07-14-2020  4:11 pm   •   PDX and SEA Weather
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NORTHWEST NEWS

I-5 Expansion Loses Support of Albina Vision, City

Gov. Brown says project must have support of local Black community 

Justice Department to Investigate Portland Protest Shooting

Donavan LaBella was standing with both arms in the air holding a large speaker across the street from the courthouse when a federal officer fired a less-lethal round at his head

Seattle Mayor, City Council at Odds Over 50% Police Cut

Seattle Mayor Jenny Durkan says the City Council has failed to speak with the police chief or conduct sufficient research

OSU, UO Among 20 Universities Filing Federal Lawsuit in Oregon Over International Student Order

The lawsuit, filed today, seeks to protect the educational status of nearly 3,500 students attending OSU

NEWS BRIEFS

NNPA Livestreams With Congresswomen Alexandria Ocasio Cortez and Val Demings

The audience has an opportunity to be an interactive part of the interview ...

Black Women Often Ignored By Social Justice Movements

‘Intersectional invisibility’ may lead to Black women’s exclusion, study finds ...

Deadline is July 15 to Pay Portland's $35 Arts Tax

The tax, approved by voters in 2012, supports arts education and grants ...

Oregon National Guard Completes Wildland Firefighter Training

The training was conducted using funds that were allocated to the Department of Defense by Congress to enable the National Guard to...

OSU Science Pub Focuses on Influence of Black Lives Matter

The influence of the Black Lives Matter movement will be the focus of a virtual Oregon State University Science Pub on July 13 ...

Pause for phased reopening extended through July 28

OLYMPIA, Wash. (AP) — Washington Gov. Jay Inslee announced Tuesday that the statewide pause for counties looking to advance from their current stage of economic reopening will continue though at least July 28 and he warned there is a “significant risk” that parts of the economy...

Portland students won't have in-person full-time classes

PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) — Portland Public Schools has set a tentative Sept. 14 start date for the 2020-21 academic year, but the state’s largest district will only have students attend in-person classes two days per week, if at all. Students and families should be ready to go online...

Iowa defensive back Jack Koerner hurt in jet ski accident

IOWA CITY, Iowa (AP) — Iowa defensive back Jack Koerner sustained serious injuries when he and a passenger on a jet ski collided with a boat on the Lake of the Ozarks in Missouri.According to a police report, Koerner and Cole Coffin were hurt at about 6:30 p.m. Friday when their watercraft...

Missouri football program pushes again for racial justice

COLUMBIA, Mo. (AP) — Ryan Walters had just arrived at the University of Missouri to coach safeties for the football program when a series of protests related to racial injustice led to the resignations of the system president and the chancellor of its flagship campus.The student-led movement...

OPINION

COMMENTARY: Real Table Talk

Chaplain Debbie Walker provides helpful insight for self-preservation, and care tips for your family, your neighbors, and your community circles ...

Commissioner Hardesty Responds To Federal Troop Actions Towards Protesters

This protester is still fighting for their life and I want to be clear: this should never have happened. ...

Recent Protests Show Need For More Government Collective Bargaining Transparency

Since taxpayers are ultimately responsible for funding government union contract agreements, they should be allowed to monitor the negotiation process ...

The Language of Vote Suppression

A specific kind of narrative framing is used to justify voter suppression methods and to cover up the racism that motivates their use. ...

AFRICAN AMERICANS IN THE NEWS

Trump bristles at question about police killing Blacks

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump bristled at a reporter's question about police killing African Americans and defended the right to display the Confederate flag as he continued to play into racial divisions in a pair of interviews Tuesday.In one interview, Trump seemed taken aback...

Ole Miss moves Confederate statue from prominent campus spot

JACKSON, Miss. (AP) — A Confederate monument that’s long been a divisive symbol at the University of Mississippi was removed Tuesday from a prominent spot on the Oxford campus, just two weeks after Mississippi surrendered the last state flag in the U.S. with the Confederate battle...

Oklahoma school board forms panel to address Redskins mascot

TULSA, Okla. (AP) — An Oklahoma school board decided to appoint a committee that would reevaluate the district's Redskins mascot amid conversations about removing controversial names and images across the country.Union Public Schools board members voted unanimously Monday to form the panel,...

ENTERTAINMENT

Evening news programs outpace prime time television

NEW YORK (AP) — The broadcast networks might want to consider promoting David Muir, Lester Holt and Norah O'Donnell, at least in the summer months.ABC's Muir-hosted “World News Tonight” and NBC's “Nightly News” with Holt both averaged more viewers than any single...

Review: Handsome, broken Aussies connect in ‘Dirt Music’

Everyone is sad in the Australian indie “ Dirt Music,” a sprawling story about a small fishing town, an affair and the dark secrets that tie everyone together. But at least the Western Australia setting is pretty, and the people are, too. The film stars Kelly Macdonald as Georgie, a...

Times editor resigns, saying she was harassed for her ideas

NEW YORK (AP) — Bari Weiss, an opinion editor at The New York Times, quit her job on Tuesday with a public resignation letter that alleged harassment and a hostile work environment created by people who disagreed with her.Andrew Sullivan, another prominent journalist who expressed concern...

U.S. & WORLD NEWS

'Mythbusters' star Grant Imahara dies from brain aneurysm

LOS ANGELES (AP) — Grant Imahara, the longtime host of Discovery Channel’s...

