recommendation that O'Dea lose his police...

Amazon, Starbucks pledge money to repeal Seattle head tax

SEATTLE (AP) — Amazon, Starbucks, Vulcan and other companies have pledged a total of more than 0,000 toward an effort to repeal Seattle's newly passed tax on large employers intended to combat homelessness.Just days after the Seattle City Council approved the levy, the No Tax On Jobs...

14 vehicles destroyed in central Washington brush fire

SELAH, Wash. (AP) — Authorities say 14 vehicles were destroyed in a brush fire in central Washington.The Yakima Herald-Republic reports the fire scorched about a half square mile near Selah on Tuesday.Selah Deputy Fire Chief Jim Lange says the fire threatened multiple homes and burned up to...

OPINION

Racism After Graduation May Just Be What's on the Menu

Dr. Julianne Malveaux says that for our young millennials, racism is inevitable ...

Prime Minister Netanyahu Shows Limits of Israel’s Democracy

Bill Fletcher, Jr. on racial politics in Israel and Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu’s uneven treatment of African immigrants ...

Golfing While Black Is Not a Crime

Grandview Golf Club asks five Black women to leave for golfing too slow ...

Discovering the Best of Black America in 2018

Dr. Benjamin F. Chavis discusses the DTU Journalism Fellowship & Scholarship Program ...

AFRICAN AMERICANS IN THE NEWS

Milwaukee chief apologizes for arrest of Bucks guard Brown

MILWAUKEE (AP) — Milwaukee Police Chief Alfonso Morales apologized to Bucks guard Sterling Brown on Wednesday for a January arrest that started with a parking violation and escalated to include use of a stun gun, and said some officers had been disciplined.Brown responded with a statement...

The Latest: Milwaukee NAACP head: No reason to use stun gun

MILWAUKEE (AP) — The Latest on Milwaukee police releasing body-camera footage showing the arrest of Bucks guard Sterling Brown (all times local):7:05 p.m.The president of the NAACP in Milwaukee says he doesn't see anything in a newly released police body-camera video that would warrant...

Offshore worker alleges bias in federal lawsuit

NEW ORLEANS (AP) — An African-American offshore oil worker has filed a federal lawsuit saying he was intimidated on the job by a supervisor who drew a picture of him dangling from a high rig structure while surrounded by co-workers in Ku Klux Klan hats.The lawsuit claims the worker was...

ENTERTAINMENT

Deadliest Catch' star pleads guilty to misdemeanor assault

SEATTLE (AP) — Celebrity crab-boat captain Sig Hansen has pleaded guilty to a misdemeanor charge that he spat on an Uber driver last year in Seattle.The Seattle Times reports (https://bit.ly/2s3scWE) the 52-year-old "Deadliest Catch" star pleaded guilty Wednesday.Under the plea deal, a...

Lawyer: Harvey Weinstein targeted by federal prosecutors

WASHINGTON (AP) — Harvey Weinstein's lawyer said in a court filing that federal prosecutors in New York have launched a criminal investigation into the film producer, in addition to a previously disclosed probe by the Manhattan District Attorney.Attorney Benjamin Brafman said in a...

Comedian Josh Denny not sorry about N-word tweets

NEW YORK (AP) — Comedian and Food Network host Josh Denny has called his tweets using the N-word and comparing use of "straight white male" to the racial slur as "very incendiary," but he said he's not sorry.The host of "Ginormous Food" appeared on Van Lathan's podcast "The Red Pill" on...

U.S. & WORLD NEWS

Family rejoices at finding of soldier's World War II plane

LOS ANGELES (AP) — Tom Kelly grew up on a Northern California farm and once thought of becoming a cowboy...

AP source: Jared Kushner granted security clearance

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump's son-in-law, Jared Kushner, has been granted a security clearance...

US employee in China reported strange sounds, pressure

BEIJING (AP) — A U.S. government employee in southern China reported abnormal sensations of sound and...

French government orders evacuation of Paris migrant camps

PARIS (AP) — Police are preparing to dismantle makeshift camps holding close to 2,500 migrants in the...

2 patients who fled Ebola ward among the dead in Congo

DAKAR, Senegal (AP) — Two infected patients who fled from an Ebola treatment center in a Congo city of 1.2...

Summits give aged North Korean spies hope of returning home

GWANGJU, South Korea (AP) — He's spent nearly six decades trapped on enemy soil, surviving 29 years in a...

