10-28-2020  9:52 pm   •   PDX and SEA Weather
Vote like your life depends on it
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NORTHWEST NEWS

Paris Train Attack Hero Makes Bid for Congress From Oregon

Over 60% of Alek Skarlatos' campaign funding comes from out of state, Democratic incumbent Peter DeFazio said during their debate. Some came from Sen. Ted Cruz, R-Texas.

President of Portland NAACP Resigns Ahead of November Election

Rev. Mondainé denies allegations of abuse

Candidate Iannarone Welcomes Ruling on Complaint Against Mayor Wheeler

Mayoral challenger Sarah Iannarone has welcomed the Multnomah County Circuit court ruling requiring City Auditor Mary Hull Caballero to look into a complaint against Portland Mayor Ted Wheeler for loaning his own re-election campaign 0,000

Some Hospitals in Crisis as US nears high for COVID-19 cases

The global surge in coronavirus infections is hitting the United States hard and overwhelming hospitals across the nation

NEWS BRIEFS

Confederate Flag Not Welcome in Oregon Historic Cemeteries

Oregon’s Commission on Historic Cemeteries recommends Confederate flags not be allowed in historic cemeteries, but cemeteries that...

The Last Day to Safely Mail Your Ballot is Tuesday, October 27

Ballot envelopes must be signed and ballots received by the elections office by Election Day, Tuesday, November 3 at 8:00 PM. Postmark...

iPhone Users: Beware of the 'Apple Support' Scam

Oregonians to hang up on unsolicited phone calls that sound like they are from Apple. ...

Henry Louis Gates, Jr. to Give Virtual Lecture Nov. 9 at Oregon State University

Gates is a Harvard University professor and host of a groundbreaking, Emmy Award-winning PBS genealogy series “The African...

New Crisis Line will Serve BIPOC Community

Lines for Life have launched a new crisis line dedicated to and staffed by Black, Indigenous and People of Color ...

More than half of Oregon voters have cast ballots

SALEM, Ore. (AP) — With less than a week to go until Election Day, more than half of the registered voters in Oregon have already cast their ballots. At this point during the last three presidential elections, fewer than 38% of Oregonians had returned their ballots. As of Wednesday, more...

Young gray wolf from California spotted in Oregon

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — A young member of California’s only known gray wolf pack has left the state and ventured into Oregon, wildlife officials said.The male wolf, dubbed LAS13M, traveled to Lake County, Oregon, in early October and has remained there, according to a...

Missouri wide receiver arrested, dismissed from team

COLUMBIA, Mo. (AP) — Missouri wide receiver Maurice Massey has been dismissed from the team after being arrested, school officials said Monday.Massey, 20, was arrested Sunday on suspicion of third-degree domestic assault, fourth-degree assault and first-degree property damage, according to...

Missouri grinds out 1st victory over Kentucky in five years

COLUMBIA, Mo. (AP) — Missouri kept handing the ball to Larry Rountree, and Kentucky barely got a chance to take a turn. Rountree carried 37 times for 126 yards and two touchdowns as the Tigers dominated the clock and the Wildcats in a 20-10 victory on Saturday.Missouri (2-2 Southeastern...

OPINION

Open Letter to the Community on the Multnomah County Circuit Court Judicial Election

History has shown us that judges impact systemic change and have the opportunity to include the voices of our communities in the process. ...

Squaring Away the Cube

When I first heard that entertainer Ice Cube is supporting Donald Trump in his 2020 re-election bid, I did not believe it. ...

The Skanner News National 2020 Election Endorsements

Vote like your life depends on it. Read The Skanner News' endorsements for US President, and more ...

The Skanner News Statewide Election 2020 Endorsements

Read The Skanner News' endorsements for Portland Mayor, Portland City Council, and more ...

AFRICAN AMERICANS IN THE NEWS

Letters, texts, caravans, parades: Advocates mobilize voters

Sometimes her hand hurt, but Nancy Gehman kept writing. Every evening from July until mid-October, the 85-year-old retiree sat with a gel pen, writing notes imploring fellow Americans to find a way to vote.Then she mailed them: All 1,260 letters.“It was comforting to know that I was doing...

