05-24-2018  2:52 pm      •     
The Skanner Report
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NEWS BRIEFS

Attorney General Forms Hate Crime Task Force

The task force will study hate-motivated crimes and review existing legal protections for victims ...

Portland Art Museum Celebrates Art Museum Day with Free Admission on May 25

Portland Art Museum joins art museums across North America, with great works of art and public programs ...

June Key Delta Community Center Hosts May Week ’18 Health Fair May 26

Event includes vision, glucose screenings, medication disposal and car seat installation ...

Mississippi Avenue Giving Tuesday

On Tuesday, May 22, 10 percent of proceeds from participating Mississippi Ave. businesses will go to SEI ...

Power outages temporarily halt flights at Sea-Tac Airport

SEATTLE (AP) — Officials say scattered power outages halted some flights on the south side of Seattle-Tacoma International Airport.KOMO-TV reports airport spokesman Perry Cooper said after 12:30 p.m. Thursday that flights were slowly resuming.Airport officials said on Twitter that all power...

Amazon: Echo device sent conversation to family's contact

SEATTLE (AP) — Amazon says an "unlikely" string of events prompted its Echo personal assistant device to record a Portland, Oregon, family's private conversation and then send the recording to an acquaintance in Seattle.The woman told KIRO-TV that two weeks ago an employee of her husband...

OPINION

Racism After Graduation May Just Be What's on the Menu

Dr. Julianne Malveaux says that for our young millennials, racism is inevitable ...

Prime Minister Netanyahu Shows Limits of Israel’s Democracy

Bill Fletcher, Jr. on racial politics in Israel and Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu’s uneven treatment of African immigrants ...

Golfing While Black Is Not a Crime

Grandview Golf Club asks five Black women to leave for golfing too slow ...

Discovering the Best of Black America in 2018

Dr. Benjamin F. Chavis discusses the DTU Journalism Fellowship & Scholarship Program ...

AFRICAN AMERICANS IN THE NEWS

MLK daughter: No, Bannon, my dad wouldn't be proud of Trump

ATLANTA (AP) — The Rev. Martin Luther King's daughter blasted Steve Bannon's claim that her father would be proud of President Donald Trump."#SteveBannon has dangerously and erroneously co-opted my father's name, work and words," the Rev. Bernice King wrote just before midnight Wednesday in...

NFL's policy could mean a new playbook on protests this fall

PHILADELPHIA (AP) — Now that the NFL is drawing the line against players kneeling during the national anthem, athletes protesting police brutality and racial inequality may need to find a new playbook.The question is whether they intend to escalate their protests in some way."The owners can...

Court: School can let trans students use bathroom of choice

PHILADELPHIA (AP) — A Pennsylvania school district can allow transgender students to continue using bathrooms and locker rooms that correspond with their sexual identity, a federal appeals court panel ruled Thursday.A three-judge panel heard extended arguments in the case before conferring...

ENTERTAINMENT

Scenes cut from 'Show Dogs' over resemblance to sexual abuse

LOS ANGELES (AP) — Two scenes are being cut from the family movie "Show Dogs" after complaints that they resemble real-life sexual abuse, the movie's distributor has announced.In the movie, a police dog goes undercover at a dog show to catch animal smugglers.In one scene, the dog is told to...

Stoner comedy pioneer Tommy Chong still toking, joking at 80

LOS ANGELES (AP) — Yeah man, Tommy Chong says he always knew he'd live to see the day marijuana legalization would be sweeping America.He knew when he and partner Cheech Marin pioneered stoner comedy 50 years ago, a time when taunting the establishment with constant reminders that they...

Paltrow: Brad Pitt threatened Harvey Weinstein

NEW YORK (AP) — Gwyneth Paltrow says ex-boyfriend Brad Pitt threatened producer Harvey Weinstein after an alleged incident of sexual misconduct.The 45-year-old actress told "The Howard Stern Show" on Wednesday she was "blindsided." Paltrow claimed she was 22 when Weinstein placed his hands...

U.S. & WORLD NEWS

MLB panel says baseballs getting extra lift, cause unknown

NEW YORK (AP) — Baseballs really have been getting extra lift since 2015, and it's not from the exaggerated...