Legislators vote on tuition for immigrants in Nashville
Alicia A. Caldwell and Nicholas Riccardi The Associated Press

WASHINGTON (AP) — Immigration, a prominent issue as the presidential campaign begins in earnest, is a complicated, emotional and broad subject. But for political purposes there's a very real question to be answered: What to do about the estimated 11 million people in the country illegally.

With Republicans in Congress unable to agree on an answer, President Barack Obama has taken executive action to limit deportations. All Republicans running for president oppose that step. But they're squeezed between big donors, who largely favor liberalization of immigration policy, and many primary voters, who don't.

A look at where some of the 2016 candidates stand on the issue:

 

Hillary Rodham Clinton: In a speech Tuesday, Clinton came out fully in favor of a path to eventual citizenship for most people here illegally. The Democratic candidate also pledged to expand Obama's executive actions if Congress does not move on an immigration overhaul. Her position could earn wide support among growing groups of Hispanic and Asian voters and stands apart from the more restrictive views of the Republican contenders.

 

Jeb Bush: The former Florida governor has endorsed a path to permanent legal status, short of citizenship, for people here illegally, but he has left the door open for the possibility of eventual citizenship. Bush opposes Obama's executive actions. He has also called for an overhaul of the country's legal immigration process to focus more on letting in needed workers rather than letting families reunify.

Perhaps his most striking departure from his Republican rivals is in his tone. Bush, who wrote a book on immigration, says those who have come to the U.S. illegally did so as "an act of love" to make a better life for their families. His wife is Mexican, he's bilingual and he hasn't been shy about speaking Spanish in the campaign.

 

Marco Rubio: The Florida senator and son of Cuban immigrants once led a push for immigration overhaul and favored eventual citizenship under certain conditions — putting him arguably to the left of Bush on the subject. But he backed off and repositioned.

Rubio co-authored a Senate bill that would have made citizenship possible for people in the U.S. illegally, once they learned English, paid back taxes and passed a background test. The bill passed the Senate but died in the House. Rubio now says a piecemeal approach is required because comprehensive legislation can't succeed. His approach is to start with securing the border and end with letting people who are in the U.S. illegally stay.

Immigrant rights groups say that end would never come, because people would always complain the border was not secure.

Like Bush, Rubio argues for a legal immigration system based more on immigrants' potential economic contributions than on letting them join family members already in the United States. Additionally, Rubio has said he would not immediately overturn one of Obama's actions, which allows people brought here illegally when they were young to stay.

 

Chris Christie: The New Jersey governor once embraced letting people who are in the country illegally stay, then he became quiet about the subject. Recently, he's hinted at backing some sort of legal status, saying the question of citizenship is a distraction, there's no way to deport 11 million people and most are here to work.

 

Mike Huckabee: The former Arkansas governor is among the many Republicans who vow to focus on border security. Yet he argues for a path to citizenship for young people who were brought to the U.S. illegally by their parents, and as governor supported a proposal that would have made those children eligible for in-state tuition at public colleges and universities in Arkansas. He says children shouldn't be punished because their parents broke the law. Arkansas did not adopt the plan.

 

Rand Paul: On one hand, the Kentucky senator has voiced frustration with fellow Republicans who describe any policy as "amnesty" if it would somehow let people here illegally stay. And he's said there is no way to deport everyone. On the other hand, he has not endorsed a specific way to allow people to stay. He voted against the one concrete proposal in Congress to permit that: the immigration bill Rubio co-authored.

 

Scott Walker: The Wisconsin governor once supported citizenship for people here illegally. He now says he opposes that. He recently told a Republican group in New Hampshire he'd be fine with legal status — essentially adopting Bush's position. But he has also questioned whether the current policy on legal immigration makes economic sense, suggesting he might side with those who believe high numbers of immigrants end up lowering workers' wages.

 

Ted Cruz: The Texas senator has been seen as the Republican field's firebrand on immigration. In the Senate, he was the most aggressive in pushing to slow down government business unless Obama rescinded his executive actions limiting deportations. He also voted against the Senate immigration bill pushed by Rubio. But even Cruz has declined to rule out eventually letting people in the country illegally stay. He says the border must be secured first, and the visa system changed. Only then, Cruz says, can the country discuss what is to be done about people here illegally.

All three senators in the race — Cruz, Rubio and Paul — voted against legislation to finance the Homeland Security Department in a budget dispute that arose as a protest against Obama's executive actions on immigration.

 

 VIDEO: Bernie Sanders talks to Chris Hayes on MSNBCs All In With Chris Hayes show

Riccardi reported from Denver.

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