04-01-2020  9:37 am   •   PDX Weather    •   SEA weather  
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NORTHWEST NEWS

Inslee: Washington Needs More Coronavirus Test Supplies

The governor suggested the shutdown of most businesses and extreme social distancing would likely have to be extended to fight the disease

Trump Approves Major Disaster Declaration for Oregon

Gov. Brown praised the declaration, but says we still have significant requests pending, "first and foremost Oregon's request for more personal protective equipment from the national stockpile"

Vote by May 19: Oregon’s Primary Election Continues as Planned

Oregon’s vote-by-mail system keeps May Primary on schedule

A Black Woman Is Leading The Charge To Create A Vaccine For The Coronavirus

Dr. Kizzmekia Corbett and her team have begun running the first human trials of the vaccine in Seattle

NEWS BRIEFS

Oregon Medicaid Program Gains Flexibility to Better Serve Low-income Oregonians During Pandemic

Nearly one in four Oregonians currently receives health coverage through OHP. ...

Washington Elementary School Offers Food-Bearing Container Gardens During Meal Distribution

Large pots with food-bearing plants will be available for families to take home on Wednesday, April 1, from Catlin Elementary in...

Waterfront Blues Festival Cancelled for 2020

Organizers say the decision to cancel the popular festival was not taken lightly ...

NAACP Calls COVID-19 Stimulus Package a Necessary Step, but Calls Upon Congress to Do More

The NAACP says in providing future relief, Congress must prioritize people first, not corporations ...

CARES Act Must Prioritize Nation’s Most Vulnerable Communities

The Lawyers’ Committee for Civil Rights Under Law says the new bill puts the interests of corporations above the burdens faced by...

Closed computer chip factory sells for .3 million

EUGENE, Ore. (AP) — A long-shuttered computer chip factory in Eugene has sold at auction for .3 million, but it’s not clear what the new owner plans to do with the site.Hynix spent jumi.5 billion to build and equip the 1.2-million-square-foot factory, which opened in 1998. It closed...

Rural areas fear spread of virus as more hospitals close

CARROLLTON, Ala. (AP) — As the coronavirus spread across the United States, workers at the lone hospital in one Alabama county turned off beeping monitors for good and padlocked the doors, making it one of the latest in a string of nearly 200 rural hospitals to close nationwide.Now Joe...

The Latest: 2 Madison Square Garden boxing cards called off

The Latest on the coronavirus outbreak's affect on sports around the globe (all times EDT):10 p.m.Two boxing cards at Madison Square Garden have been called off because of the coronavirus outbreak.A few hours after announcing the fights would proceed without crowds, promoter Bob Arum said Thursday...

Former AD, All-American center Dick Tamburo dies at 90

EAST LANSING, Mich. (AP) — Dick Tamburo, an athletic director at three major schools and an All-American center at Michigan State, has died. He was 90.Michigan State announced that Tamburo died Monday.A native of New Kensington, Pennsylvania, Tamburo served as the athletic director at Texas...

OPINION

The ACA Has Never Been More Critical

Today I'm honoring the 10th anniversary of the Affordable Care Act being signed into law. ...

NAACP/Black Community: A Model for Resiliency

As America enters perhaps the most uncertain period in modern history, we will all be tested in new and unpredictable ways. ...

What the Government Can Do Now to Lessen the Impact of COVID-19

Dr. Roger Stark says during this pandemic the administration must give states more flexibility ...

The Homelessness Crisis – We Are Better Than This

Julianne Malveaux says this is not just about homelessness. It is about an economic crisis that has made affordable housing, jobs and economic security difficult to obtain ...

AFRICAN AMERICANS IN THE NEWS

Judge: Man linked to white supremacist group to stay in jail

SILVER SPRING, Md. (AP) — A Maryland man linked by the FBI to a white supremacist group and arrested ahead of a gun rights rally in Virginia must remain in federal custody while he awaits trial, a judge ruled Tuesday.U.S. Magistrate Judge Deborah Boardman refused to set bond for Brian Mark...