Biden's [scripts/homepage/home.php] trillion climate plan aims to reframe debate

WILMINGTON, Del. (AP) — Joe Biden released a [scripts/homepage/home.php] trillion plan on Tuesday to boost investment in clean...

Small businesses worldwide fight for survival amid pandemic

Hour after hour in the dark, Chander Shekhar’s mind raced ahead to morning.More than three months had...

Russia seeks prison terms for 3 youth group members

MOSCOW (AP) — Russian authorities on Tuesday demanded prison terms for three members of a youth group...

Wait 'til next year: Giving up on 2020, looking toward 2021

NEW YORK (AP) — This was supposed to be the year of the comeback for Boysie Dikobe, a South African dancer...

France says 'merci' to virus heroes on poignant Bastille Day

PARIS (AP) — Medics in white coats replaced uniformed soldiers as stars of France’s Bastille Day...

McMenamins
Hope Yen Associated Press Writer

WASHINGTON (AP) -- As the U.S. census nears its final stages, the government is preparing for possible debacles that could derail its $15 billion head count, from mass identity theft and lawsuits to homeowners who refuse to answer their doors.
Census Bureau documents, obtained by The Associated Press, underscore the highly fragile nature of the high-stakes population count before the government dispatches some 700,000 temporary workers to visit homes, beginning in May.
The preparedness efforts are not entirely new. Previous censuses had contingency plans in place, at least conceptually, and the Census Bureau has never failed to meet its constitutional mandate of delivering population counts by Dec. 31 each decennial year.
But this is the first time the Census has detailed -- in 300 pages of internal documents released under the Freedom of Information Act -- specific risks to the once-a-decade government count. It's part of the bureau's approach to handling threats that could undermine accuracy, omit large segments of the public or add to already ballooning costs.
Many of the documents proved telling, even with portions redacted or withheld for security reasons.
``Considering the volume of data that the Bureau of Census gathers during the census, some loss of confidential data is bound to occur,'' one document bluntly states. Citing past missteps, such as the loss of work laptops by census employees in 2006, it details a rapid-response effort that includes notification of authorities, if appropriate, as well as free credit monitoring for potential identity theft victims.
One document says the ``No. 1 concern'' could be a refusal by immigrants to participate.
Placing a cap on costs if immigrants try to evade the count, the response plan notes that a census worker will attempt to visit a home six times at most -- or fewer, if a resident makes clear he won't cooperate -- before the worker questions neighbors to get the information. If that fails, the Census Bureau will statistically impute data based on characteristics of neighboring households.
In 2000, imputation, a statistical method that was not part of previous court battles over statistical sampling, increased the U.S. population by 1.1 million, particularly among urban racial minorities who would have been missed by a head count. Census Bureau director Robert Groves has ruled out sampling but not other statistical methods.
Another risk being monitored by the Census Bureau is the possibility of a conservative boycott following recent rhetoric, including one blogger's threat to pull out a shotgun to scare away census workers. The White House condemned the remarks Tuesday, and the bureau said it remains on the lookout for signs of a boycott or other trouble. Conservatives who refuse to participate may also be counted by way of neighbor questioning or statistical imputation.
``With these things, anything can turn on a dime, implode and impact our ability to recruit staff and gain cooperation,'' Arnold Jackson, the bureau's associate director for the decennial census, said in an interview. ``We also remain terribly concerned about safety.''
He said the bureau has tightened security procedures and boosted targeted advertising to specific groups, including a public service announcement released this week featuring President George W. Bush's former political adviser, Karl Rove. Still, while there have been anecdotal reports that conservatives may fill out only the number of people in their households, Jackson says there has been little sign of incomplete census forms received so far.
Jackson said the Census Bureau will tap into its reserve fund of roughly $7 million for ad buys in low-response regions, which he identified as having predominantly ``non-English speaking households, areas of heavy concentration of minority groups, such as African-American and Latino, and urbanized areas.''
Currently, the mail participation rate for the 2010 census is 63 percent, and officials remain cautiously optimistic they will be able to match, if not top, the 2000 mail-back rate of 72 percent by the time the Census Bureau winds down its mail-in operation in late April. From May to July, census takers are sent to homes that do not mail back forms.
Other potential risks include:
--Information technology breakdowns. A key software system used to schedule, deploy and pay census takers is full of defects, and its ability to handle a massive payroll of more than 600,000 temporary employees who begin work in May remains in doubt. Robert Goldenkoff, a director at the Government Accountability Office, believes the census could face serious delays if IT problems aren't fixed soon; the Census Bureau says it's dealing with the problem.
-- Lawsuits. Census officials are calling it ``relatively certain'' that they will be sued by at least one state that just misses gaining an additional U.S. House seat. The state will probably move quickly ``in order to potentially reverse the December 2010 announcement'' of the official head count figures, according to documents. Officials said litigation could involve outreach to non-English speaking communities or census methodology, such as the count of prisoners, non-citizens or religious missionaries overseas.
-- Mass retirements. A significant number of Census Bureau employees are now eligible to retire, and the 2010 count could be in peril if there is a mass exodus during peak census periods. So far, however, there has been no sign of that, according to documents. In the meantime, the bureau is developing detailed plans to make the learning curve shorter for newly hired employees.

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