10-17-2019  3:56 am   •   PDX Weather    •   SEA weather  
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4

NORTHWEST NEWS

Hank Willis Thomas Exhibit Opens at Portland Art Museum

One of the most important conceptual artists of our time, his works examine the representation of race and the politics of visual culture

Grocery Workers Union Ratifies Contract with Stores

The United Food and Commercial Workers Union has agreed a three-year contract for stores in Oregon and Southwest Washington

PCC Weighing Community Input on Workforce Training Center, Affordable Housing in Cully

Portland Community College is compiling the results of door-to-door and online surveys

Lawsuit Filed Against Hilton Hotels in “Calling His Mother While Black” Discrimination Case

Jermaine Massey was ousted from the DoubleTree Hotel in Portland where he was a guest and forced to find lodging at around midnight

NEWS BRIEFS

The Black Man Project Kicks Off National Tour in Seattle

The first in a series of interactive conversations focused on Black men and vulnerability takes place in Seattle on October 25 ...

Protesters Rally in Ashland to Demand 'Impeach Trump Now'

Activists are rallying in Ashland Sunday Oct, 13 to demand impeachment proceedings ...

Black Women Help Kick off Sustainable Building Week

The event will be held at Portland’s first and only “green building” owned and operated by African-American women ...

Voter Registration Deadline for the November Special Election is Oct. 15 

The Special Election in Multnomah County will be held on Nov. 5, 2019 ...

Franklin High School’s Mercedes Muñoz Named Oregon Teacher of the Year

In a letter of recommendation, Muñoz was referred to as “a force of nurture.” ...

Oregon officer tower receives building sustainability award

PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) — One of Oregon's largest office buildings has achieved the highest level of certification from an organization promoting sustainability in building design, construction and operation.The Oregonian/OregonLive reported Wednesday that U.S. Bancorp Tower in Portland has...

Oregon waterway pesticide levels fall due to farming changes

SALEM, Ore. (AP) — Environmental regulators say pesticide levels in some Oregon waterways have dropped to fractions of former concentrations due to voluntary changes by farmers.The Capital Press reported Wednesday that the state Department of Environmental Quality found that growers who...

Bryant bounces back to lead Missouri over Mississippi

COLUMBIA, Mo. (AP) — Last week, when he heard a pop in his left knee after being hit low, Missouri quarterback Kelly Bryant briefly saw his college football career pass before his eyes. The injury wasn't as bad as it looked, and Bryant played like his old self in a 38-27 victory over...

Missouri out to stop Ole Miss ground game in SEC matchup

Ole Miss coach Matt Luke has watched every game Missouri has played this season, and he was no doubt excited by the way Wyoming ran wild against the Tigers in their season opener.It should have portended good things for the Rebels' own vaunted rushing attack.But the more Luke looked at the video,...

OPINION

Atatiana Jefferson, Killed by Police Officer in Her Own Home

Atatiana Jefferson, a biology graduate who worked in the pharmaceutical industry and was contemplating becoming a doctor, lived a life of purpose that mattered ...

“Hell No!” That Is My Message to Those Who Would Divide Us 

Upon release from the South African jail, Nelson Mandela told UAW Local 600 members “It is you who have made the United States of America a superpower, a leader of the world" ...

Rep. Janelle Bynum Issues Response to the Latest Statement from Clackamas Town Center

State legislator questions official response after daughter questioned for ‘loitering’ in parking lot ...

Why Would HUD Gut Its Own Disparate Impact Rule?

"You can’t expand housing rights by limiting civil protections. The ’D’ in HUD doesn’t stand for ‘Discrimination’" ...

AFRICAN AMERICANS IN THE NEWS

UK Labour lawmaker leaves party, says Corbyn unfit to serve

LONDON (AP) — A longtime U.K. Labour legislator has left the opposition party and warned that leader Jeremy Corbyn is unfit to become prime minister.Louise Ellman said Thursday she is leaving the party after 55 years because of Corbyn's failure to confront mounting anti-Semitism in its...

Cause for hope and caution following police shooting in home

In the days after Atatiana Jefferson's killing in her own home by a white Fort Worth police officer, many in the black community say they've seen at least initial signs of swifter action with the officer's arrest, but also are noticing some recurring and troubling themes.These include the release...

Fort Worth faith leaders want judge to enforce police reform

FORT WORTH, Texas (AP) — Community and faith leaders on Wednesday called on the Trump administration to open a civil rights investigation into the Fort Worth Police Department in the wake of a white officer's fatal shooting of a black woman in her home, saying the goal should be a police...

ENTERTAINMENT

2 writers claim they deserve credit on Lizzo's 'Truth Hurts'

NEW YORK (AP) — There's a debate about the truth behind Lizzo's "Truth Hurts."Lizzo's breakthrough tune, which spent six weeks on top of Billboard's Hot 100 chart this year, features the signature line: "I just took a DNA test, turns out I'm 100 percent that bitch." The lyric originated from...

Review: Pattinson and Dafoe shine in 'The Lighthouse'

Enter "The Lighthouse " at your own risk.This is a stark, moody, surreal and prolonged descent into seaside madness that will surely not be for everyone. But those who do choose to go on this black-and-white journey with Robert Pattinson and Willem Dafoe will ultimately find it a rewarding one,...

Farrow books sells across Australia despite legal threat

CANBERRA, Australia (AP) — Ronan Farrow's new book is being sold in Australia despite threats of defamation lawsuits that the Pulitzer-winning journalist believes led some Australian retailers to drop the bestseller."Catch and Kill" covers events leading to Farrow's New Yorker magazine...