Democratic lawmakers call for racial data in virus testing

Democratic lawmakers are calling out an apparent lack of racial data that they say is needed to monitor and address disparities in the national response to the coronavirus outbreak.In a letter sent Friday to Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar, Sen. Elizabeth Warren and Rep. Ayanna...

Man, 72, dies of injuries 3 months after Hanukkah stabbings

MONSEY, N.Y. (AP) — A man who was among the five people stabbed during a Hanukkah celebration north of New York City has died three months after the attack, according to an Orthodox Jewish organization and community liaison with a local police department.Josef Neumann, 72, died Sunday night,...

ENTERTAINMENT

Review: In 'Slay the Dragon,' a gerrymandering investigation

Feeling beaten down by the news? Why not watch a documentary on gerrymandering to cheer you up?“Slay the Dragon," by Chris Durrance and Barak Goodman, deftly outlines how redistricting has eroded American democracy and helped usher compromise out of our legislatures. It's a level-headed...

CNN's Cuomo, with coronavirus, completes show from basement

NEW YORK (AP) — A bleary-eyed Chris Cuomo, saying he wanted to be a cautionary tale for his audience, anchored his CNN show from his basement Tuesday after testing positive for the coronavirus.Via remote link, he interviewed Illinois Gov. J.B. Pritzker, an emergency room nurse and CNN...

'It is brutal': Hollywood's rank-and-file on the pandemic

LOS ANGELES (AP) — The red carpets are rolled up in storage, the A-listers holed up in mansions, multiplex doors are closed. For now, at least, the coronavirus has shut down much of Hollywood. And for the entertainment industry's many one-gig-at-a-time staff and freelance workers — a...

U.S. & WORLD NEWS

VIRUS DIARY: An unfamiliar war for those who live with war

BEIRUT (AP) — I’ve seen the streets of Beirut empty before, during wars when the shells were falling...

Hezbollah shifts attention from Syria fight to battle virus

BEIRUT (AP) — In the streets of Beirut's southern suburbs, Hezbollah paramedics and volunteers on trucks...

Coast Guard: Cruise ships must stay at sea with sick onboard

FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. (AP) — The U.S. Coast Guard has directed all cruise ships to prepare to treat any...

Nursing homes have too few body bags, many uncounted dead

PARIS (AP) — One by one, elderly residents of French nursing homes are going into forced isolation into...

Too little too late? Experts decry Mexico virus policy delay

MEXICO CITY (AP) — Mexico has started taking tougher measures against the coronavirus after weeks of its...

Reporting for duty: Airline crew sign up to help hospitals

STOCKHOLM (AP) — Filip Palmgren had wanted to work on planes since he was a child. Now, after just two...

