08-09-2022  7:22 pm   •   PDX and SEA Weather
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4

NORTHWEST NEWS

White Woman Calls Police on Black Man Standing at His Home

“If you guys have a lease, I’d just like to see the lease,”

Oregon's Wildfire Risk Map Emerges as New Climate Flashpoint

A new map in Oregon that rated the wildfire risk of every tax lot in the state — labeling nearly 80,000 structures as high-risk — generated so much pushback from angry homeowners that officials abruptly retracted it

Seattle Ends COVID Hazard Pay for Grocery Store Workers

A policy passed in 2021 requiring grocery stores pay employees an additional per hour in hazard pay has just come to an end

Washington Voters Weigh in on Dozens of State Primary Races

Voters were deciding the top two candidates in races for the U.S. Senate, Congress and the secretary of state's office.

NEWS BRIEFS

Washington Ferries to Get $38 Million to Improve Services

Out of the 35 states and three territories receiving federal money for ferries, Washington will get the biggest allocation ...

Personal Information of Some in Jails Possibly Compromised

A statement from the county said names, dates of birth and photos — as well as medical information like diagnoses and treatments —...

Bicycle and Pedestrian Lane Reduction on Morrison Bridge Starts Next Week

The bicycle and pedestrian lanes will be reduced to seven feet to allow for painting crew and equipment. ...

King County Elections to Open Six Vote Centers for the Primary Election

Voters who need to register to vote, get a replacement ballot, or use an assistive device are encouraged to visit Vote Centers on...

Eugene Restaurant Owner Keeps All Tips Workers Earn, Uses Them to Pay Wages

The U.S. Department of Labor Wage and Hour Division found Ji Li, owner of Bao Bao House in Eugene, Oregon violated the Fair Labor...

WA GOP House member who voted to impeach Trump concedes

OLYMPIA, Wash. (AP) — Rep. Jaime Herrera Beutler, one of two Republican members of Washington’s congressional delegation who voted to impeach Donald Trump, has conceded her reelection bid after being overtaken in late vote tallies by a GOP challenger endorsed by the former president. ...

Republicans shut of out Washington Secretary of State race

OLYMPIA, Wash. (AP) — Until Democratic state Sen. Steve Hobbs was appointed as Washington’s secretary of state last November, Republicans had a hold on the office for 56 years. Now, they've been shut out of the general election. Hobbs captured about 40% of the vote and easily...

OPINION

Betsy Johnson Fails to Condemn Confederate Flags at Her Rally

The majority of Oregonians, including our rural communities, value inclusion and unity, not racism and bigotry. ...

Monkeypox, Covid, and Your Vote

We must start a voter registration drive right here where we live. This effort must become as important to us as putting food on the table and a roof over our heads. ...

Speaking of Reparations

To many Americans, “reparations” is a dirty word when applied to Black folks. ...

Improving Healthcare for Low-Income Americans Through Better Managed Care

Many should recognize that health equity – or ensuring that disadvantaged populations get customized approaches to care and better medical outcomes – is a top priority. ...

AFRICAN AMERICANS IN THE NEWS

Missouri family says racism led to pool party cancellation

LEE'S SUMMIT, Mo. (AP) — A Black family says racism prompted officials at a suburban Kansas City water park to cancel a private pool party for their 17-year-old son's birthday during the weekend. Chris Evans said he signed a contract with Summit Waves Aquatic Facility in Lee's...

Lutheran bishop issues public apology to Latino congregation

Elizabeth A. Eaton, presiding bishop of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America, issued a public apology Tuesday to members of a majority Latino immigrant congregation for the pain and trauma they endured after the predominantly white denomination’s first openly transgender bishop unexpectedly...

8 minority jail officers settle suit over guarding Chauvin

ST. PAUL, Minn. (AP) — Eight minority corrections officers who were working at the jail where a former Minneapolis police officer was awaiting trial in the death of George Floyd were awarded nearly jumi.5 million Tuesday to settle a lawsuit. The officers filed the racial...

ENTERTAINMENT

New this week: 'Day Shift' and 'Five Days at Memorial'

Here’s a collection curated by The Associated Press’ entertainment journalists of what’s arriving on TV, streaming services and music platforms this week. MOVIES — One of the best movies of the year is finally streaming. “Belle,” Mamoru Hosoda's tour-de-force...

David McCullough, Pulitzer-winning historian, dies at 89

NEW YORK (AP) — David McCullough, the Pulitzer Prize-winning author whose lovingly crafted narratives on subjects ranging from the Brooklyn Bridge to Presidents John Adams and Harry Truman made him among the most popular and influential historians of his time, has died. He was 89. ...

'P-Valley' explores Black strip club culture, gay acceptance

LOS ANGELES (AP) — When Katori Hall first pitched the idea to convert her popular play about Black strip club culture into the television series “P-Valley,” the Pulitzer Prize winner was either quickly rejected after meeting with networks or denied before she could fully explain the concept. ...

U.S. & WORLD NEWS

Biden, Democrats bet on long-term goals for short-term boost

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden’s legislative victories have aimed to position the U.S. to “win the...