U.S. & WORLD NEWS

Dubai bets billions that Expo 2020 won't be a desert mirage

DUBAI, United Arab Emirates (AP) — It rises out of what were once rolling sand dunes stretching toward the...

Chicago teachers to strike in nation's 3rd largest district

CHICAGO (AP) — Chicago parents and community groups are scrambling to prepare for a massive teachers'...

Cause for hope and caution following police shooting in home

In the days after Atatiana Jefferson's killing in her own home by a white Fort Worth police officer, many in the...

London commuters scuffle with climate activists

LONDON (AP) — Angry commuters scuffled with climate activists who climbed onto the roofs of trains early...

Former Nazi SS guard, 93, going on trial in Hamburg

HAMBURG, Germany (AP) — From his post as a young SS private in a watchtower in Nazi Germany's Stutthof...

Frustration and pride in Canada after a year of legal pot

VANCOUVER, British Columbia (AP) — The weed is expensive, the selection is limited, the black market...

McMenamins
Hope Yen Associated Press Writer

WASHINGTON (AP) -- As the U.S. census nears its final stages, the government is preparing for possible debacles that could derail its $15 billion head count, from mass identity theft and lawsuits to homeowners who refuse to answer their doors.
Census Bureau documents, obtained by The Associated Press, underscore the highly fragile nature of the high-stakes population count before the government dispatches some 700,000 temporary workers to visit homes, beginning in May.
The preparedness efforts are not entirely new. Previous censuses had contingency plans in place, at least conceptually, and the Census Bureau has never failed to meet its constitutional mandate of delivering population counts by Dec. 31 each decennial year.
But this is the first time the Census has detailed -- in 300 pages of internal documents released under the Freedom of Information Act -- specific risks to the once-a-decade government count. It's part of the bureau's approach to handling threats that could undermine accuracy, omit large segments of the public or add to already ballooning costs.
Many of the documents proved telling, even with portions redacted or withheld for security reasons.
``Considering the volume of data that the Bureau of Census gathers during the census, some loss of confidential data is bound to occur,'' one document bluntly states. Citing past missteps, such as the loss of work laptops by census employees in 2006, it details a rapid-response effort that includes notification of authorities, if appropriate, as well as free credit monitoring for potential identity theft victims.
One document says the ``No. 1 concern'' could be a refusal by immigrants to participate.
Placing a cap on costs if immigrants try to evade the count, the response plan notes that a census worker will attempt to visit a home six times at most -- or fewer, if a resident makes clear he won't cooperate -- before the worker questions neighbors to get the information. If that fails, the Census Bureau will statistically impute data based on characteristics of neighboring households.
In 2000, imputation, a statistical method that was not part of previous court battles over statistical sampling, increased the U.S. population by 1.1 million, particularly among urban racial minorities who would have been missed by a head count. Census Bureau director Robert Groves has ruled out sampling but not other statistical methods.
Another risk being monitored by the Census Bureau is the possibility of a conservative boycott following recent rhetoric, including one blogger's threat to pull out a shotgun to scare away census workers. The White House condemned the remarks Tuesday, and the bureau said it remains on the lookout for signs of a boycott or other trouble. Conservatives who refuse to participate may also be counted by way of neighbor questioning or statistical imputation.
``With these things, anything can turn on a dime, implode and impact our ability to recruit staff and gain cooperation,'' Arnold Jackson, the bureau's associate director for the decennial census, said in an interview. ``We also remain terribly concerned about safety.''
He said the bureau has tightened security procedures and boosted targeted advertising to specific groups, including a public service announcement released this week featuring President George W. Bush's former political adviser, Karl Rove. Still, while there have been anecdotal reports that conservatives may fill out only the number of people in their households, Jackson says there has been little sign of incomplete census forms received so far.
Jackson said the Census Bureau will tap into its reserve fund of roughly $7 million for ad buys in low-response regions, which he identified as having predominantly ``non-English speaking households, areas of heavy concentration of minority groups, such as African-American and Latino, and urbanized areas.''
Currently, the mail participation rate for the 2010 census is 63 percent, and officials remain cautiously optimistic they will be able to match, if not top, the 2000 mail-back rate of 72 percent by the time the Census Bureau winds down its mail-in operation in late April. From May to July, census takers are sent to homes that do not mail back forms.
Other potential risks include:
--Information technology breakdowns. A key software system used to schedule, deploy and pay census takers is full of defects, and its ability to handle a massive payroll of more than 600,000 temporary employees who begin work in May remains in doubt. Robert Goldenkoff, a director at the Government Accountability Office, believes the census could face serious delays if IT problems aren't fixed soon; the Census Bureau says it's dealing with the problem.
-- Lawsuits. Census officials are calling it ``relatively certain'' that they will be sued by at least one state that just misses gaining an additional U.S. House seat. The state will probably move quickly ``in order to potentially reverse the December 2010 announcement'' of the official head count figures, according to documents. Officials said litigation could involve outreach to non-English speaking communities or census methodology, such as the count of prisoners, non-citizens or religious missionaries overseas.
-- Mass retirements. A significant number of Census Bureau employees are now eligible to retire, and the 2010 count could be in peril if there is a mass exodus during peak census periods. So far, however, there has been no sign of that, according to documents. In the meantime, the bureau is developing detailed plans to make the learning curve shorter for newly hired employees.

mlkbreakfast2020 tickets 300x180

Pacific University Master in Fine Arts Writing
Calendar

Photo Gallery

Photos and slide shows of local events

Carpentry Professionals