10-19-2021  1:53 am   •   PDX and SEA Weather
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NORTHWEST NEWS

Oregon Set to Expand Hotline for Bias Crime Reporting

With a rise in hate crimes and bias incidents in Oregon and nationwide the two-person office just couldn’t handle the volume.

Portland Shootings Prompt DA to Spend $1M to Handle Cases

Multnomah County plans to hire four prosecutors and two investigators to help with an increasing caseload of homicide investigations

Cascadia Whole Health Honors Community Justice Leader, Fine Artist with Culture of Caring Awards

Erika Preuitt and Jeremy Okai Davis recognized for positive contributions to community.

Salem-Keizer School Boards Adopts Anti-Racism Resolution

The Salem-Keizer school board has voted to adopt a resolution outlining the board’s commitment to equity and anti-racism.

NEWS BRIEFS

Sen. Kayse Jama Announces Re-Election Campaign for Senate District 24

Since his appointment, Jama has worked to address the systemic inequality that Oregonians have faced ...

Dion Matthews Jr. Homicide Remains Unsolved After Six Years

The 2015 homicide is a Crime Stoppers featured case ...

Joint Center Commends Senator Whitehouse for Hiring Monalisa Dugué as Chief of Staff

Dugué is one of two Black Chiefs of Staff in the Senate ...

FBI Offers up to $25,000 for Information in Mass Shooting Event

18-year-old Makayla Maree Harris killed and six others injured in a Portland shooting on July 17, 2021 ...

Nearly 100 Animals Seized From Woofin Palooza Forfeited to MCAS

A Multnomah County Circuit Court judge has ruled that dogs and cats seized from an unlicensed facility named Woofin Palooza are now...

'A dangerous time': Portland, Oregon, sees record homicides

PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) — It was nearly last call on a Friday when Jacob Eli Knight Vasquez went to get a drink across the street from the tavern where he worked in northwest Portland — an area with a thriving dining scene, where citygoers enjoy laid-back eateries, international cuisines and cozy...

Federal judge rejects bid to block Oregon vaccine mandate

PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) — A federal judge on Monday denied a last-minute bid by more than three dozen state employees, health care providers and school staff to temporarily stop the state’s COVID-19 vaccination mandate. U.S. District Judge Michael H. Simon rejected their motion...

No. 21 Texas A&M runs over Missouri, 35-14

COLUMBIA, Mo. (AP) — Texas A&M coach Jimbo Fisher warned his team all week that it couldn’t afford a letdown after its upset of top-ranked Alabama. His message got through, as the 21st-ranked Aggies buried Missouri early in a 35-14 victory Saturday. “We preached it,...

No. 21 Texas A&M heads to Mizzou after 'Bama upset win

No. 21 Texas A&M (4-2, 1-2 SEC) at Missouri (3-3, 0-2), Saturday at noon EDT (SEC Network). Line: Texas A&M by 9 1/2, according to FanDuel Sportsbook. Series record: Texas A&M leads 8-7. WHAT’S AT STAKE? ...

OPINION

How Food Became the Perfect Beachhead for Gentrification

What could be the downside of fresh veggies, homemade empanadas and a pop-up restaurant specializing in banh mis? ...

Homelessness, Houselessness in the Richest Country in the World: An Uncommon Logic

When and why did the United States of America chose the wealth of a few over the health, wealth, and well-being of so many ...

American Business Leaders Step Up to Fight Inequities in the South

With COVID-19 still an omnipresent concern and the country’s recovery still very much in jeopardy, individuals, families, and communities are struggling to deal with issues that have only been exacerbated by the pandemic. ...

Waters Statement on 20th Anniversary of September 11 Attacks

Twenty years ago today, our nation suffered devastating terrorist attacks on our soil and against our people that wholly and completely changed the world as we knew it. ...

AFRICAN AMERICANS IN THE NEWS

Lapchick family felt backlash due to Knicks coach's views

(EDITOR'S NOTE: Richard E. Lapchick shares some of the backlash his family felt that was directed at his father, former Knicks coach Joe Lapchick, for signing the first Black player to an NBA contract in 1950. The experience led him to his work today; Richard directs the Institute for Diversity and...

