02-18-2020  9:10 pm   •   PDX Weather    •   SEA weather  
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NORTHWEST NEWS

Rep. Blumenauer Joined by Sens. Markey, Sanders, and Warren to Introduce Bill to Hold Big Oil Companies Accountable

"Amidst the growing climate emergency, closing this loophole is a small step we must take to hold Big Oil accountable and to protect our communities," said Blumenauer. 

Trump Appointees Weigh Plan to Build Pipeline in Oregon

If the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission approves the project, which lacks state permits, it would likely set up a court battle over state's rights

Oregon Lawmakers Ask U.S. Attorney to Investigate Whether Local Police Violated Black Man’s Civil Rights

U.S. Sens. Ron Wyden and Jeff Merkley and U.S. Rep. Earl Blumenauer said this racial targeting of Michael Fesser "reflects the worst abuses of African-Americans in our nation’s modern history"

DA to Investigate West Linn Cops Handling of Wrongful Arrest

Former West Linn Police Chief Terry Timeus had his officers initiate an unwarranted, racially motivated surveillance and arrest of a Black Portland man as a favor to the chief’s fishing buddy

NEWS BRIEFS

Wednesday, February 19 Will Be Declared 'Rip City Day'

Ceremony at City Hall will honor the rich history of the organization ...

Seattle Pacific University Hosts Music Events

Seattle Pacific University invites the public to a series of free music events during the months of February and March ...

A Celebration of Portland’s Role in the Negro Leagues to be Held Thursday, Feb. 20

The community is invited for a celebration of Black History Month and the 100th anniversary of Negro League Baseball in America ...

Kresge Foundation Selects PCC To Participate in Its National Boost Initiative

The $495,000 grant awarded to PCC and Albina Head Start will help connect low-income residents and students to services and...

Attorney Jamila Taylor Announces Run for State House of Representatives in Washington

Taylor pledges to continue outgoing Rep. Pellicciotti’s commitment to open, accountable government in a statement released today ...

Immigration agency subpoenas Oregon county over 2 inmates

PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) — U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement subpoenaed a sheriff's office in the suburbs of Portland, Oregon, on Tuesday for information about two Mexican citizens wanted for deportation, a move that is part of a broader escalation of the conflict between federal officials...

16-year-old Oregon student dies from flu complications

COOS BAY, Ore. (AP) — A 16-year-old student at a Coos Bay high school has died due to complications of Influenza B, officials said.Coos Bay Public Schools Superintendent Bryan Trendell said in a statement that the student at Marshfield High School had died early Monday morning, The World...

OPINION

Black America is Facing a Housing Crisis

As the cost of housing soars the homeless population jumps 12 percent, the number of people renting grows and homeownership falls ...

Trump Expands Muslim Ban to Target Africans

Under the new ban on countries, four out of five people who will be excluded are Africans ...

Martin Luther King Day is an Opportunity for Service

Find out where you can volunteer and make a difference to the community ...

Looking to 2020 — Put Your Vote to WORK!

Ronald Reagan, who turned his back on organized labor and started America’s middle-class into a tailspin, has recently been voted by this administration’s NLRB into the Labor Hall of Fame ...

AFRICAN AMERICANS IN THE NEWS

The Latest: Klobuchar revisits flub about Mexico's leader

LAS VEGAS (AP) — The Latest on the 2020 presidential campaign (all times local):7:35 p.m.Amy Klobuchar is trying to make amends for not being able to name Mexico’s president recently -- but she's still making a small mistake.The Minnesota senator was unable to name Mexican President...

Cincinnati coach Ron Jan forced out after racist comments

CINCINNATI (AP) — Cincinnati head coach Ron Jans was forced out after an investigation by Major League Soccer found he'd used a racial slur in the locker room and made other troubling comments.Jans resigned under late Monday after the team notified him he couldn't continue as coach. Jans had...

Group urges court to overturn Harvard admissions case ruling

BOSTON (AP) — A group that opposes affirmative action urged a federal appeals court Tuesday to overturn a ruling that cleared Harvard University of discriminating against Asian American applicants. Students for Fair Admissions has accused the Ivy League college of deliberating holding down...

ENTERTAINMENT

'Sonic' speeds to M debut; 'Parasite' sees big Oscar bump

NEW YORK (AP) — The redesigned “Sonic the Hedgehog” showed plenty of teeth at the box office, speeding to a million debut, according to studio estimates Sunday, while “Parasite” saw one of the largest post-Oscars bumps in years following its best picture win....

'Fresh Off the Boat' leaving indelible mark on TV landscape

Even before “Fresh Off the Boat” hit the airwaves on ABC in February 2015, the show was facing pressure that other new shows weren't. It was set to be the first network TV comedy with an all-Asian cast since Margaret Cho's “All-American Girl” premiered 20 years earlier....