Body camera video is latest setback for Milwaukee police

MILWAUKEE (AP) — Body camera video showing police using a stun gun on an NBA player over a parking...

Bus driver charged in crash that killed student, teacher

A school bus driver with a history of driver's license suspensions caused a fatal crash on a New Jersey highway...

Israel defense chief plans 2,500 new West Bank settler homes

JERUSALEM (AP) — Israel's defense minister said Thursday he will seek approval next week to fast-track...

Cyclone Mekunu pounds Yemen island on its path to Oman

SALALAH, Oman (AP) — Cyclone Mekunu roared over the Yemeni island of Socotra in the Arabian Sea on its way...

Saudi Arabia releases 3 women as other activists still held

DUBAI, United Arab Emirates (AP) — Saudi authorities have released three prominent women's rights...

Laura Smith-Spark CNN

LONDON (CNN) -- Celebrated "Harry Potter" author J.K. Rowling has said she feels "duped and angry" over British Prime Minister David Cameron's response to a major inquiry into phone hacking and other abuses by the press.


Rowling was one of hundreds of witnesses to testify to the Leveson Inquiry into media standards and ethics, set up in the wake of a phone-hacking scandal at Rupert Murdoch's News of the World tabloid.


The judge who led the inquiry, Lord Justice Leveson, released his long-awaited report Thursday, in which he recommended an independent regulator be set up by the press, which would be backed by new laws to make sure it meets certain standards.


Cameron, of the Conservative Party, supported Brian Leveson's call for an independent regulator -- but said he was not convinced that legislation is needed to underpin the new body.


Rowling expressed her disappointment in the prime minister's decision in a statement posted Friday on the website of Hacked Off, a group campaigning for media reform.


"Having taken David Cameron's assurances in good faith at the outset of the inquiry he set up, I am merely one among many who feel duped and angry in its wake," she wrote. 


"I thought long and hard about the possible consequences to my family of giving evidence and finally decided to do so because I have made every possible attempt to protect my children's privacy under the present system, and failed."


Rowling is concerned that members of the public who do not have the money to fight the press in the courts, over such abuses as invasion of privacy or libel, will continue to suffer.


"Those who have suffered the worst, most painful and least justifiable kinds of mistreatment at the hands of the press, people who have become newsworthy because of the press's own errors or through unspeakable private tragedy, are those least likely to be able to defend themselves or to seek proper redress," she said.



"Without statutory underpinning Leveson's recommendations will not work. We will be left with yet another voluntary system from which the press can walk away."



The author also questioned why millions of pounds had been spent on the inquiry if the prime minister did not intend to follow its recommendations -- and urged people to sign a petition set up by Hacked Off if they agreed.



The group has already collected more than 50,000 signatures from members of the public in support of the full implementation of Leveson's recommendations.



Cameron's decision caused immediate divisions within the country's coalition government.



Deputy Prime Minister Nick Clegg, who leads the Liberal Democrats in the coalition, said he believes new legislation is needed to ensure the regulator's long-term independence.



Ed Miliband, leader of the opposition Labour Party, also said he favors full implementation of Leveson's recommendations, including the new legislation.



In his report, Leveson said that he had no desire to jeopardize the freedom of the press, which he acknowledged plays a "vital" role in safeguarding the public interest, but that changes are needed to tackle abuses.



The British press has ignored its own code of conduct on "far too many occasions over the last decade," causing "real hardship" and sometimes wreaking "havoc with the lives of innocent people," Leveson said.



The independent inquiry was first announced by Cameron in July 2011 in response to public outrage over a newspaper phone-hacking scandal.



The trigger was the allegation that in 2002, the voice mail of a missing 13-year-old girl, Milly Dowler, had been hacked by an investigator working for the News of the World before she was found murdered. The furor led to the closure of the newspaper, run by News International, a subsidiary of the Murdoch-owned News Corp.



CNN's Per Nyberg contributed to this report.



 ™ & © 2012 Cable News Network, Inc., a Time Warner Company. All rights reserved. 



  

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