07-29-2021  11:35 am   •   PDX and SEA Weather
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NORTHWEST NEWS

Unemployed Oregonians to Lose Pandemic Benefits in September

The state will stop paying the 0 weekly unemployment bonus after Labor Day

Statue of Black hero on Lewis & Clark trip toppled in Oregon

A statue in Portland, Oregon, commemorating York, an enslaved Black member of the Lewis and Clark expedition, has been toppled and damaged

Cannabis Chemical Delta-8 Gains Fans, Scrutiny

A chemical cousin of pot’s main intoxicating ingredient has rocketed to popularity over the last year. The cannabis industry and state governments are scrambling to reckon with it amid debate over whether it’s legal.

Report: SPD Stops Black People, Native Americans More

A newly-released report shows Seattle police officers continue to stop and use force against Black people far more often than white people.

NEWS BRIEFS

Portland Bars Camping in Forested Areas During Fire Season

The move aims to protect protect individuals experiencing homelessness and people in nearby homes from potentially deadly wildfires ...

OSF Presents Free Virtual Reading of Emilia

The event streams live on Wednesday, July 28 at 5:30 p.m. ...

Summer Bike Events to be Held at El Centro Milagro

This summer the streets around Milagro will host a cycle of fun activities. ...

SPLC Urges Department of Education to Prevent Racial Disparities and Discrimination in School Discipline

Research shows that Black students receive more severe disciplinary outcomes for the same behaviors as white students ...

Contractor Selected for Two-Year Morrison Bridge Painting Project

This will be the first time the Morrison Bridge river spans have been painted since the bridge opened 63 years ago in 1958. ...

Judge allows Nevada tribes to join fight over lithium mine

RENO, Nev. (AP) — A judge has cleared the way for two tribes to join an ongoing legal battle over plans to build a Nevada mine at the largest known U.S. deposit of lithium and seek a temporary ban on digging for an archaeological survey they say would desecrate sacred tribal lands near the Oregon...

COVID-19 surge straining Eastern Oregon hospitals

PENDLETON, Ore. (AP) — More than half the patients hospitalized as of Tuesday at CHI St. Anthony Hospital in Pendleton, Oregon, have tested positive for COVID-19, officials said. The hospitalizations come as Umatilla County reports about 8% of the state’s total cases over...

Drinkwitz, Pittman back for Southeastern Conference encores

HOOVER, Ala. (AP) — Missouri and Arkansas both had some encouraging signs, if not great records, in their first seasons under new coaches. Now, the Tigers’ Eliah Drinkwitz and Razorbacks’ Sam Pittman are among four second-year Southeastern Conference coaches trying to...

OPINION

Services Available for Victims and Survivors of Community Violence in Multnomah County

The number of incidents of community violence — domestic violence, sexual violence, trafficking, person-to-person violence and gun violence — is devastating ...

Black America Needs a ‘New Normal’: Equitable Credit Access to Build Wealth

The rippling effects of a massive economic downturn has caused the nation to lose 9.5 million jobs - more losses than even those of the Great Recession ...

The President Needs to Pull Out All Stops

Majority Whip Clyburn, Democratic leader in the U.S. House of Representatives, made the observation that the filibuster currently being used in the U.S. Senate to block the Voting Rights Bill as well as the George Floyd Bill, is a matter of tradition and not...

NAACP Vancouver Letter to the Community: Police Accountability

NAACP Vancouver reacts to the descision in the case of Jonah Donald, a Black man shot and killed by a Clark County deputy ...

AFRICAN AMERICANS IN THE NEWS

New Yorkers say they've been ignored in stop-and-frisk fight

NEW YORK (AP) — Eight years after a judge ruled New York City police violated the constitution by stopping, questioning and frisking mostly Black and Hispanic people on the street en masse, people in communities most affected by such tactics say they've been shut out of the legal process to end...

Ex-police chief who rescued baby pleads guilty to assault

KANSAS CITY, Mo. (AP) — A former suburban Kansas City police chief who helped rescue a baby from an icy pond and later assaulted the man accused of trying to kill the infant has pleaded guilty in the case. Greg Hallgrimson, 51, pleaded guilty in federal court Wednesday, the...

Violent arrest in Colorado reignites anger over policing

AURORA, Colo. (AP) — A video showing a police officer pistol-whipping and choking a Black man during an arrest in a Denver suburb has reignited anger over policing in the community, with activists decrying what they say is just the latest example of the mistreatment of people of color. ...