Road trip: In Mississippi, love in the time of coronavirus

JACKSON, Miss. (AP) — Her voice cracked as she spoke from her hospital bed. “I want to go home,” she pleaded. More than 40 miles away, her husband sat in their living room, looking intently into his phone as they spoke on a video call, trying to soothe her. Bonnie Bishop had...

Pandemic politics: Biden shuns 'false promises' of fast fix

BULLHEAD CITY, Ariz. (AP) — Focused firmly on COVID-19, Joe Biden vowed Wednesday not to campaign in the election homestretch “on the false promises of being able to end this pandemic by flipping a switch.” President Donald Trump, under attack for his handling of the worst...

ENTERTAINMENT

Ahead of the election, a landslide of documentaries

NEW YORK (AP) — The election has unleashed an avalanche of documentaries like no season before it. Dozens of films, exploring issues from gerrymandering to white supremacists, have sought to illuminate the many issues and trends voters are confronting at the polls on Tuesday. In a...

'Masked Singer' begets 'Masked Dancer,' set for December

LOS ANGELES (AP) — Fox's hit series “The Masked Singer” is getting company with “The Masked Dancer,” a chance for celebrity contestants to show off their moves in disguise.Actor and comedian Craig Robinson ("The Office," “Hot Tub Time Machine”) will...

Country artist Cam confronts hard truths on 'The Otherside'

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — The five-year journey between albums for country singer Cam was an evolution in coming to grips with hard truths about a music industry that had left her a bit bruised but not broken.The California-born singer with cinematic influences made an instant impression in...

U.S. & WORLD NEWS

MLB says Turner violated protocols when he returned to field

ARLINGTON, Texas (AP) — Justin Turner violated coronavirus protocols when he celebrated with his Los...

Asian shares lower, US futures up after S&P 500 sinks 3.5%

Asian shares declined Thursday and U.S. futures turned higher after the S&P 500 slid 3.5% overnight for its...

Road trip: In Mississippi, love in the time of coronavirus

JACKSON, Miss. (AP) — Her voice cracked as she spoke from her hospital bed. “I want to go...

Poles join strike as protests against abortion ruling expand

WARSAW, Poland (AP) — People across Poland stayed off their jobs and huge crowds poured onto the streets...

S. Korea's top court upholds 17-year jail term on ex-leader

SEOUL, South Korea (AP) — South Korea’s top court upheld a 17-year sentence imposed on former...

Tanzania votes but 'widespread irregularities' are claimed

DODOMA, Tanzania (AP) — Tanzania's presidential election saw “widespread irregularities," the...

Vote like your life depends on it
By The Skanner News

WASHINGTON (AP) — Republicans rolled up historic gains to seize control of the House on Tuesday, as voters disenchanted with the economy, President Barack Obama and government dealt a strong rebuke to Democrats in every corner of the country.



The GOP ousted Democratic freshmen and influential veterans, including some considered safe just weeks ago. Republicans piled up their biggest House gains since they added 80 seats in 1938: By early Wednesday, they had netted 60 formerly Democratic seats and led in four more. The GOP victory eclipsed the 54-seat pickup by the so-called "revolution" that retook the House in 1994 for the first time in 40 years and the 56-seat Republican gain in 1946.



Ascendant Republican leaders quickly pledged to heed the message of angry voters who they acknowledged were rejecting what both parties had to offer.



"Across the country right now, we are witnessing a repudiation of Washington, a repudiation of big government, and a repudiation of politicians who refuse to listen to the people," said Rep. John Boehner of Ohio, in line to become the next speaker.



With the realities of divided government sinking in, Obama called Boehner to say he looked forward to working with him and the GOP "to find common ground, move the country forward and get things done for the American people," the White House said.



Boehner told the president he wanted to collaborate on voters' top priorities, creating jobs and cutting spending. "That's what they expect," the 10-term Republican said.



Licking their wounds, House Democrats defended their legislative record and campaign strategy and said they would try to compromise with the GOP.



"The outcome of the election does not diminish the work we have done for the American people," said House Speaker Nancy Pelosi of California, the first woman to hold the post. "We must all strive to find common ground to support the middle class, create jobs, reduce the deficit and move our nation forward."



