10-27-2020  10:37 am   •   PDX and SEA Weather
Vote like your life depends on it
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4

NORTHWEST NEWS

Paris Train Attack Hero Makes Bid for Congress From Oregon

Over 60% of Alek Skarlatos' campaign funding comes from out of state, Democratic incumbent Peter DeFazio said during their debate. Some came from Sen. Ted Cruz, R-Texas.

President of Portland NAACP Resigns Ahead of November Election

Rev. Mondainé denies allegations of abuse

Candidate Iannarone Welcomes Ruling on Complaint Against Mayor Wheeler

Mayoral challenger Sarah Iannarone has welcomed the Multnomah County Circuit court ruling requiring City Auditor Mary Hull Caballero to look into a complaint against Portland Mayor Ted Wheeler for loaning his own re-election campaign 0,000

Some Hospitals in Crisis as US nears high for COVID-19 cases

The global surge in coronavirus infections is hitting the United States hard and overwhelming hospitals across the nation

NEWS BRIEFS

The Last Day to Safely Mail Your Ballot is Today, Tuesday, October 27

Ballot envelopes must be signed and ballots received by the elections office by Election Day, Tuesday, November 3 at 8:00 PM. Postmark...

iPhone Users: Beware of the 'Apple Support' Scam

Oregonians to hang up on unsolicited phone calls that sound like they are from Apple. ...

Henry Louis Gates, Jr. to Give Virtual Lecture Nov. 9 at Oregon State University

Gates is a Harvard University professor and host of a groundbreaking, Emmy Award-winning PBS genealogy series “The African...

New Crisis Line will Serve BIPOC Community

Lines for Life have launched a new crisis line dedicated to and staffed by Black, Indigenous and People of Color ...

Oregon Reports the Highest Daily Case Count Since the Beginning of the Pandemic

OHA reports 550 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 3 new deaths ...

Confederate flag not welcome in Oregon historic cemeteries

OREGON CITY, Ore. (AP) — A state commission has voted to recommend that the Confederate flag no longer be allowed in Oregon’s historic cemeteries. Members of Oregon’s Commission on Historic Cemeteries voted unanimously Friday to adopt a position paper recommending Confederate...

Man pleads no contest to child sex abuse in plea deal

ALBANY, Ore. (AP) — An 18-year-old Sweet Home man has pleaded no contest to two counts of first-degree sex abuse in Linn County Circuit Court.Seven Lee Bullock entered the pleas last week and is scheduled to be sentenced on Nov. 6, the Albany Democrat-Herald reported.The crimes occurred...

Missouri wide receiver arrested, dismissed from team

COLUMBIA, Mo. (AP) — Missouri wide receiver Maurice Massey has been dismissed from the team after being arrested, school officials said Monday.Massey, 20, was arrested Sunday on suspicion of third-degree domestic assault, fourth-degree assault and first-degree property damage, according to...

Missouri grinds out 1st victory over Kentucky in five years

COLUMBIA, Mo. (AP) — Missouri kept handing the ball to Larry Rountree, and Kentucky barely got a chance to take a turn. Rountree carried 37 times for 126 yards and two touchdowns as the Tigers dominated the clock and the Wildcats in a 20-10 victory on Saturday.Missouri (2-2 Southeastern...

OPINION

Squaring Away the Cube

When I first heard that entertainer Ice Cube is supporting Donald Trump in his 2020 re-election bid, I did not believe it. ...

The Skanner News National 2020 Election Endorsements

Vote like your life depends on it. Read The Skanner News' endorsements for US President, and more ...

The Skanner News Statewide Election 2020 Endorsements

Read The Skanner News' endorsements for Portland Mayor, Portland City Council, and more ...

Muslim Advocates Denounces Trump’s Racist Attacks on Rep. Ilhan Omar and Refugees

The organization says Trump’s attacks invite violence against Rep. Omar and Minnesota’s Somali community ...

AFRICAN AMERICANS IN THE NEWS

Review: 'Memorial' like a dance gliding between characters

“Memorial,” by Bryan Washington (Riverhead Books)“Memorial,” by Bryan Washington, follows the complex relationship between Benson, a Black day care teacher, and Mike, a Japanese American chef. The couple live together in Texas, and for all intents and purposes, they are...

Fraught election puts faith leaders through a political test

Both President Donald Trump and Democratic nominee Joe Biden count endorsements from well-known faith leaders. But for clergy members who try to tackle thorny moral matters without overtly backing a candidate, the campaign has tested their ability to reconcile religious values and politics.That...