ENTERTAINMENT

Review: In 'Stillwater,' a red state hero roams chic France

Early on in “Stillwater,” a gruff oil rig worker from Oklahoma is asked what he's doing in the French port city of Marseille. “Visiting my daughter,” he replies. That's only sort of right, it turns out. He left some stuff out. But truth itself gets more than a little...

Review: In 'The Suicide Squad,' an anti-Captain America romp

One little article separates James Gunn’s “The Suicide Squad” from David Ayer’s “Suicide Squad.” But, oh, what a difference a word makes. Just five years after the trainwreck that prompted Warner Bros. to retool its DC Comics universe, James Gunn’s nearly wholesale...

Danticat, Groff among contributors to book 'Small Odysseys'

NEW YORK (AP) — Michael Cunningham, Edwidge Danticat and Carmen Maria Machado are among the prize-winning authors contributing stories to a collection co-sponsored by Manhattan's Symphony Space performing arts center and its nationally aired “Selected Shorts” program. ...

U.S. & WORLD NEWS

In Robinhood's stock debut, a tumble and then sharp swings

NEW YORK (AP) — Robinhood made its own leap into the stock market Thursday, the one it helped reshape by...

'Trying to survive': Wells dry up amid Oregon water woes

MALIN, Ore. (AP) — Judy and Jim Shanks know the exact date their home’s well went dry — June 24. ...

AP PHOTOS: Tears of victory, defeat for Tokyo Olympians

An equestrian hugging his horse. A surfer slumped over his board. A judoka raising her fists in jubilation while...

AstraZeneca to seek US approval of COVID vaccine in 2nd half

LONDON (AP) — AstraZeneca said Thursday that it intends to seek U.S. approval for its COVID-19 vaccine later...

Nightmares, panic attacks: Belgian flood survivors struggle

TROOZ, Belgium (AP) — Visions of cars being swept away in a raging current keep coming back to trouble Eric...

Inquiry into Malta journalist's slaying blames state

VALLETTA, Malta (AP) — An independent inquiry into the murder of investigative journalist Daphne Caruana Galizia...

Nicole Winfield the Associated Press

LONDON – British police arrested five London street cleaners over an alleged threat to Pope Benedict XVI on Friday, the second day of a papal trip to Britain that has brought both a warm welcome from Catholics and renewed anger over the clerical sex abuse scandal.
The Vatican said the pope was calm despite the pre-dawn arrests and planned no changes to his schedule.
Acting on a tip, police detained the men, aged 26 to 50, under the Terrorism Act at a cleaning depot in central London after receiving information about a possible threat. The men were being questioned at a London police station and have not been charged. Police said an initial search of that business and other properties did not uncover any hazardous items.
The Skanner News Video

