01-20-2022  5:04 am   •   PDX and SEA Weather
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NORTHWEST NEWS

Washington Students' Test Scores Drop Significantly

Reports show that between 2019 and 2021, the overall percentage of students who met state standards on the math portion of the exam fell by 20 percentage points.

The Skanner Foundation Drum Major for Justice 2022 is Teressa Raiford

Through political campaigns, legal actions, founding the grassroots organizing group Don't Shoot Portland and through her fearless determination to speak up against racial injustice, Portland-born Teressa Raiford has made a lasting impression on our city and our state

Paid Workplace Training Internships Program Receives Support From City

Black, Latinx students receive skilled on-the-job training, career coaching, through POIC-RAHS program

Oregon Supreme Court OKs Dropping Bar Exam for Alternatives

The state’s highest court in a unanimous vote “expressed approval in concept” to a pair of alternative pathways designed for law students and postgraduates seeking admittance to the state bar

NEWS BRIEFS

Revamped TriMet Website Makes Planning Trips Easier With Map-Based Tools

Riders can now track real-time locations of buses and trains on their smartphone ...

PHOTOS: Founder of The American History Traveling Museum: The Unspoken Truths Honored

Delbert Richardson's Alpha Phi Alpha, Alpha XI Chapter fraternity brothers presented him a plaque that reads “Your commitment to...

St. Andrew Parish Announces 2022 Martin Luther King, Jr. Awards

Tony Jones was honored with the 2022 Parish Service Award, and the award for Community Service went to Terrance Moses ...

Culture + Trauma: An Artist Comes Home

An installation at the Alberta Arts Salon curated by Bobby Fouther is a visioning of the uncensored Black life. ...

MLK Day March Starts at Peninsula Park

Humboldt Neighborhood Association invites the public to participate in the March for Human Rights and Dignity in commemoration of the...

Lawsuit says new majority Latino district in WA a 'facade'

SEATTLE (AP) — A Latino civil rights organization and others filed a federal lawsuit Wednesday that says new political maps in Washington state approved by a bipartisan redistricting panel intentionally dilute Hispanic voters' influence. The legal action in the U.S. District Court...

Man pleads no contest to shooting that killed 1, wounded 2

ROSEBURG, Ore. (AP) — A Roseburg man pleaded no contest to second-degree murder and two counts of assault with a weapon in connection with a shooting outside a motel that killed one person and wounded two others. Devin McNamara, 34, entered the pleas in Douglas County Circuit Court...

UNLV promotes interim AD Harper to full-time job

LAS VEGAS (AP) — UNLV has promoted interim athletic director Erick Harper to serve in the job full time. Harper's hiring, announced on Monday, was effective Jan. 1. He had served as interim athletic director since Desiree Reed-Francois left UNLV for Missouri in August. ...

Army stuns Missouri in Armed Forces Bowl on last-second FG

FORT WORTH, Texas (AP) — Cole Talley kicked a 41-yard field goal as time expired and Army rallied to beat Missouri 24-22 in the Armed Forces Bowl on Wednesday night. After the Tigers took a 22-21 lead on a touchdown with 1:11 to play, third-string quarterback Jabari Laws led Army...

OPINION

OP-ED: A House Divided Against Itself Cannot Stand

January 6th, Voting Rights and the Tyranny Threatening America ...

Support Nikole Hannah-Jones and The 1619 Project

This important and ambitious project pulled back the curtain of euphemistic rhetoric composing American historiography that points only to the good in our history and sweeps under the rug the evil deeds perpetrated against people of color ...

In 2021, Organized Labor is Again Flexing its Muscles

We have seen dramatic change in the makeup of the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) under President Biden. ...

Study Reveals Racial Pay Gap for Social Media Influencers

The racial pay gap has long presented issues for African Americans in Corporate America and other industries. It’s now filtered to social media. ...

AFRICAN AMERICANS IN THE NEWS

Prosecutor: Norway mass killer still 'a very dangerous man'

OSLO, Norway (AP) — A prosecutor in Norway said Thursday that a far-right extremist who killed 77 people in 2011 still is “a very dangerous man” and therefore a poor candidate for release after 10 years in prison, as Norwegian law permits. On the final day of a three-day parole...

Democrats' elections bill offered voting changes and more

The sweeping elections bill that has collapsed in the Senate was about far more than voting. The Freedom to Vote: John R. Lewis Act would have created national automatic voter registration, allowed all voters to cast ballots by mail and weakened voter ID laws. It would have banned...

