12-15-2019  12:08 am   •   PDX Weather    •   SEA weather  
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4

NORTHWEST NEWS

Louisiana State University President Heading to Oregon Job

F. King Alexander will succeed Ed Ray, who is retiring from the position at Oregon State University at the end of June after 17 years as president. Ray will continue in a teaching role at the university

PHOTOS: Black Santa Visits Northwest African American Museum

The Skanner's Seattle photographer Susan Fried was on hand to snap some photos

English Language Learners' Success Translates Into a $25,000 Milken Educator Award for Teacher Julie Rowell

Oregon educator boosts student achievement and future prospects at Gresham High School

Portland Resident Hoping to Donate Kidney to Black Recipient

Fewer Black patients receive live kidney donations

NEWS BRIEFS

Friends of the Children Chapter Coming to Tacoma, Executive Director Announced

Organization empowers youth facing the greatest obstacles through the long-term support of professional mentors ...

Oregon Humane Society Celebrates the Adoption of the 11,000th Pet of 2019

Max, a two-year-old Labrador/Weimaraner mix, is going to a new home with the Dunlap family of Damascus ...

EPA Approves Funding for Oregon and Washington to Improve Drinking Water, Wastewater Infrastructure

States estimate $190 million for wastewater, $35 million for drinking water projects in Oregon, and $120 million for...

Conservation Breakthrough for Endangered Butterfly

The Oregon Zoo's breeding success provides new hope in an effort to save Oregon silverspots ...

Meet 80 Local Authors at OHS 52nd Holiday Cheer Book Sale and Signing

This free Oregon Historical Society event will be held this Sunday, December 8 from 12 p.m. – 4 p.m. ...

Man convicted of hate crime for punching transgender woman

PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) — An Oregon man convicted of punching a transgender woman has been sentenced to probation. Dominick Gonzales, 38, changed his plea Friday and was convicted of first-degree bias crime for punching the woman in Northwest Portland in September, Multnomah County District...

Oregon Supreme Court upholds district attorney suspension

PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) — The Oregon Supreme Court upheld a decision to suspend a district attorney for lying to investigators. Wasco County District Attorney Eric Nisley will be suspended from practicing law for two months beginning in February, the court ruled Thursday. The ruling upholds...

New Missouri coach Eli Drinkwitz predicts success

COLUMBIA, Mo. (AP) — Eli Drinkwitz was saying all the right things after being introduced as the new football coach at Missouri, laying out his vision for the once-proud program with unwavering confidence and bold proclamations.Then the former Appalachian State coach made a minor...

LSU's Burrow, Auburn's Brown named AP SEC players of year

LSU quarterback Joe Burrow is a unanimous selection as the offensive player of the year on The Associated Press All-Southeastern Conference football team.The top-ranked Tigers also have the SEC’s coach of the year in Ed Orgeron and the newcomer of the year in freshman cornerback Derek...

OPINION

Will You Answer the Call for Moral Revival?

In embracing and expanding the legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., Revs. Barber and Theoharis have asked Presidential candidates to consider a debate that focuses exclusively on poverty ...

What I’m Thankful For This Season

Ray Curry gives thanks for a human right that shaped our country throughout the 20th century and that made Thanksgiving possible for so many Americans who, like him, didn’t get here by way of the Mayflower ...

Congressional Black Caucus Members Visit U.S.-Mexico Border: “Mistreatment of Black Immigrants is Another ‘Stain on America’”

Members said they witnessed first-hand the deplorable treatment and plight of Black immigrants ...

Portland, I'm Ready

Last month I had the privilege to stand with hundreds of supporters and announce my intention to run for re-election ...

AFRICAN AMERICANS IN THE NEWS

Former Gary, Indiana, Mayor Richard Hatcher dead at 86

Former Gary Mayor Richard Hatcher, who became one of the first black mayors of a big U.S. city when he was elected in 1967, has died. He was 86.Hatcher died Friday night at a Chicago hospital, said his daughter, Indiana state Rep. Ragen Hatcher, a Gary Democrat. She did not provide a cause of her...

