12-04-2021  6:27 am   •   PDX and SEA Weather
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NORTHWEST NEWS

Famously Soggy Seattle Sees Its Wettest Fall on Record

Seattle, a city known for soggy weather, has seen its wettest fall on record.

Longtime Oregon Rep. Peter DeFazio Won't Seek Reelection

DeFazio, the longest serving U.S. House member in Oregon’s history and a staunch advocate for environmental issues, said Wednesday he is retiring

Juneteenth Becomes Paid Holiday in Another Oregon County

Washington County Board has approved Juneteenth as a paid holiday for county employees

Sen. Manning on the Year Ahead and the Year That Was

Prominent BIPOC Caucus member concerned with gun regulation, access to Covid-19 testing

NEWS BRIEFS

Congressional Cannabis Caucus Co-Chairs Blumenauer, Joyce, Lee and Young Urge VA to Offer Veterans Access to Lifesaving Cannabis Treatment

“…over twenty veterans continue to die by suicide each day—it is past time we stop barring access from these innovative...

200+ Groups Call on Senate to Delay Recess to Pass Voting Rights

In a letter to the Senate, the group states, "We urge you to stay in session to do whatever it takes until these bills are passed...

Zeta Phi Beta Sorority's National Educational Foundation Awards Historic $125,000 Founders' Centennial Scholarship

Zeta Phi Beta Sorority Inc. and the Zeta National Educational Foundation Inc. announced that Janae Smith-Williams was awarded of the...

Oregon's Cannabis Industry Could Be More Vulnerable Than Ever

Portland is the first in the country to allocate cannabis tax revenue to relieve the industry's impacts of...

Open Enrollment Deadline Is Dec. 15 for Health Insurance Coverage Starting Jan. 1, 2022

Help applying and financial assistance is available through the Oregon Health Insurance Marketplace ...

Body discovered in suitcase inside car trunk, 1 arrested

SALEM, Ore. (AP) — One person was arrested after Salem Police found a suitcase in a car that contained a body. According to Salem Police, officers responded Thursday morning to the Claxter Court Apartments in north Salem after someone reported seeing a person move a large...

Australian company begins drilling for lithium in Oregon

VALE, Ore. (AP) — An Australian company has started drilling at a southeast Oregon site that could eventually host a large lithium mine. Mineral exploration company Jindalee Resources Ltd. announced this week that it’s working to determine the extent of a lithium deposit in...

No. 25 Arkansas beats Missouri, caps best season since 2011

FAYETTEVILLE, Ark. (AP) — Sam Pittman grinned for almost the entirety of his postgame press conference Friday night. The Arkansas coach and his team had done something no others ever had. The No. 25 Razorbacks capped their regular season with a 34-17 victory over Missouri,...

Mizzou's Drinkwitz returning to Arkansas for rivalry game

FAYETTEVILLE, Ark. (AP) — Just 45 miles of interstate highway separate Eli Drinkwitz from where he started and where he is now as Missouri's head football coach. Raised in the small Arkansas town of Alma, Drinkwitz will come full circle Friday when his Tigers visit No. 25...

OPINION

State is Painting Lipstick on Its One-of-a-kind, Long-term-care Law

Starting in January, the unpopular law imposes a stiff new tax of 58 cents per 0 earned for every worker in the state ...

Giving Thanks

Just by being alive we can be sure of having moments of sadness as well as happiness. When you’re active in politics, you experience both wins and losses. Sometimes it can be hard to feel grateful. ...

Acting on Climate will Require an Emphasis on Environmental Justice

Climate change affects us all, but its effects aren’t distributed equally. ...

Small Businesses Cannot Survive With Current Level of Postal Service

At The Skanner News office we received an important piece of correspondence that was postmarked June 12, 2021, and delivered to us on November 4, 2021. ...

AFRICAN AMERICANS IN THE NEWS

New Orleans: Push to rename Lee boulevard after Toussaint

NEW ORLEANS (AP) — A member of the New Orleans city council is pushing to change a street currently named after Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee and replace it with one the city's most famous musicians, Allen Toussaint, who died in 2015. Councilmember Jared C. Brossett...

Pipeline: Cascade of white owners has slowed NFL change

Over the past 100 years, around 110 people have owned controlling portions of NFL teams. Of that select group, all but two have been white. This basic head count might offer the simplest explanation for how, even with rules in place for nearly two decades that are designed to...

EXPLAINER: Who are the jurors for trial of Kim Potter?

MINNEAPOLIS (AP) — A look at the jurors who will hear testimony in the manslaughter trial of former suburban Minneapolis police officer Kim Potter, who is charged in the April shooting death of 20-year-old Black motorist Daunte Wright. Potter says she meant to use her Taser on Wright and drew her...

ENTERTAINMENT

Kelsea Ballerini feels her way through her new poetry book

New York (AP) — Country music star Kelsea Ballerini had no intentions of starting a new job as an author in 2020. She did plan to tour her new album, “Kelsea” — then the coronavirus pandemic shut down most of the world. As COVID-19 all but stopped the touring industry, the Grammy nominee...

Duggar trial focusing on computer where child porn was found

FAYETTEVILLE, Ark. (AP) — A computer used by Josh Duggar at work contained child pornography behind a partition that allowed the user to circumvent an application that monitors internet use, and metadata indicates the images were downloaded when the former reality TV star was working, computer...