New approach to teaching race in school divides New Mexico

ALBUQUERQUE (AP) — A proposal to overhaul New Mexico’s social studies standards has stirred debate over how race should be taught in schools, with thousands of parents and teachers weighing in on changes that would dramatically increase instruction related to racial and social identity...

ENTERTAINMENT

Singer Fred Parris of the Five Satins dead at age 85

NEW YORK (AP) — Fred Parris, the lead singer of the 1950s harmony group the Five Satins and composer of the classic doo-wop ballad “In the Still of the Night,” has died at age 85. Parris died Jan. 13 after a brief illness, according to his music manager, Pat Marafiote. Parris...

HBO leads GLAAD Media Awards for LGBTQ representation

NEW YORK (AP) — HBO and HBO Max have become the top contenders at the GLAAD Media Awards with a combined 19 nominations, landing the bulk of its nods for its TV shows like “Hacks,” “The Other Two” and “The Sex Lives of College Girls.” The annual awards honors media for...

Review: Europe on the precipice in 'Munich — Edge of War'

When we last we saw George MacKay running, he was sprinting full-tilt across a World War I battlefield. In “1917,” the British actor played a soldier tasked with delivering a message that a soon-to-be-launched offensive is doomed to fail. In “Munich — Edge of War," the year...

U.S. & WORLD NEWS

Lebanon's poorest scavenge through trash to survive

BEIRUT (AP) — In the dark streets of a Beirut now often without electricity, sometimes the only light that...

Voting bill collapses, Democrats unable to change filibuster

WASHINGTON (AP) — Voting legislation that Democrats and civil rights leaders say is vital to protecting...

EXPLAINER: The federal charges against 3 cops in Floyd death

MINNEAPOLIS (AP) — Three former officers who were with Derek Chauvin during the arrest that led to George...

EXPLAINER: How UK Conservatives can change their leader

LONDON (AP) — Some Conservative lawmakers in Britain are talking about ousting their leader, Prime Minister...

Slovenia's president to set general election for April 24

LJUBLJANA, Slovenia (AP) — Slovenia is set to hold a parliamentary election on April 24, the president said...

Judges didn't consider 'wisdom' of deporting Novak Djokovic

MELBOURNE, Australia (AP) — Three Australian Federal Court judges on Thursday revealed their reasons for backing...

By Shernay Williams for the NNPA from Afro-American Newspapers

A week before Maryland state legislators were set to consider whether medical marijuana should be legal in Maryland, television personality Montel Williams came to Annapolis to voice his support.
"[Marijuana] is the only thing that has kept me a contributing member of this society for the last 10 years," he told reporters at a press conference Jan. 24th.
Williams, a Baltimore native, suffers from multiple sclerosis. He says marijuana is the only drug that eases his daily neuropathic pain, noting that traditional painkillers have stopped working. Others suffering from chronic illnesses shouldn't be labeled as criminals for attempting to manage their pain, he added.
The 54-year-old said he is willing to return to Maryland to help administer regulations, if lawmakers legalize the drug for patient use.
"I will help you put together the regulations that you are going to need to put together to stop making the mistakes that other states have made, and help you form a system that patients can get off the battlefield and start living a life like everybody else," Williams said, holding back tears.
"This is about relieving suffering and doing it in a responsible way," Delegate Dan Morhaim, of Baltimore County, a supporter of the bill, told the AFRO.
Morhaim, the General Assembly's only physician, said Williams' situation is common. "There are conditions that for some patients, responsible, careful doses [of the drug] work," he said.
He and several other lawmakers will introduce legislation legalizing medical marijuana next week. The proposal, which has bipartisan support, allows doctors to prescribe the drug to patients suffering from a narrow list of conditions only if the effectiveness of other medicines have been exhausted. The patient may then register with the state and obtain the drug from an authorized grower. A similar measure passed the state Senate last year but stalled in the House of Delegates.
Under current state law, residents found using marijuana for medicinal purposes are still charged with a criminal offense, but may receive a reduced penalty.
"In the war on drugs, let's at least get the sick and dying off the battlefield," Morhaim said.
After leaving Maryland, Williams reportedly stopped in Delaware to urge that state's lawmakers to also legalize the drug, according to media outlets. Medical marijuana is legal in fifteen states and the District of Columbia.
The talk show host and Navy veteran lives in New York and is a "card-carrying member" in two states that allow medical marijuana, according to the Associated Press.

The Skanner Foundation's Martin Luther King, Jr. Breakfast

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