Entertainers discuss disability representation in Hollywood

It’s an old cliche that if an actor wants to win an Oscar, he or she should consider playing a character with a disability. And it’s not entirely unfounded advice: 61 actors have been nominated for playing a character with a disability and 27 have walked away winners. But only two of...

ENTERTAINMENT

'Magic Tree House' books to be adapted into graphic novels

NEW YORK (AP) — Mary Pope Osborne is preparing her million-selling “Magic Tree House” series for a new adventure.She is teaming with playwright Jenny Laird and the illustrators-sisters Kelly Matthews and Nichole Matthews to adapt her work for graphic novels. The first release...

`The books that help her through': Winfrey suggests seven

NEW YORK (AP) — With Election Day approaching and the pandemic ongoing, Oprah Winfrey is setting aside her usual book club recommendations and instead citing seven personal favorites, ranging from James Baldwin's landmark essays in “The Fire Next Time” to Mary Oliver's poetry...

Hugh Laurie goes for bumpy political ride in PBS' 'Roadkill'

LOS ANGELES (AP) — On screen, Hugh Laurie has been by turns irascible ("House"), villainous ("The Night Manager") and a comedic delight ("Jeeves & Wooster"). In a conversation about his latest project, PBS' “Roadkill,” he proved equally versatile.Laurie was thoughtful and...

U.S. & WORLD NEWS

One Good Thing: Wickedly creative pandemic trick-or-treating

CINCINNATI (AP) — Dropping candy down a chute for little costumed Baby Sharks, Mulans and Black Panthers....

Hurricane warning for New Orleans as Zeta swirls over Mexico

NEW ORLEANS (AP) — Residents of the storm-pummeled Gulf Coast steeled themselves for yet another tropical...

'We're working on it:' Pope's COVID advisers and the mask

ROME (AP) — Pope Francis’ decision to forgo wearing a mask has been noticed, with some concern, by...

Stop the music! Chorus of artists tell Trump to turn it down

LOS ANGELES (AP) — From the beloved opening lines of Leonard Cohen's “Hallelujah” to the...

'We're working on it:' Pope's COVID advisers and the mask

ROME (AP) — Pope Francis’ decision to forgo wearing a mask has been noticed, with some concern, by...

Turkey's Erdogan sues Dutch anti-Islam lawmaker for insults

ANKARA, Turkey (AP) — Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan is suing Dutch lawmaker Geert Wilders after...

Vote like your life depends on it
Jenny Barchfield the Associated Press

Paris — Masked youths clashed with police and set fires in cities across France today as protests against a proposed hike in the retirement age took an increasingly radical turn. Hundreds of flights were canceled, long lines formed at gas stations and train service in many regions was cut in half.

President Nicolas Sarkozy pledged to crack down on "troublemakers" and guarantee public order, raising the possibility of more confrontations with young rioters after a week of disruptive but largely nonviolent demonstrations.

The Skanner News Video here

Sarkozy also vowed to ensure that fuel was available to everyone. More than 1,000 gas stations are currently shuttered nationwide.

The protesters are trying to prevent the French parliament from approving a bill that would raise the retirement age from 60 to 62 to help prevent the pension system from going bankrupt. Many workers feel the change would be a first step in eroding France's social benefits — which include long vacations, contracts that make it hard for employers to lay off workers and a state-subsidized health care system — in favor of "American-style capitalism."

Sarkozy's conservative government points out that 62 is among the lowest retirement ages in the world, the French are living much longer and the pension system is losing money. The workers say the government could find pension savings elsewhere, such as by raising contributions from employers.

The Paris airport authority warned on its website and in signs at the airports: "Strike on Oct. 19. Serious difficulties expected in access to airports and air traffic." France's DGAC civil aviation authority said up to half of flights today out of Paris' Orly airport would be scrapped, and 30 percent of flights out of other French airports, including the country's largest, Charles de Gaulle, serving Paris, would be canceled.

Most cancellations were on short- and medium-haul domestic and inter-European flights. The walkout by air traffic controllers was expected to last one day, with flights expected to return to normal on Wednesday.

In Metro Detroit, Metro Airport is reporting no problems so far with its one flight daily to France. Airport spokesman Mike Conway said the Delta/Air France flight was on schedule Monday and is set to fly again this evening. Delta, however, has warned customers the strike could affect flights. Conway said the airline is making sure its planes have enough fuel to land at alternate sites if required.