Texas lawmakers pass new congressional maps bolstering GOP

AUSTIN, Texas (AP) — Texas Republicans approved redrawn U.S. House maps that favor incumbents and decrease political representation for growing minority communities, even as Latinos drive much of the growth in the nation’s largest red state. The maps were approved late...

Texas lawmakers pass new congressional maps bolstering GOP

AUSTIN, Texas (AP) — Texas Republicans approved on Monday redrawn U.S. House maps that favor incumbents and decrease political representation for growing minority communities, even as Latinos drive much of the growth in the nation’s largest red state. The maps were approved...

ENTERTAINMENT

Betty Lynn, Thelma Lou on 'The Andy Griffith Show,' has died

MOUNT AIRY, N.C. (AP) — Betty Lynn, the film and television actor who was best known for her role as Barney Fife's sweetheart Thelma Lou on “The Andy Griffith Show,” has died. She was 95. Lynn died peacefully Saturday after a brief illness, The Andy Griffith Museum in...

Kourtney Kardashian, Blink-182 drummer Travis Barker engaged

LOS ANGELES (AP) — A day at the beach turned into a proposal for Kourtney Kardashian, who is now engaged to Blink-182 drummer Travis Barker. Kardashian posted two photos on Instagram of the proposal with the caption “forever.” A representative for the reality star and...

Review: Elizabeth Strout writes a 'Lucy Barton' sequel

“Oh William!” by Elizabeth Strout (Random House) Elizabeth Strout has written another voice-driven novel, the third in a series of books about the fictional writer Lucy Barton and the people she grew up with in a small town in rural Illinois. “Oh...

U.S. & WORLD NEWS

EXPLAINER: Why some fear a 'Polexit' from European Union

WARSAW, Poland (AP) — Poland will be a focus of European attention this week, with Prime Minister Mateusz...

District attorneys refuse to prosecute some GOP-led laws

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — When Republican lawmakers in Tennessee blocked a policy to ease up on low-level...

Alex Murdaugh asks to leave jail after 5 days behind bars

COLUMBIA, S.C. (AP) — Lawyers for prominent South Carolina attorney Alex Murdaugh plan to ask a judge on Tuesday...

Man dies after falling from hot air balloon ride in Israel

TEL AVIV, Israel (AP) — A man is dead after falling Tuesday from a hot air balloon mid-flight, Israeli police...

Strong earthquake strikes off Turkish Mediterranean coast

ANKARA, Turkey (AP) — A strong earthquake struck off the Turkish Mediterranean coast on Tuesday, Turkey’s...

Protest strike shuts down Haiti amid search for missionaries

PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti (AP) — A protest strike shuttered businesses, schools and public transportation in a new...

By The Skanner News | The Skanner News

CHARLOTTE, N.C. (AP) -- The second-largest bottler of Coca-Cola products in the nation will pay $495,000 to settle a federal case involving charges of racially discriminatory hiring practices.
The Coca-Cola Bottling Company Consolidated, a Charlotte-based firm that is separate from the Atlanta-based Coca-Cola Company, will pay the money in back wages plus interest to 95 black and Hispanic jobseekers who applied for sales positions in 2002, according to the U.S. Department of Labor.
In addition, the bottler has agreed to offer jobs to those applicants until at least 23 are hired.
The labor department's Office of Federal Contract Compliance Programs said an investigation determined that qualified nonwhite applicants were not being hired at the same rate as qualified white applicants. In some cases, the black and Latino applicants had more experience and education than some of the whites who did get jobs, according to the agency.
The office launched the investigation because the bottler is a federal contractor, supplying Coke-brand products to a number of military and government agencies.
``Being a federal contractor is a privilege that comes with an obligation to ensure equal opportunity in employment,'' said Patricia Shiu, director of the contract compliance office, in a statement.
The bottler agreed to the settlement, but admits no wrongdoing in the case, according to a statement provided by Alison Patient, director of corporate affairs at the company.
``Coca-Cola Bottling Co. Consolidated did not and does not discriminate against any person for any reason,'' the statement said. ``There were legitimate non-discriminatory reasons for not hiring certain applicants who are the subject of this claim.''

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