Reparations mark new front for US colleges tied to slavery

BUFFALO, N.Y. (AP) — The promise of reparations to atone for historical ties to slavery has opened new territory in a reckoning at U.S. colleges, which until now have responded with monuments, building name changes and public apologies. Georgetown University and two theological seminaries...

AP Exclusive: China tightens up on info after Xinjiang leaks

The Xinjiang regional government in China’s far west is deleting data, destroying documents, tightening controls on information and has held high-level meetings in response to leaks of classified papers on its mass detention camps for Uighurs and other predominantly Muslim minorities,...

ENTERTAINMENT

'Lemonade' by Beyoncé is named the AP's album of the decade

NEW YORK (AP) — The top 15 albums of the decade by Associated Press Music Editor Mesfin Fekadu:1. Beyoncé, “Lemonade”: At the beginning of this decade, Beyoncé was already the greatest singer of her generation. She won a record six Grammys in a single night, had women...

'Mad Men' actress Christina Hendricks files for divorce

LOS ANGELES (AP) — “Mad Men” actress Christina Hendricks filed for divorce Friday from her husband of 10 years, actor Geoffrey Arend. Hendricks filed the marriage dissolution documents in Los Angeles Superior Court, citing irreconcilable differences. The 44-year-old Hendricks...

‘Rise of Skywalker’ is almost here, but a dark side looms

LOS ANGELES (AP) — When Disney bought Lucasfilm for more than billion in 2012, there were lofty expectations of reviving “Star Wars” in spectacular hyper-speed fashion with a new trilogy that continued the story of Luke Skywalker and other beloved characters.The space saga...

U.S. & WORLD NEWS

Preservation or development? Brazil’s Amazon at a crossroads

TRAIRAO, Brazil (AP) — Night falls in Brazil’s Amazon and two logging trucks without license plates...

Under pressure, Hallmark pulls gay-themed wedding ads

NEW YORK (AP) — Under pressure from a conservative advocacy group, The Hallmark Channel has pulled ads for...

Home-cooked food in Iraqi square brings protesters together

BAGHDAD (AP) — In Baghdad’s Tahrir Square, there are the anti-government protesters demonstrating...

Greta Thunberg apologizes for 'against the wall' comment

MADRID (AP) — Teenage climate activist Greta Thunberg has apologized for saying politicians should be put...

Supporters of embattled Thai opposition party hold big rally

BANGKOK (AP) — Several thousand supporters of a popular opposition party in Thailand that is under threat...

North Korea says new tests will help it counter US threats

SEOUL, South Korea (AP) — North Korea said it successfully performed another “crucial test”...