Jury ends 1st day of deliberations in Weinstein's rape trial

NEW YORK (AP) — Jurors in Harvey Weinstein’s rape trial ended their first day of deliberations Tuesday with lots of questions and no verdict in the landmark #MeToo case that could put the once-powerful Hollywood producer behind bars for the rest of his life.The panel of seven men and...

U.S. & WORLD NEWS

'Good Times' Ja'Net DuBois dies; co-wrote 'Jeffersons' theme

LOS ANGELES (AP) — Ja’Net DuBois, who played the vivacious neighbor Willona Woods on “Good...

Blaney's attempted push of Newman led to violent crash

DAYTONA BEACH, Fla. (AP) — Drafting, blocking and bumping are essential elements of racing on NASCAR's...

Soggy neighborhoods under flash-flood warning in Mississippi

RIDGELAND, Miss. (AP) — Forecasters expected more heavy rains in parts of the flood-ravaged South on...

France to end imam, teacher deals to counter extremism

MULHOUSE, France (AP) — French President Emmanuel Macron on Tuesday announced measures intended to counter...

Russia and Turkey agree on more talks on Syria amid crisis

ANKARA, Turkey (AP) — Talks between Russia and Turkey meant to reduce tensions in northwestern Syria did...

UK unveils immigration overhaul for 2021 focused on skills

LONDON (AP) — Britain announced new post-Brexit immigration rules Tuesday that will make it tougher for...

McMenamins
Holbrooke Mohr the Associated Press

Jamie and Gladys Scott were released from a state prison just east of Jackson, and they plan to head to Pensacola, Fla., where their mother and children live, Corrections Commissioner Chris Epps said.

Gladys Scott's release order requires her to donate a kidney to her sister, who is suffering from kidney failure and requires dialysis.

Chokwe Lumumba, the sisters' attorney, said he spoke by phone to Gladys Scott Thursday and she was thrilled by news.

``We're riding high right now,'' Lumumba said. ``Their spirits are good and they are ready to get out of there.''

Their freedom will allow not only for a reunion with family, but also with each other. The two women have been held in different parts of the Central Mississippi Correctional Facility in Pearl for at least the past few years, and it's unlikely they had much interaction in the sprawling complex of 13 housing units on 171 acres.

Epps said the sisters will be allowed to take whatever personal property they have with them and any money they have in their inmate accounts. He said the state also will supply them with 30 days of medication. Jamie Scott was scheduled to have a dialysis treatment Thursday at the prison.

Epps said once the sisters are in Florida, local probation officials will take over their case.

Jo Ellyn Rackleff, a spokeswoman for the Florida Department of Corrections, said the women are expected to report to a Pensacola office Monday.

Their surroundings in Pensacola will be a far cry from the tall fences and concertina wire that wrap the perimeter of the prison along a rural state road near a police academy and mental hospital. The facility houses male and female inmates under conditions ranging from minimum- to maximum-security.

The Scotts were convicted in 1994 of leading two men into an ambush in central Mississippi the year before. The robbery didn't net much; amounts cited have ranged from $11 to $200.

Mitchell Duckworth, one of the women's victims, told The Associated Press in a phone interview Thursday that he believes the sisters planned the robbery. He remembered it as a terrifying experience in which he was assaulted with a shotgun, and said he's thankful to be alive.

``I just really don't even want to think about that anymore,'' he said.

Still, Duckworth said, he thinks the women have served enough time for the crime and wasn't concerned with them being released.

``I think it's all right as long as they've been there,'' Duckworth said.

After 16 years in prison, Jamie Scott, 36, is on dialysis, which officials say costs the state about $200,000 a year.

Gov. Haley Barbour agreed to release her because of her medical condition, but 38-year-old Gladys Scott's release order says one of the conditions she must meet is to donate the kidney within one year.

The idea to donate the kidney was Gladys Scott's, and she volunteered to do it in her petition for early release.

A few doctors have expressed an interest in performing the kidney transplant, but there are no firm plans yet, Lumumba said. The women will need to get on Medicaid to cover the expenses of treatment, he added.

They'll also need to undergo testing to make sure they are compatible. The women are a blood type match, but they'll also need to be a tissue match, the governor's office has said.

Some medical experts said the arrangement raises legal and ethical concerns, but National NAACP President and CEO Benjamin Todd Jealous, who championed the women's cause, has called Barbour's decision ``a shining example'' of the way a governor should use the power of clemency.

The Scott sisters' attorney and advocacy groups have long cited $11 as the amount taken in the robbery, though there's been some dispute about exactly how much was stolen. The lower amount has been used to illustrate that the crime did not merit the life sentences the women received.

However, one of the victims in the case testified that he was robbed of about $200. A 14-year-old boy involved in the crime testified that his cut was between $9 and $11. Lumumba says the $11 amount trumpeted by advocacy groups is based on the indictment, which says they stole ``in excess of $10.''

Whatever the case, the sisters' supporters say the life sentences were excessive. The sisters are black, and their case has been a cause celebre in the state's African-American community.

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