The pope's visit has divided opinion in officially Protestant, highly secular Britain. The trip has been overshadowed by disgust over the Catholic Church's clerical abuse scandal and opposition from secularists and those opposed to the pope's stances against homosexuality and using condoms to fight AIDS.
The detained suspects worked for a contractor on behalf of Westminster Council, the authority responsible for much of central London. The pope will still address British politicians, businessmen and cultural leaders in Westminster Hall, part of the Houses of Parliament, later Friday.
The depot were the men were arrested is responsible for cleaning another part of London that the pope is not due to visit, police said.
Police confirmed that some of the suspects were thought to be from outside Britain but declined to comment on media reports they were of Algerian origin.
Veolia Environmental Services, the cleaners' company, had no immediate comment on the arrests.
At the scene of the arrests in Chiltern Street, close to London's Madame Tussauds' tourist attraction, police cordoned off part of the road, removing items from the Veolia depot and examining nearby garbage cans.
The pope's security on this trip has been visibly higher than on previous foreign trips, and Vatican officials have acknowledged that Britain represents a higher security threat than the other European countries Benedict has visited this year, including Portugal, Malta and Cyprus.
News of the arrests came as the pope was meeting representatives of other religions, including Muslims and Jews, and stressing the need for mutual respect, tolerance and freedom. The Vatican said the pope was informed of the arrests and was pleased he could stick to his schedule.
"We have complete trust in the police," Vatican spokesman Rev. Federico Lombardi told reporters. "The police are taking the necessary measures. The situation is not particularly dangerous."
"The pope is happy about this trip and is calm."
Hours after the arrests, Benedict met with the Archbishop of Canterbury Rowan Williams, the spiritual leader of the worldwide Anglican Communion, at his London residence. The meeting came amid new tensions following Benedict's unprecedented decision last year to make it easier for Anglicans opposed to the ordination of women bishops to convert to Catholicism.
Benedict and Williams greeted each other warmly. Benedict said flat-out he had no intention of speaking of difficulties "that are well known to everyone here." Rather, he stressed the need for Christians to work together and bring a greater sense of virtue into public discourse.
Williams, who has not hidden his dismay over the Vatican's invitation to conservative Angligans, also stressed the ongoing effort to bring the two churches back together, saying each side was "made less by the fact of our dividedness." He praised Benedict for his constant call to bring faith into public policy — a theme Benedict was to explore further Friday in his major address at Westminster Hall.
Benedict travels with his own security detail, headed by chief papal bodyguard Domenico Giani. Benedict's white, bulletproof Popemobile is flanked by eight to 10 dark-suited bodyguards who jog alongside, scanning crowds for potential threats.
There have been no major known attempts against Benedict during his five-year papacy, although he was knocked down at Christmas Eve Mass in 2009 by a mentally unstable woman who jumped the security barricade inside St. Peter's Basilica. In 2007, a man jumped the barricade in St. Peter's Square and grabbed the pope's vehicle before being subdued by guards.
Benedict's predecessor Pope John Paul II was wounded in an assassination attempt in 1981 in St. Peter's Square. Police in the Philippines also disrupted an alleged plot to assassinate John Paul in Manila in 1995.
Benedict was nearly 30 minutes late for his first event Friday morning; the Vatican attributed the delay at the time to logistical problems. It wasn't known if the arrests contributed to the delay.
The pope was then given a boisterous welcome by thousands of cheering Catholic schoolchildren at St. Mary's University College in London, where he urged young people to ignore the shallow temptations of today's "celebrity culture."
Benedict also told their teachers to make sure to provide the children with a trusting, safe environment — the second time in as many days that he has referred to the church sex abuse scandal.
On Thursday, the pope acknowledged that the Roman Catholic Church had failed to act quickly or decisively enough to remove pedophile priests from ministry, but U.S. activists said much more needs to be done. Vatican officials haven't confirmed that Benedict will meet with abuse victims in Britain, but U.K. organizers say arrangements are being made.
"Our responsibility toward those entrusted to us for their Christian formation demands nothing less," Benedict said. "Indeed, the life of faith can only be effectively nurtured when the prevailing atmosphere is one of respectful and affectionate trust."
Polls in Britain indicate widespread dissatisfaction with the way Benedict has handled the sex abuse scandal, with Catholics nearly as critical of him as the rest of the population.
Outside the London university hall, some 4,000 young students, outfitted in prim school uniforms and waving small white-and-yellow Holy See flags, serenaded the pontiff Friday with gospel hymns and songs.
The students, from England, Scotland and Wales, gave Benedict a tie-dyed stole and three books tracing the history of the Catholic Church in Great Britain. The 83-year-old Benedict appeared relaxed and happy, gently greeting children and kissing them on the head.
In a surprise move, Becky Gorrod, 39, who had been standing outside the gates of St. Mary's holding her 8-month-old daughter Alice, was ushered in to meet the pontiff as the crowd cheered.
"My husband's never going to believe me," Gorrod told journalists. "They opened the car door, and the pope got out. Then the (pacifier) fell out of Alice's mouth, and the pope bent down and picked it up! The pope! How mad is that?"
She said the pope then kissed Alice on the forehead.
A few blocks away, about 30 people protested, holding up inflated condoms and posters. "Condoms are not crimes," read one. Another read: "Science flies you to the moon: religion flies you into buildings."
Michael Clark, 60, said he was protesting because he was gay and annoyed that the pope's visit was expected to cost British taxpayers 12 million pounds ($18.7 million) for security.
"That means it's being supported by taxpayers and people who may not have the same ideas," Clark said. "Sexuality is not evil."
Benedict began his four-day U.K. state visit on Thursday, greeted by Queen Elizabeth II at Holyroodhouse Palace in Edinburgh, Scotland. He wraps it up Sunday in Birmingham when he beatifies the 19th century Anglican convert Cardinal John Henry Newman.
Catholics are a minority in Britain at 10 percent, and up until the early 19th century they endured harsh persecution and discrimination and were even killed for their faith. King Henry VIII broke with Rome in the 16th century after he was denied a marriage annulment.

Associated Press Writers David Stringer, Raphael G. Satter, Jill Lawless, Jennifer Quinn and Danica Kirka contributed to this report.

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