By midmorning Wednesday, the GOP had captured 239 seats and was leading for four more, while Democrats had won 184 and led for eight.



Democrats now control the House by a 255-178 margin, with two vacancies. All 435 seats were on the ballot.



Democrats had only picked up three Republican seats, and had lost some of their most powerful members, including Rep. John Spratt in South Carolina, the 14-termer who heads the Budget Committee, Rep. Ike Skelton in Missouri, the Armed Services Committee chairman, and House Transportation Committee chairman Rep. James Oberstar of Minnesota, an 18-term veteran.



Republicans defeated three dozen Democrats in districts won by Sen. John McCain of Arizona in the 2008 presidential campaign, as voters in exit polls expressed anxiety about the economy, disillusion with Obama and tea party-fueled distaste for government. GOP gains were particularly pronounced in the Rust Belt, with the party racking up two wins in Indiana, five each in Ohio and Pennsylvania, three in Illinois, and two in Michigan. They scored key victories from Maryland to Washington and broke House Democrats' monopolies in New England and in New York City — by defeating Rep. Carol Shea Porter in New Hampshire and Rep. Mike McMahon on Staten Island.



Among the victims were Ohio Rep. Steve Driehaus, Reps. Suzanne Kosmas of Florida, Frank Kratovil of Maryland and Tom Perriello of Virginia, first-termers who backed key elements of Obama's agenda — the president even campaigned for Perriello — and were savaged for it by their Republican rivals.



But those who stressed their independence from their party, like Reps. Glenn Nye of Virginia, Travis Childers of Mississippi and Bobby Bright of Alabama, also went down. Some old bulls also fell, including nine-term Rep. Earl Pomeroy in North Dakota, 13-term Rep. Paul Kanjorski in Pennsylvania and 20-year veteran Rep. Chet Edwards in Texas.



And Democrats thought to be cruising toward re-election were surprised to be caught up in an anti-incumbent tide. Seven-term Rep. Bob Etheridge in North Carolina lost to Sarah Palin-backed candidate Renee Ellmers, a nurse who got into the race in part because of the health care law. And conservative Democratic Rep. Gene Taylor in Mississippi was defeated by a late surge for Republican state Rep. Steven Palazzo, even after trying everything to distance himself from his party — including publicly confessing that he voted for McCain in the 2008 presidential election.



Democrats had few gains to celebrate. In one rare bright spot, John Carney handily beat Republican Glen Urquhart in the race to succeed GOP Rep. Mike Castle in Delaware's only House seat, which Castle left to unsuccessfully pursue a Senate seat. In New Orleans, Democrat Cedric Richmond beat Rep. Anh "Joseph" Cao, who had campaigned as a friend of Obama. And in Hawaii, state Senate president Colleen Hanabusa, for whom Obama appeared in TV ads, unseated Republican Rep. Charles Djou, running for a first full term after winning a May special election in Obama's birth-state.



A handful of Democrats heavily targeted by the GOP pulled through, including Reps. Betty Sutton of Ohio, Joe Donnelly of Indiana, Heath Shuler of North Carolina and John Yarmuth of Kentucky.



Voters went to the polls intensely worried about the economy and dissatisfied with the way the federal government is working. An Associated Press analysis of exit poll results found voters saying the economy eclipses any other issue as their top concern. They're also expressing dissatisfaction with Obama and Congress, and they don't have a favorable view of either political party.



It was a remarkable turnabout from 2008, when Obama helped propel Democrats to big gains in their House majority only two years after the 2006 wave that swept them to control. This year, few Democratic incumbents were safe, least of all the 51 who claimed Republican seats over the last four years.



House candidates and party committees raised and spent tons of campaign cash, and Democrats had a slight edge. The Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee spent $145 million to bankroll its candidates, compared with $121 million shelled out by the National Republican Congressional Committee. That's nearly double what the Democratic campaign arm spent in the last election, and more than five times what the Republican counterpart did when the tables were turned.



GOP candidates poured a total of $419 million into their campaigns, while Democrats spent $421.5 million.



But Republican-allied outside groups skewed the playing field dramatically. They spent $189.5 million savaging Democratic candidates while independent groups skewering Republicans spent $89 million.

Mingus Mapps 2020
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