05-26-2018  8:52 pm      •     
The Skanner Report
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NEWS BRIEFS

Attorney General Forms Hate Crime Task Force

The task force will study hate-motivated crimes and review existing legal protections for victims ...

Portland Art Museum Celebrates Art Museum Day with Free Admission on May 25

Portland Art Museum joins art museums across North America, with great works of art and public programs ...

June Key Delta Community Center Hosts May Week ’18 Health Fair May 26

Event includes vision, glucose screenings, medication disposal and car seat installation ...

Mississippi Avenue Giving Tuesday

On Tuesday, May 22, 10 percent of proceeds from participating Mississippi Ave. businesses will go to SEI ...

Oregon advances with 11-1 run-rule victory over Kentucky

EUGENE, Ore. (AP) — DJ Sanders hit a grand slam in a seven-run second inning and the Oregon Ducks are headed to the women's College World Series after an 11-1 run-rule victory over Kentucky Saturday night in the deciding game of the Eugene Super Regional.Shannon Rhodes hit a solo home run...

Amtrak: No evidence injured passenger was in fight

RENO, Nev. (AP) — The family of a 22-year-old train passenger found severely injured next to railroad tracks in Truckee, California, suspects he may have been the victim of a hate crime, but Amtrak said Saturday that investigators have found no evidence of foul play.Aaron Salazar's family...

City aims to block release of dangerous psychiatric patients

LAKEWOOD, Wash. (AP) — The city that houses Western State Hospital, Washington's main psychiatric facility, is fighting to keep patients from being released into its boundaries.The News Tribune reports Lakewood on Monday approved a moratorium on city business licenses for new adult family...

Missing fisherman found by divers in submerged vessel

SEATTLE (AP) — The body of a missing fisherman was found by divers inside the sunken vessel, the Kelli J.The Coast Guard said Saturday that the body was found before the vessel was refloated by contractors in Willapay Bay on Friday.The Pacific County Sheriff's Office took the fisherman's...

OPINION

Racism After Graduation May Just Be What's on the Menu

Dr. Julianne Malveaux says that for our young millennials, racism is inevitable ...

Prime Minister Netanyahu Shows Limits of Israel’s Democracy

Bill Fletcher, Jr. on racial politics in Israel and Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu’s uneven treatment of African immigrants ...

Golfing While Black Is Not a Crime

Grandview Golf Club asks five Black women to leave for golfing too slow ...

Discovering the Best of Black America in 2018

Dr. Benjamin F. Chavis discusses the DTU Journalism Fellowship & Scholarship Program ...

AFRICAN AMERICANS IN THE NEWS

Meeting draws people angry over fatal police shooting

RICHMOND, Va. (AP) — More than 200 people turned out for a community meeting Saturday to protest the death of a young black man who was fatally shot by a Virginia police officer after he ran naked onto an interstate highway.Speakers at the meeting at Richmond's Second Baptist Church said...

The Latest: Family: Police need to handle people better

RICHMOND, Va. (AP) — The Latest on the fatal police shooting of a naked and unarmed man in Richmond (all times local):5:16 p.m.Family and friends of a man who was fatally shot by Richmond police after running naked onto an interstate highway are calling on police to find non-lethal ways of...

White neighbor gets prison for harassing black family

EASTON, Pa. (AP) — A neighbor accused of harassing and using racial epithets against a black Pennsylvania family for years has been sentenced to prison.A Northampton County judge sentenced 45-year-old Robert Kujawa to the term Friday after a jury convicted him of ethnic intimidation,...

ENTERTAINMENT

Glenn Snoddy, inventor of fuzz pedal for guitarists, dies

MURFREESBORO, Tennessee (AP) — A recording engineer whose invention of a pedal that allowed guitarists to create a fuzzy, distorted sound most famously used by Keith Richards in the Rolling Stones' hit "(I Can't Get No) Satisfaction" has died.Glenn Snoddy was 96. His daughter Dianne Mayo...

Reaction to criminal charges filed against Harvey Weinstein

Reaction to rape and other criminal charges filed in New York on Friday against Harvey Weinstein:"I hope this gives hope to victims and survivors everywhere, that we are one step closer to justice. Because one win is a win for all of us." — Weinstein accuser Rose McGowan, to The Associated...

Vindication, triumph, also fear: Weinstein accusers react

NEW YORK (AP) — Watching the stunning images of Harvey Weinstein walking into a courthouse Friday in handcuffs, a detective on each arm, Louisette Geiss still felt a shiver of fear in reaction to the man who, she says, once cornered her and tried to physically force her to watch him...

U.S. & WORLD NEWS

Klay Thompson score 35, Warriors force Game 7 in West finals

OAKLAND, Calif. (AP) — Klay Thompson hit nine 3-pointers and scored 35 points, the Warriors held James...