McMenamins
Chris King Special to the NNPA from the St. Louis American

Reggie Clemons

ST. LOUIS (NNPA) - One day after a momentous hearing had been scheduled for death row inmate Reginald Clemons, Amnesty International came to St. Louis to release a new report on his case and to pledge funding and volunteers to the determined, grass-roots Justice for Reggie campaign.
National and regional representatives of the international human rights organization last week gathered with local and regional advocates for Clemons in front of the old Municipal Courts building in downtown St. Louis, where Clemons was tried and sentenced to death in 1993 for allegedly participating in the murders of Robin Kerry and Julie Kerry as an accomplice.
"We are here to see justice is delivered in our own backyard, not only in Iran and Iraq," said Jamal Watkins, Amnesty International USA's regional director for the Midwest.
Watkins was joined by Laura Moye, who directs Amnesty International USA's Death Penalty Abolition Campaign.
"Amnesty International is here today to raise the volume in the call for justice in a case that exemplifies the very worst problems in our death penalty system," Moye said.
In saying the group aims "to raise the volume," Moye acknowledged ongoing efforts by the Justice for Reggie campaign, led by Jamala Rogers, Clemons' mother Vera Thomas and his stepfather, Bishop Reynolds Thomas. This campaign has been embraced by the American Civil Liberties Union and the NAACP. Representatives from all of these groups spoke briefly on May 11.
Amnesty's timing in releasing its 16-page report, Death by Prosecutorial Misconduct and a "Stacked Jury," on May 11 seems tied to a date that should have been pivotal for Clemons, but was not. Judge Michael Manners, the special master appointed by the Missouri Supreme Court to gather new evidence and review the case, originally had scheduled May 10 as the new hearing date for Clemons.
However, the hearing was postponed after Nels C. Moss, who prosecuted Clemons in 1993, told the Missouri Attorney General's Office on March 2 "that he had recently been told of the existence of a rape kit located at the St. Louis Police Department Crime Lab," according to a letter faxed to Manners by the AG's office.
A rape kit is a body of forensic evidence collected when a rape is suspected; it does not imply that a rape has occurred. This evidence was collected from a body retrieved from the Mississippi River that was identified as Julie Kerry's corpse. The body of Robin Kerry was never found.
On March 25, Manners was informed that Clemons' attorneys and the AG had agreed to submit the new evidence to DNA testing, forcing the postponement of the May 10 hearing date. No new date has been set.
May 10, 2010 was scheduled to be a culminating moment in a shocking and historic process that started on June 30, 2009, when the Missouri Supreme Court appointed Manners – a 16th Circuit judge in Indepedence – as special master with subpoena powers to reconsider Clemons' most recent Writ of Habeas Corpus. This opened a new evidence phase in the case of a man who had been condemned to die less than two weeks earlier, on June 17.
The June 17 execution date – which had been set by the same court that would suddenly reopen the Clemons case to new evidence – was suspended when a federal court issued a stay. The State had condemned Clemons to die while he had a federal appeal pending concerning the Missouri Department of Corrections' ability to administer its own execution protocols without violating his constitutional protections against cruel and unusual punishment.
While detailed and passionate, the Amnesty International report covers no new ground. It restates familiar points about Clemons' allegations – filed the day after he was interrogated in 1991 – that St. Representatives of Amnesty International, joined by other supporters of death row inmate Reginald Clemons.

Louis detectives violated his constitutional rights to silence and counsel and beat a scripted confession out of him.
Police denied these accusations, though Judge Michael David ordered Clemons taken to the hospital for treatment of injuries when he was arraigned after the interrogation. Further, the St. Louis Metropolitan Police Department settled with Thomas Cummins for $150,000 for accusations of police brutality – against some of the same detectives, working the same case. Cummins, a cousin of the Kerrys', was the first suspect in the murders and initially confessed to a role in his the girls' deaths. He testified against Clemons as Moss' star witness and received his settlement from the police on the day Clemons was sentenced to death.
Clemons' confession – to rape, not murder – was permitted as evidence in court, which should not have been done if the confession was coerced and obtained without a lawyer after counsel had been requested.
Though Clemons was never prosecuted on rape charges, they were used against him as a "sentence enhancer" when Moss successfully pushed for the death penalty.
The Amnesty report also rehashes familiar evidence that the judge allowed Moss to stack the jury against Clemons by improperly excluding jurors. Clemons, one of three African-American youth accused of murdering two young White women, was judged by a jury with only two Black jurors (out of 12) in a city that is slightly more than half Black.
The Amnesty report cites a 2002 federal ruling on a Clemons appeal that "vacation of the death penalty is required when even one juror is improperly excluded. Here there were six."
The Amnesty report takes familiar aspects of the Clemons case and places them in the context of similar national and international cases. For example, the lack of physical evidence in the Clemons conviction – which makes the sudden surfacing of the rape kit so controversial – has drawn comparisons to the Troy Davis death penalty case in Georgia, which is being reopened under U.S. Supreme Court mandate.
Speaking on behalf of the Justice for Reggie campaign, Jamala Rogers thanked Amnesty for the report "and for committed resources in the future." Watkins of Amnesty said the group had committed volunteers and funds, though there was no set budget for the campaign.
Redditt Hudson of the ACLU of Eastern Missouri said Amnesty's decision to join the campaign is "an amazing boost. We are closer than we have ever been to actual justice for Reggie Clemons, Robin Kerry and Julie Kerry."
The Amnesty report is available at www.amnestyusa.org/reggie.

mlkbreakfast2020 tickets 300x180

Martha Redbone Trio
Oregon Lottery Scoreboard app download
Calendar

Photo Gallery

Photos and slide shows of local events

Crown Royal Boss Play the Game
OR Lottery Holiday 2019 scratch its