10-02-2022  12:25 pm   •   PDX and SEA Weather
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NORTHWEST NEWS

Tiny Oregon Town Hosts 1st Wind-Solar-Battery 'Hybrid' Plant

A renewable energy plant being commissioned in Oregon combines solar power, wind power and massive batteries to store the energy generated there is the first utility-scale plant of its kind in North America.

State Senator Weighs in on Lottery Issues

Sen. James Manning of Eugene voices concerns about the Lottery’s special treatment of two of its managers

Oregon Gubernatorial Candidates Clash Over Guns, Abortion

Three candidates clashed over gun control, abortions and the homeless crisis, just six weeks before election day.

Black United Fund Launches Emerging Entrepreneur Program

Pilot program will support promising small business owner ready to take the next step.

NEWS BRIEFS

Linfield University Hosts “a Night With Syncopated Ladies”

On Oct. 5, Chloe Arnold’s Syncopated Ladies will raise the roof of Linfield University’s Richard and Lucille Ice Auditorium. ...

Sunday Marathon Will Impact Downtown Bridges

The Portland Marathon on Sunday, October 2 will impact traffic on several Willamette River bridges maintained by Multnomah...

1st Civil Trial Over Portland Cops’ Use of Force Begins

Civil rights attorneys are paying close attention because the outcome could answer questions about the potential liability the city...

Council Approves Dunn’s Proposal to Expand Hate Crime Reporting System

The King County Council approved legislation that will create a new community-based Stop Hate Hotline and online portal, expanding...

Expiring Protections: 10-Day Notices of Nonpayment of Rent And "Safe Harbor" Protections

Effective October 1, a Landlord will be able to resume use of a 72-hour notice or 144-hour notice when issuing a termination notice...

Hundreds of cars pack Nevada streets for illegal stunts

RENO, Nev. (AP) — Thousands of people in hundreds of cars took over northern Nevada parking lots and intersections Friday night and into Saturday, performing stunts in souped-up vehicles and leading to crashes and arrests, police said. Police beefed up nighttime staffing after...

Oregon issues [scripts/homepage/home.php].7M fine to electric charging company

PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) — Oregon environmental regulators have issued a [scripts/homepage/home.php].7 million fine to an electric charging company over accusations it sold fraudulent credits through the agency’s clean fuels program. The Oregon Department of Environmental Quality said Friday it discovered...

AP Top 25 Takeaways: Bleak outlooks for Oklahoma, Wisconsin

Can't hide problems when conference play starts. The second month of the college football season often reveals issues that nonconference play might have masked and which teams could be in for long seasons. Things have quickly gotten bleak for No. 18 Oklahoma and...

No. 1 Georgia rallies from 10 down to beat Missouri 26-22

COLUMBIA, Mo. (AP) — The two most important characteristics that Georgia coach Kirby Smart seeks in his team are composure and resiliency, and the top-ranked Bulldogs needed to rely on both to rally past Missouri on Saturday night. Or, as Smart put it: “We had to OD on those.” ...

OPINION

No Room for Black Folk

A recent interview with Dr. Ebony Elizabeth Thomas and an associate professor, reveals the inability of certain white Americans to share the benefits of our society ...

The Cruelty of Exploiting Vulnerable People for Political Advantage

There is always a new low for Trump Republicans. And that is pretty frightening. ...

The Military to American Youth: You Belong to Me

The U.S. military needs more than just money in its annual budget. It needs access to America’s young people as well — their wallets, their bodies, and their minds. ...

Financial Fairness at Risk With Proposed TD Bank-First Horizon Merger

As banks grow larger through mergers and focus on growing online and mobile services, serious concerns emerge on how fair and how accessible banking will be to traditionally underserved Black and Latino communities. ...

AFRICAN AMERICANS IN THE NEWS

Latvian premier's center-right party wins national election

HELSINKI (AP) — Latvia's ruling center-right party won the most votes in the country's general election, centrist parties were the runners-up and pro-Moscow parties crashed in a vote that was shaped by Russia’s war in Ukraine, according to results published Sunday. With over 99%...