AP PHOTOS: Serena Williams, the athlete and cultural icon

After winning 23 Grand Slam titles, Serena Williams says she is turning her focus to having another child and her...

FBI's search of Trump's Florida estate: Why now?

WASHINGTON (AP) — The FBI’s unprecedented search of former President Donald Trump’s Florida residence...

Hamas issues, then rescinds, sweeping rules on Gaza coverage

TEL AVIV, Israel (AP) — Gaza’s militant Hamas rulers issued sweeping new restrictions on journalists after the...

In reversal, Brazil court reopens case of rainforest park

RIO DE JANEIRO (AP) — After declaring the decision final, a state court backpedaled Monday and reopened a...

Rescuers to move whale stranded in French river to saltwater

PARIS (AP) — French environmentalists prepared Tuesday to move a beluga whale that strayed into the Seine River...

Shelia Byrd the Associated Press

Emmett Till



For years, the auburn-haired white man has educated students about activists in their own state who led peaceful demonstrations, and the wrath of segregationists who channeled violence to repress social change.

Soon, civil rights lessons be will required for students from kindergarten to 12th grade all across Mississippi.

A civil rights/human rights curriculum becomes mandatory in all public schools for the 2011-2012 school year, five years after Gov. Haley Barbour signed the requirement into law.

Civil rights is typically a part of social studies programs in the nation's public schools. State officials believe Mississippi is the first state to require civil rights studies throughout all grades in its public school systems. Mississippi education officials say the change took some time to implement because they waited to include it in the revision of the social studies framework that was scheduled for 2011.

Barbour said he sees the value in the new curriculum.

``To not know history is to repeat it. And to learn the good things about Mississippi and America and the bad things about Mississippi and America is important for every Mississippian,'' Barbour said when asked about the curriculum during an interview with The Associated Press in December.

Barbour's comments earlier this month came just days before he stumbled into a controversy stemming from his own recollection of civil rights history. In a profile in the Weekly Standard magazine, Barbour made favorable comments about the White Citizens Council in his hometown, calling it an anti-Ku Klux Klan group.

Several liberal bloggers said Barbour left an inaccurate impression of Mississippi's local Citizens Councils, which sought to thwart integration in many areas.

Barbour has since backtracked, saying he was not trying to downplay the pain that many endured during the South's segregation era.

Paola, who teaches at predominantly-black Hattiesburg High School, is among those who believe civil rights lessons may have been given short-shrift for decades in a state where 50 percent of public school students are black and 46 percent are white.

``Certain issues are still taboo,'' said Paola, 38. ``It depends on your demographics. You teach to them, I suppose.''

To ensure civil rights are taught in the schools, the state has made the subject part of an assessment test students must pass for graduation.

Perry Overstreet, 17, said studying civil rights in Paola's class had an impact on him.

Overstreet said he recently visited Glendora, the Delta town where black 14-year-old Emmett Till was taken by two white men in 1955 and his body dumped in the Tallahatchie River.

Because he had learned about Till, Overstreet said he was able to seek out landmarks associated with the case that sparked outrage and fueled the movement.

``It really opened my eyes to civil rights,'' said Overstreet. ``Mississippi has come a long way from back then.''

Paola helped write the new curriculum, which had support from the Winter Institute for Racial Reconciliation at the University of Mississippi. Paola believes the change is needed because ``every year the movement itself loses momentum.''

``What I find in this level of class, they know who the people are, but they don't understand the story. They're old enough to see racism on the street. They get angry. I love when they get angry. It really pushes the nonviolent discussion,'' Paola said.

Derrick Johnson, president of the Mississippi NAACP, said the curriculum will help students better understand current political issues.

``In many cases, what we see today concerning the treatment of undocumented workers is very reminiscent of the treatment of African Americans during and before the Civil Rights Movement,'' Johnson said.

Not everyone is pleased with the new civil rights emphasis.

Rep. John Moore, R-Brandon, has filed a bill to repeal the law nearly every year since 2006. Moore, who lives in a suburb of Jackson, said he wants to know who will write the textbooks and craft the materials students will be taught.

``I want schools to be teaching my grandchildren to read, write a complete sentence and do math,'' Moore said. ``I just want to make sure it's teaching the truth and facts and not being accusatory of one group of people or the other. I don't want it to be somebody's philosophical idea of what civil rights are.''

The state Department of Education hasn't found another state with framework that incorporates civil rights studies in grades K-12, said Chauncey Spears, who works in the Mississippi agency's curriculum and instruction office.

Spears said school districts can tailor their textbook orders to support what will be taught, and some resources could be donated. The course work might also include visits to historic sites, and veteran activists will be asked to speak with classes.

``In kindergarten, you won't talk about community organizing, but you'll talk about issues of relationship or respect and then it progresses from that,'' Spears said.

In DeSoto County, an affluent school district not far from Memphis, Tenn., school officials say they're eager to begin.

``With our proximity to Memphis and access to resources such as the Civil Rights Museum, our students can not only learn about an important era in our nation's history, but they can also learn a great deal about the history of this region,'' said Jennifer Weeks, the district's associate superintendent of curriculum.

Photo Gallery

Photos and slide shows of local events