McMenamins
Hazel Trice Edney NNPA Editor-In-Chief

WASHINGTON (NNPA) - According to civil rights veteran the Rev. Jesse Jackson, Sr., an estimated 23,000 people were arrested in civil rights protests across America between Feb. 1, 1960 and Aug. 28, 1963. On that day, 47 years ago, people not only marched on Washington, but in cities and towns around the nation.
"That day a thousand marches took place around the country at the same time, marches for justice and jobs," Jackson recalled in an interview with the NNPA News Service this week.
As a result of those marches and the publicity they got, the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and the Voting Rights Act of 1965 were passed by a U. S. Congress that was hard-pressed to say no to hundreds of thousands of voters chanting in the streets. This appears to be the strategy being employed once again as at least four major marches and rallies, starting this Saturday, will hit sidewalks and parks across the nation for the purposes of calling attention to social ills and prevailing inequities mainly in America's Black and Latino communities.
"We've never lost a battle we've had mass marches for," says Jackson. "Mass marches laid the ground work for mass registration. And forces immediately respond to the cry of the masses."
Details for the four marches are as follows:
• Saturday, Aug. 28, Detroit, Mich.: "Rebuild America: Jobs, Justice, Peace" march, led by Rev. Jesse Jackson Sr.'s Rainbow/PUSH Coalition. Meet at 10:30 a.m. 151 Jefferson Avenue at the UAW-Ford National Programs Center Next to Hart Plaza. Rally will take place at 11:30 a.m. at the Grand Circus Park.
According to Rev. Jackson, the march aims to focus on the void in urban policy. "Dry roots do not produce fruit. People are disengaging in politics because their needs are not being addressed. In Detroit, Chicago, Memphis, vacant lots boarded houses rising unemployment, rising violence and closing schools are leading to low [voter] turnout. We want a focus on the need for a renewed commitment to an urban policy. It's a key to November and beyond."
• Saturday, Aug. 28, Washington, D.C. "Reclaim the Dream" March, sponsored by the National Action Network. Protestors will meet at 11 a.m. at Dunbar High School, 1301 New Jersey Ave. NW.
Sharpton told the NNPA News Service that the march is intended to expose the issues still disparately plaguing Black communities and then "lay out legislative actions we want to see enacted."
"Marching is not designed to solve the problems. Marching is designed to expose the problem. But, if you don't expose the problems, no one is going to solve it because no one's going to be forced to," Sharpton says. "We want to expose that there is double unemployment, Black to White in this country. We want to expose the education gap that is clearly in this country…Also, we want to expose the criminal justice system from police brutality to the question of high incarceration and fourthly we want to say that we want to expose the health disparities. We want to say that we've made a lot of progress in 47 years but we're still not equal and that life for Blacks in this country is still qualitatively different that life for Whites."
• Sunday, Aug. 29, New Orleans, La.: Fifth Anniversary of Hurricane Katrina, sponsored by the Black Leadership Forum and the Hip Hop Caucus. The event will start at 10 a.m. with a healing ceremony at Jourdan Road and North Galvez at the location where the levee's breached in the lower 9th Ward.
Protestors will reveal obvious racial bias in the lack of reconstruction in the predominately Black Ninth Ward; a 75 percent reduction in public housing apartments which were 98 percent African-American; and a 50 percent dropped in the 90 percent Black public schools population. For more information visit www.HipHopCaucus.org or email Darryl Perkins at [email protected]
• Saturday, Oct. 2, Washington, D.C. Mall: "One Nation, Working Together for Jobs, Justice and Education for All", sponsored by the NAACP and more than 200 social and civil rights organizations around the nation of multiple races and socio-economic statuses.
NAACP President and CEO Ben Jealous said the march is aimed to push for progress in the U.S. Senate by encouraging people to vote on Nov. 2.
"We have made tremendous progress in this country over the last two years. We have seen this progress destroyed by obstructionists in the Senate, including on job creation, justice for Black farmers, and urgently needed funding for schools," Jealous said.
"Where we've made progress, we've made progress because Blacks, Latinos, organized labor, students and small business people found a way to work together and put our shoulders to the wheel together. We saw that with health care for instance which was pronounced DOA and then revived by us coming back together and working hard together."
The march will have a three step goal, Jealous said. "Step one will get people to Washington on Oct. 2 so we are reenergized and refocused. Step two is to return to our communities to re-energize, refocus and reconnect our neighbors, get them committed to vote and turnout. Step Three is to return to Washington next spring with the agenda of the march and work with Congress to get bills passed and assure that progress is made."
The fact that America has its first Black president has not slowed the need to press for change in racial inequities.
Anyone who thought marching and rallies would be over due to the Obama presidency had a "foolish thought," says Jackson. "There's always been a competition for the attention of the president. Whoever has the most activity and strength gets on the priority list. … Marching empowers the president."
President Obama himself, during his historic campaign, repeatedly quoted Frederick Douglass, "Power concedes nothing without a demand."
Says Jackson, In 2010, nobody has to get arrested in order to make an impact, but "People who feel they can't do it alone feel courage when they do it together. Marches involve action. Moses marched when Egypt crossed the Red Sea to Cannon. Jesus marched on Palm Sunday. Ghandi marched. Dr. King Marched…We're encouraging people to march wherever you are."

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