Mormon leader calls abuse 'abomination' amid policy scrutiny

SALT LAKE CITY (AP) — Russell M. Nelson, the president of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, told members of the faith on Saturday that abuse was “a grievous sin” that shouldn't be tolerated and would bring down the wrath of God on perpetrators. Though the leader...

Latvia's centrists are predicted to win national vote

HELSINKI (AP) — Latvia held a general election Saturday amid divisions over Russia's attack on Ukraine among the Baltic country’s sizable ethnic-Russian minority. An exit poll predicted that the center-right will win the most votes but whoever forms the next government will face huge...

ENTERTAINMENT

Judd sisters on mom Naomi, redemption, advocacy and grief

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — The family of the late country music matriarch Naomi Judd is reflecting on her legacy ahead of an 11-city tour that will give fans a chance to say goodbye and rejoice in the music that became the soundtrack of their lives. Daughters Wynonna Judd and Ashley...

'Svengoolie' horror host Rich Koz gets a Halloween tribute

LOS ANGELES (AP) — Rich Koz is keeping the grandly eccentric tradition of the horror movie host alive on MeTV's “Svengoolie” and can count Mark Hamill, Joe Mantegna and, just maybe, Lady Gaga among his fans. But it's a compliment he received from Rick Baker, a seven-time Oscar...

Trevor Noah says he's exiting as host of 'The Daily Show'

NEW YORK (AP) — Trevor Noah says that he's leaving “The Daily Show” as host, after seven years of a Trump and pandemic-filled tenure on the weeknight Comedy Central show. Noah surprised the studio audience during Thursday's taping, dropping the news after discussing his...

U.S. & WORLD NEWS

Man accused of killing 22 older women goes on trial again

DALLAS (AP) — After Mary Brooks was found dead on the floor of her Dallas-area condo, grocery bags from a...

EXPLAINER: 3 more on trial in Michigan governor kidnap plot

JACKSON, Mich. (AP) — A scheme to kidnap Michigan's governor in 2020 will get yet another airing in a different...

Amid crises, rural roots anchor Southern Baptists’ president

FARMERSVILLE, Texas (AP) — On the first Saturday of fall, a sweating Bart Barber trekked across a weedy pasture...

In Brazilian Amazon, a 1,000-mile voyage so people can vote

MANAUS, Brazil (AP) — In most democracies, citizens go to the polls. But in Brazil’s sparsely populated Amazon...

Denmark says Nord Stream 1 pipelines stop leaking

HELSINKI (AP) — Authorities in Denmark said Sunday that the Nord Stream 1 natural gas pipelines have also...

Glitzy Valentino show sees Paris Fashion Week at fever pitch

PARIS (AP) — Valentino’s Paris fashion show on Sunday saw black cars snared for blocks dropping off battalions...

The Skanner News and the Associated Press

Senate Votes to Repeal 'Don't Ask Don't Tell'
The Senate voted Saturday by a majority of  65 to 31, to repeal the Clinton-era law, known as "don't ask, don't tell." Eight Republicans voted with Democrats to overturn the policy, criticized as government-sanctioned discrimination against gay and lesbian troops. The Skanner news Video
President Obama, who had pledged to reverse the ban said,  "As commander in chief, I am also absolutely convinced that making this change will only underscore the professionalism of our troops as the best led and best trained fighting force the world has ever known."
Word that the world's largest military power will allow gays and lesbians to serve openly in the military brought strong and swift reaction Saturday, with supporters declaring a civil rights milestone and detractors insisting it would weaken and divide the armed forces.

In New York, home to one of the nation's largest gay communities and a gay pride parade whose grand marshal this year was an openly gay, discharged serviceman, 28-year-old Cassandra Melnikow glanced at a news ticker in Times Square announcing the repeal and said: "Excellent! It's about time."