AP FACT CHECK: Trump on border stats _ and a Merkel mystery

WASHINGTON (AP) — Illegal border crossings, as President Donald Trump measures them, have gone up since he...

US Gulf Coast prepares as Alberto brings wind, rain north

ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. (AP) — Florida, Alabama and Mississippi launched emergency preparations ahead of the...

Declassified US cables link Uribe to Colombia drug cartels

BOGOTA, Colombia (AP) — As Alvaro Uribe, Colombia's most powerful politician, was making his rise to the...

Ebola vaccinations begin in rural Congo on Monday: Ministry

KINSHASA, Congo (AP) — Ebola vaccinations will begin Monday in the two rural areas of Congo where the...

Israeli soldier badly wounded in West Bank arrest raid dies

JERUSALEM (AP) — The Israeli military says a soldier who was seriously wounded in action this week has...

Jon Marcus the Hechinger Report

NEW YORK (CNNMoney) -- Bahiya Nasuuna hasn't even started college, but she already has several academic credits in the bank that will give her a jump on graduation.

"My parents need as much help as they can get [to cover tuition]," said Nasuuna, who will be attending the University of Massachusetts, Amherst this fall.

Nasuuna passed seven Advanced Placement exams at her public high school in Chelsea, Mass., including one in English that will allow her to forgo an introductory writing course her freshman year.

She is one of a growing number of students getting a head start on college credits while they are still in high school, cutting costs and speeding toward degrees -- and jobs -- as quickly as possible.

But it's not just about taking AP tests. High school students are also enrolling in college courses, receiving college credit for life experiences, such as community service or being able to speak a foreign language, or even skipping their junior or senior year altogether to attend so-called "early colleges."

"Everyone is looking for a leg up," said Dave Taylor, principal of the Dayton Early College Academy in Ohio, a charter high school where students simultaneously enroll in classes at nearby Sinclair Community College and start earning college credits as early as their sophomore year.

Some 1.3 million students took classes for university credit before completing high school during the 2010-2011 academic year, up 67% since 2003, according to the U.S. Department of Education.

Much of this trend is being driven by the skyrocketing cost of college. Students enrolled in early college high schools, for example, earn an average of 36 college credits, nearly a third the number they'll need for a bachelor's degree, according to a study by the advocacy group Jobs for the Future.

But there's also evidence that exposing high school students to the challenges of college-level work can increase their eventual likelihood of success.

More students who take college-level courses in high school go on to college than their classmates who don't, a report released in June by the American Institutes for Research, or AIR, found.

They're also more likely than their peers to stay in college once they get there, earn higher grades, and eventually graduate, according to a separate study conducted in Florida and New York by the Community College Research Center at Teachers College, Columbia University.

"What we hear from kids all the time is, 'It's amazing to me that I can sit in a college classroom with 22-year-olds,'" Taylor said. "When you're actually doing college work, it ups the ante quite a bit, so they feel like they can compete and be successful wherever they might choose to go."

Most college courses that are offered in high schools are taught by faculty from two-year community colleges under so-called dual-enrollment partnerships. They're conducted either in the high schools themselves or at close-by higher-education institutions.

In Oregon and Colorado, some students can take a fifth year of high school, using it to earn credits at nearby community colleges. Since they're technically still enrolled in their local school districts their tuition, fees, and textbooks are paid for by state funding for public-school education.

The universities and colleges have motivations of their own for going to this extra trouble. "They know they would otherwise get students who are unprepared, who end up in remedial courses, or who don't graduate," said Joel Vargas, vice president of Jobs for the Future.

High school students can also take the College Level Examination Program test, or CLEP, and if it shows they've mastered any of 33 different college-level subjects from what they've learned in jobs, through community service or because they're fluent in a language other than English, they can submit the results for prospective college credit.

This doesn't mean that every university or college will accept all of the credits students earn, though a survey by the Western Interstate Commission for Higher Education found that 92% of public institutions nationwide give credit for at least some dual-enrollment courses and 91% for AP exams.

An added benefit from doing college-level work in high school is that it allows students to experience what higher education is like while still living at home.

"What we're seeing more of now is a greater emphasis on programs that are smoothing over the college transition," said Adam Lowe, executive director of the National Alliance of Concurrent Enrollment Partnerships.

On the opposite extreme are early colleges that put 10th or 11th graders who have outgrown what their high school can offer them into college courses and directly on the fast track to a degree, with a high school diploma conferred along the way. All are private, and charge the usual college tuition.

"Students talk about how relatively isolated they felt in their sending schools because they were interested in Plato and their classmates were interested in the five-paragraph essay," said Peter Laipson, provost at Bard College at Simon's Rock, which enrolls students as young as 16.

But whether they end up going to a four-year university or a community college, these high school students are smart enough to know they're saving themselves and their families a lot of money.

"Certainly we hear that anecdotally -- that I got this almost for free," said Andrea Berger, who led the research work at AIR. "And certainly they are getting [a degree] for less money."

 

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