At the airport in the Atlantic city of Bordeaux, scores of protesters blocked the entrance for several hours this morning In Paris, huge crowds started marching from the Place d'Italie in the south toward the gilded-domed Invalides, where Napoleon is buried. The protest appeared peaceful, but law-enforcement officials were bracing for possible confrontations with youth. Police estimated the crowd at 60,000, down from 65,000 at a similar march last week.

At a high school in the Paris suburb of Nanterre, closed because of earlier violence, a few hundred youths started throwing stones from a bridge at nearly as many police, who responded with tear gas and barricaded the area. It was not immediately clear if there were injuries or arrests. Youths also knocked an Associated Press photographer off his motorbike and kicked and punched him as they rampaged down a street adjacent to the school. Another AP photographer was hit in the face by an empty glass bottle in Lyon, where protests turned violent and rioters smashed several store windows.

The violence recalled student protests in 2006 that forced the government to abandon a law making it easier for employers to hire and fire young people. Those protests started peacefully but degenerated into violence, with troublemakers smashing store windows and setting cars and garbage cans ablaze.

The specter of 2005 riots that spread through poor housing projects nationwide with large, disenfranchised immigrant populations was also present.

At the Place de la Republique in eastern Paris today, young people pelted riot police with projectiles, while youth in the central city of Lyon torched garbage cans and cars as police riposted with clouds of tear gas.

It was the sixth national day of demonstrations over the planned pension reform since early September. Union leaders have vowed to keep up pressure until the government scraps the unpopular plan and opens negotiations.

Sarkozy called the reform his "duty" as head of state and said it must go through to save France's generous but money-losing pension system. The protests in France come as countries across Europe are cutting spending and raising taxes to bring down record deficits and debts from the worst recession in 70 years.

Strikes by oil refinery workers have sparked fuel shortages that forced at least 1,000 gas stations to be shuttered. Other stations saw large crowds. At an Esso station on the southeast edge of Paris this morning, the line snaked along a city block and some drivers stood with canisters to stock gasoline in case of shortages.

Sarkozy said such shortages "cannot exist in a democracy."

"There are people who want to work, the immense majority, and they cannot be deprived of gasoline," he insisted.

Police in the northwestern town of Grand-Quevilly intervened early this morning to dislodge protesters blocking a fuel depot, which had been completely sealed off since Monday morning, local officials there said. No one was hurt in the operation, the officials said.

Truckers have joined the protest, running so-called "escargot" operations in which they drive at a snail's pace on highways. Today, about 20 truckers blocked an oil depot in Nanterre west of Paris operated by oil giant Total, turning away fellow truckers coming to fill up with gasoline. Police stood by but did not intervene.

Students entered the fray last week, blockading high schools around the country and staging protests that have occasionally degenerated into clashes with police.

Across the country, 379 high schools were blocked or disrupted today to varying degrees, the Education Ministry said. It was the highest figure so far in the student movement against the retirement reform. Student movements have forced previous governments to back off planned reforms in the past, and student leaders hope these protests will prove as successful.

The head of the UNEF student union, Jean-Baptiste Prevost, said the students "have no other solution but to continue."

"Every time the government is firm, there are more people in the street," he told i-tele news channel, predicting a large turnout for today's street marches.

With disruptions on the national railway entering their eighth consecutive day today, many commuters' patience was beginning to wear thin. Only about one in two trains were running on some of the Paris Metro lines, and commuters had to elbow their way onto packed trains.

In a statement posted on its website, the SNCF railway operator said only about half the regularly scheduled high-speed TGV trains linking Paris to regional French cities was operating today, while fast trains between regions was slashed by 75 percent. The Eurostar, which links Paris to London via the British Channel tunnel, is unaffected, the statement said.

In the Mediterranean port city of Marseille, strikes by garbage collectors have left heaps of trash piled along city sidewalks. But still, the piles of rotting garbage don't appear to have diminished labor union support in a city that has long had an activist reputation.

"Transport, the rubbish, the nurses, the teachers, the workers, the white collar, everyone who works, we should all be united. If there is no transport today, we're not all going to die from it," said 55-year-old resident Francoise Michelle.

Sarkozy has stressed that 62 is among the lowest retirement ages in Europe, the French are living much longer and the pension system is losing money.

The measure is expected to pass a vote in the Senate this week. Slated to take place on Wednesday, it's been pushed back until later in the week so lawmakers have the time to examine hundreds of amendments brought by opposition Socialists and others.

Student leaders have called for a demonstration in front of the Senate on Wednesday and another round of strikes at high schools and universities on Thursday.

Mingus Mapps 2020
Mult Co Safe Strong
Calendar

Photo Gallery

Photos and slide shows of local events

LWV Voter info 2020

Kevin Saddler