"I don't see what difference (sexual orientation) makes in the fighting military," said Melnikow, a public health researcher. "What's the big deal?"

President Barack Obama had made repealing "don't ask, don't tell" a campaign promise in 2008, and rounding up a filibuster-proof majority in the Senate was a historic victory for him. By the time President Bill Clinton proposed allowing gays to serve in the military in 1993, they had been explicitly barred from military service since World War I.

Foes of lifting the ban argued that the military shouldn't be used to expand the rights of gays and that allowing them to serve openly would hurt troop morale and a unit's ability to fight — the same arguments used against women and blacks.

In the end, Congress agreed to let gays serve only if their sexual orientation remained secret.

Repeal means that for the first time in U.S. history, gays will be openly accepted by the military and can acknowledge their sexual orientation without fear of being discharged. More than 13,500 service members have been dismissed under the 1993 law.

The change wouldn't take immediate effect, however. The legislation says the president and his top military advisers must certify that lifting the ban won't hurt troops' fighting ability. After that, there's a 60-day waiting period for the military.

Conservative organizations said the vote didn't reflect the sentiments of rank-and-file military members and should not have taken place so close to the end of the current session of Congress.

"The issue that really disturbs me more than anything else is that legislation that's controversial tends to be done in lame-duck sessions when a number of the elected representatives are no longer accountable to the people," said Len Deo, president of the New Jersey Family Policy Council.

The Massachusetts Family Institute said Republican senators who voted for the measure broke a promise they had made not to vote on the repeal until the federal budget was resolved.

"In doing so, they not only have put special interests above fiscal interests but also have put our troops at risk during wartime," said Kris Mineau, the group's president.

Some supporters of the repeal traveled to Washington to witness the vote, including Sue Fulton, a former Army captain and company commander who is spokeswoman for Knights Out, a group of 92 gay and lesbian West Point graduates who are out and no longer serving

Driving back home to North Plainfield, N.J., the 51-year-old Fortune 500 executive told The Associated Press that she thinks the repeal will have an effect on the civil rights of gays in America.

"As more people realize that gay and lesbian citizens are risking their lives to defend this country, perhaps they'll be more willing to acknowledge gays and lesbians as full citizens in other ways," she said.

Others monitored the vote from afar.

Several gay service veterans and others supporting the repeal stood around a small computer screen to watch C-SPAN coverage of the vote at San Francisco's Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Community Center. They erupted in cheers as the final tally was read.

Zoe Dunning, a retired U.S. Navy commander who continued to serve after declaring she was gay, cried and hugged other supporters.

"I'm living proof that the mere presence of an openly gay person in your unit does not harm either cohesion or morale," she said. "After 18 years working on this, I witnessed the end to this destructive policy, and these are tears of joy... I'm so happy to be present for this day that I'd always dreamed of."

Warren Arbury of Savannah, Ga., served in the Army for seven years, including three combat tours, before being kicked out two years ago under "don't ask, don't tell." But he said he planned to re-enlist once the policy is officially abolished.

"As soon as they give me the go, I'm going to march into the recruiter's office," he said. "And I want retroactive pay and rank."

Arbury said a fight for other social changes — such as allowing gays to marry and easing obstacles they face in adopting and raising children — still lies ahead, however.

"I think it's one step in a very long process of becoming an equal rights citizen," he said. "Even though this is really huge, I look at it as a chink in a very, very long chain."

Aaron Belkin, director of the California-based Palm Center — a think tank on the issue — said the vote "ushers in a new era in which the largest employer in the United States treats gays and lesbians like human beings."

For thousands of years, he said, one of the key markers for first-class citizenship in any nation is the right to serve in the military, and Saturday's vote "is a historic step toward that."

Associated Press writers Russ Bynum in Savannah, Ga., Jay Lindsay in Boston, Geoff Mulvihill in Trenton, N.J., and Sudhin Thanawala in San Francisco contributed to this report. 

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