State rests case at Smollett trial after star witnesses

CHICAGO (AP) — The state rested its case at Jussie Smollett's trial Thursday after key testimony from two brothers who said the former “Empire" actor plotted a racist and anti-gay attack on himself in downtown Chicago and paid them to carry it out. After a three-day...

U.S. & WORLD NEWS

The AP Interview: Scientist says omicron was a group find

JOHANNESBURG (AP) — The Botswana scientist who may well have discovered the omicron variant of the coronavirus...

Time is no ally as Dems strain to finish Biden's [scripts/homepage/home.php]T bill

WASHINGTON (AP) — If President Joe Biden's [scripts/homepage/home.php] trillion social and environment package was a Broadway show, its...

AP EXCLUSIVE: Afghan judges in Brazil still fear the Taliban

BRASILIA, Brazil (AP) — A female judge, Muska, was hiding with her family from newly empowered Taliban militants...

Struggling Chinese developer warns it could run out of money

BEIJING (AP) — A Chinese developer that is struggling under 0 billion in debt warned Friday it may run out of...

SKorea sets daily records for new coronavirus cases, deaths

SEOUL, South Korea (AP) — South Korea again broke its daily records for coronavirus infections and deaths and...

France's conservative party to choose presidential candidate

PARIS (AP) — Members of France’s main conservative party are picking their presidential candidate Saturday, a...

By The Skanner News | The Skanner News

SANAA, Yemen (AP) -- Authorities flooded the streets of Yemen's capital with 2,000 police Wednesday to try to halt six days of Egypt-style demonstrations against the president of 32 years, a key U.S. ally in battling al-Qaida. One person was killed when police and protesters clashed in the southern port of Aden in the first known death during Yemen's political unrest.

The police, including plainclothes officers, fired in the air and blocked thousands of students at Sanaa University from joining thousands of other protesters in the capital of the Arab world's most impoverished nation.

A call spread via Facebook and Twitter urging Yemenis to join a series of "One Million People" rallies on a so-called "Friday of Rage" in all Yemeni cities, seeking the ouster of President Ali Abdullah Saleh.

"We will remain in the streets until the regime departure," according to a statement posted on Facebook. Copies signed by a group named the Feb. 24 Movement were distributed among youth via e-mail. The group is taking that name because organizers hope to have their biggest protest on that day next week.

Taking inspiration from the toppling of autocratic leaders in Egypt and Tunisia, the protesters are demanding political reforms and Saleh's resignation, complaining of poverty, unemployment and corruption.

Saleh has tried to defuse protesters' anger amid the unprecedented street demonstrations by saying he will not run for another term in 2013 and that he will not seek to set up his son, Ahmed, to succeed him in the conflict-ridden and impoverished nation.

Protesters still chanted slogans against the president's son Wednesday.

Saleh has become a key U.S. partner in battling al-Qaida in the Arabian Peninsula, the terrorist network's offshoot in Yemen. The group's several hundred fighters have battled Saleh's U.S.-backed forces and have been linked to attacks beyond Yemen's borders, including the failed attempt to blow up a Detroit-bound airliner in December 2009. The U.S. military plans a $75 million training program with Yemen's counterterrorism unit to expand its size and capabilities in the nation's mountainous terrain.

It's a difficult balancing act for Saleh, who has been criticized as being too close to the United States.

Yemeni state TV reported that Saleh has been holding meetings since Sunday with heads of tribes to prevent them from joining the anti-government protests.

Witnesses said police chained Saana University's iron gates in order to prevent students from streaming into adjacent streets. They said at least four protesters were wounded in scuffles with police.

Demonstrations also took in the cities of Aden and in Taiz, where thousands shouted, "Down ... down with Ali Abdullah Saleh."

Riot police in Aden fired live ammunition, rubber bullets and tear gas in fierce clashes with thousands of demonstrators, and a security officer said a 23-year-old protester was killed when he was shot in the head.

Five others were wounded, at least one seriously, according to a medical official, who like the security officer spoke on condition of anonymity because they were not authorized to talk to the media.

The protesters, who included students and workers, set tires ablaze in the Mansoura district, witnesses said. Heavy gunfire rattled residents, and many closed their shops and stay home.

Protesters have been camping in Safir Square in central Taiz, about 270 miles south of Sanaa, saying they will not leave until Saleh steps down. Just like in Cairo's Tahrir Square, protesters have organized a makeshift camp in the city center, with medical teams, cleaning crews and security to protect them from outside attacks, said Ghazi al-Samie, a lawyer and activist.

Al-Samie said thousands have joined the protests in recent days in Yemen's second-biggest city.

About 120 judges held a protest in front of the Ministry of Justice in Sanaa, calling for an independent judiciary and better salaries. It was the first demonstration by judges in Yemen.

Saleh's government is weak - its control barely extends beyond the capital and is dependent on fragile alliances with powerful tribes - and it faces other serious challenges.

For more than six years, government forces have been battling a sporadic armed rebellion in the north. A secessionist movement by once-independent southern Yemen also is heating up.

Yemen's main source of income - oil - could run dry in a decade, and the country is also rapidly running out of water. Much of the population suffers from malnutrition.

Yemen has been the site of anti-U.S. attacks dating back to the 2000 bombing of the USS Cole in Aden harbor, which killed 17 American sailors. Radical U.S.-born cleric Anwar al-Awlaki, thought to be hiding in Yemen, is suspected of having inspired some attacks, including the deadly 2009 shooting rampage at Fort Hood, Texas.

 

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