06-19-2018  5:38 am      •     
The Skanner Report
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NEWS BRIEFS

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OPINION

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AFRICAN AMERICANS IN THE NEWS

Border separations ripple through midterm campaigns

Wrenching scenes of migrant children being separated from their parents at the southern border are roiling campaigns ahead of midterm elections, emboldening Democrats on the often-fraught issue of immigration while forcing an increasing number of Republicans to break from President Donald Trump on...

Germany: Syrian teen on trial over anti-Semitic assault

BERLIN (AP) — A 19-year-old from Syria is on trial in Berlin over an assault in the German capital on an Israeli wearing a skullcap.The young man is charged with bodily harm and slander. The April 17 attack caused nationwide outrage and fueled concerns over anti-Semitism in Germany.German...

City where many slaves entered US to apologize for slavery

CHARLESTON, S.C. (AP) — The South Carolina city where almost half of all the slaves brought to the United States first set foot on American soil is ready to apologize for its role in the slave trade.The resolution expected to be passed by the Charleston City Council on Tuesday offers a...

ENTERTAINMENT

In 'Jurassic World,' a dino-sized animal-rights parable

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Immigration detention policy becomes major issue in media

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Adam Levine, Behati Prinsloo share baby photo

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U.S. & WORLD NEWS

Yemeni officials say fighting rages around Hodeida airport

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US could back 1st pot-derived medicine, and some are worried

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Army splits with West Point grad who touted communist revolt

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China hopes for implementation of NKorea-US summit outcome

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Twin brothers reunited 74 years after WWII death at Normandy

COLLEVILLE-SUR-MER, France (AP) — For decades, he was known only as Unknown X-9352 at a World War II...

France's Macron admonishes teenager; video goes viral

PARIS (AP) — A video of French President Emmanuel Macron strongly admonishing a teenager who called him by...

Greg Risling the Associated Press

LOS ANGELES (AP) -- An executive for the maker of a medical device used by Michael Jackson's doctor to monitor the singer told jurors on Friday that the equipment was not adequate for the continuous monitoring of patients.

The $275 fingertip device that monitors the pulse and blood oxygen levels was recovered after Jackson's death and was being used by Dr. Conrad Murray while he was giving the singer doses of the surgical anesthetic propofol.

Prosecutors called Nonin Medical executive Bob Johnson to try to show that Murray lacked enough equipment to care for the singer during the treatments. Propofol is normally administered in hospital settings.

Johnson said the model that Murray used had no audible alarm and was not intended to be used for the continuous monitoring of patients.

Murray, 58, has pleaded not guilty to a charge of involuntary manslaughter. If convicted, Murray could face up to four years in prison and lose his medical license.

A former patient of Murray lauded Murray's treatment of him, but testified Friday that his cardiologist became increasingly distant and hard to reach while working with Jackson.

"I felt like I was getting the best care in the world," said Robert Russell of Las Vegas.

Russell said he couldn't get answers about his own treatment from Murray's office on June 25, 2009 - the day Jackson died - and demanded to speak to the doctor.

The doctor left him a voicemail at 11:49 a.m. Prosecutors are using records to show that Murray was on the phone in the moments before he realized Jackson was unconscious.

Russell told jurors Murray's message seemed odd because the doctor said he was going on sabbatical, despite telling the salesman and his wife months earlier that he was going to work for Jackson.

Jurors are expected Friday to hear from paramedics who responded to the singer's rented mansion and tried to revive him.

Martin Blount and Richard Senneff had previously testified at a preliminary hearing that Murray never mentioned giving Jackson the powerful anesthetic propofol and told them the singer lost consciousness moments before an ambulance was called.

Both men believed the singer had died by the time they arrived, but Murray insisted Jackson be taken to a hospital for more resuscitation efforts.

The prosecution witnesses will likely provide jurors more insight into Jackson's final moments as futile attempts were made to revive the unresponsive superstar as the trial enters its fourth day.

On Thursday, a pair of Jackson staffers described the chaotic scene at the rented mansion.

Personal chef Kai Chase said she was preparing a spinach Cobb salad for Jackson when a panicked and flustered Murray came down a spiral staircase shouting for her to get security and the singer's son, Prince.

"His energy was very nervous and frantic," said Chase, who added she ran to get Jackson's son in a nearby room. "I said, `Hurry, Dr. Murray needs you. Something may be wrong with your father."

Chase said later she saw paramedics and security running upstairs to Jackson's bedroom where he lay and some of the house staff were crying, unsure of what was happening.

"The children were crying and screaming," she said. "We started hugging. We came together, held hands and we began to pray."

Bodyguard Alberto Alvarez said he went to help Jackson after the singer's assistant called him on his cellphone.

Shocked at seeing Jackson lying motionless in his bed, eyes slightly open, Alvarez barely had time to react when he heard the singer's daughter scream "Daddy!" from the doorway. He led her and Prince from the room, trying to comfort them.

Alvarez then said Murray told him to put vials of medicine he scooped from Jackson's nightstand into a bag. Alvarez complied and also placed an IV bag into another bag.

Alvarez's testimony was key for prosecutors who contend Murray, who has pleaded not guilty, was intent on concealing signs that he had been giving the singer doses of propofol as a sleep aid.

Alvarez said he thought Murray might be preparing to take the items to the hospital, but the bags never made it to the hospital and the bodyguard never questioned the doctor.

Defense attorney Ed Chernoff asked whether there was enough time for Alvarez to shield Jackson's children, survey the room and stow away the drugs in the brief period that phone records show he was in the home before calling emergency responders.

The bodyguard insisted there was, telling the attorney, "I'm very efficient, sir."

Chernoff was not convinced, questioning whether 30 seconds was enough time for the dramatic sequence to play out. Alvarez assured him there was.

The defense attorney also challenged Alvarez's recollection, asking whether the collection of the vials happened after paramedics had come and whisked Jackson to a nearby hospital. Alvarez denied it happened after he called 911.

Chernoff questioned why Alvarez didn't tell authorities about Murray's commands to bag up the medication immediately after Jackson died, but instead waited until two months after the singer's death. The bodyguard said he didn't realize its significance until seeing a news report in late June in which he recognized one of the bags detectives were carrying out of Jackson's mansion.

The burly Alvarez became emotional as the 911 call was played for jurors. Jackson's mother, Katherine, appeared distraught and her son, Randy, huddled next to her and put his arm around her.

"Was that difficult to hear?" prosecutor David Walgren asked.

"It is," Alvarez replied.

Alvarez's testimony allowed Walgren to present jurors directly with a bottle of propofol that they've heard much about throughout the previous two days of the trial.

Jurors intently looked at the bottle, which appeared to still contain some liquid.

Walgren asked whether anything good had happened to Alvarez as a result of his experience in Jackson's bedroom.

"No sir," Alvarez responded.

Media outlets reportedly offered him up to $500,000 for interviews, but Alvarez said he always refused. "It's caused a lot of financial problems," he said, starting to choke up. "I went from a great salary to hardly anything."

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AP Entertainment Writer Anthony McCartney contributed to this report

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Anthony McCartney can be reached at http://twitter.com/mccartneyAP

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