10-17-2021  5:59 pm   •   PDX and SEA Weather
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NORTHWEST NEWS

Oregon Set to Expand Hotline for Bias Crime Reporting

With a rise in hate crimes and bias incidents in Oregon and nationwide the two-person office just couldn’t handle the volume.

Portland Shootings Prompt DA to Spend $1M to Handle Cases

Multnomah County plans to hire four prosecutors and two investigators to help with an increasing caseload of homicide investigations

Cascadia Whole Health Honors Community Justice Leader, Fine Artist with Culture of Caring Awards

Erika Preuitt and Jeremy Okai Davis recognized for positive contributions to community.

Salem-Keizer School Boards Adopts Anti-Racism Resolution

The Salem-Keizer school board has voted to adopt a resolution outlining the board’s commitment to equity and anti-racism.

NEWS BRIEFS

Joint Center Commends Senator Whitehouse for Hiring Monalisa Dugué as Chief of Staff

Dugué is one of two Black Chiefs of Staff in the Senate ...

FBI Offers up to $25,000 for Information in Mass Shooting Event

18-year-old Makayla Maree Harris killed and six others injured in a Portland shooting on July 17, 2021 ...

Nearly 100 Animals Seized From Woofin Palooza Forfeited to MCAS

A Multnomah County Circuit Court judge has ruled that dogs and cats seized from an unlicensed facility named Woofin Palooza are now...

City of Seattle Office and Sound Transit Finalize No-Cost Land Transfer for Affordable Housing Development

Rainier Valley Homeownership Initiative will create at least 100 for-sale homes, permanently affordable to low- and moderate-income...

Sierra Club Reacts to Rep. Schrader’s Comments on Climate Change

Schrader Calls Climate Change “biggest threat to Americans” after voting against key policy in committee ...

Clark County deputies shoot, kill suspect after pursuit

VANCOUVER, Wash. (AP) — Authorities say police shot and killed an assault suspect after a pursuit near Vancouver in southwest Washington. The Columbian reports that about 2:20 a.m. Sunday, Clark County deputies tried to stop a car in the Orchards area associated with someone...

Risky business: Some Capitol riot defendants forgo lawyers

Some of the defendants charged in the storming of the U.S. Capitol are turning away defense lawyers and electing to represent themselves, undeterred by their lack of legal training or repeated warnings from judges. That choice already has led to some curious legal maneuvers and...

No. 21 Texas A&M runs over Missouri, 35-14

COLUMBIA, Mo. (AP) — Texas A&M coach Jimbo Fisher warned his team all week that it couldn’t afford a letdown after its upset of top-ranked Alabama. His message got through, as the 21st-ranked Aggies buried Missouri early in a 35-14 victory Saturday. “We preached it,...

No. 21 Texas A&M heads to Mizzou after 'Bama upset win

No. 21 Texas A&M (4-2, 1-2 SEC) at Missouri (3-3, 0-2), Saturday at noon EDT (SEC Network). Line: Texas A&M by 9 1/2, according to FanDuel Sportsbook. Series record: Texas A&M leads 8-7. WHAT’S AT STAKE? ...

OPINION

How Food Became the Perfect Beachhead for Gentrification

What could be the downside of fresh veggies, homemade empanadas and a pop-up restaurant specializing in banh mis? ...

Homelessness, Houselessness in the Richest Country in the World: An Uncommon Logic

When and why did the United States of America chose the wealth of a few over the health, wealth, and well-being of so many ...

American Business Leaders Step Up to Fight Inequities in the South

With COVID-19 still an omnipresent concern and the country’s recovery still very much in jeopardy, individuals, families, and communities are struggling to deal with issues that have only been exacerbated by the pandemic. ...

Waters Statement on 20th Anniversary of September 11 Attacks

Twenty years ago today, our nation suffered devastating terrorist attacks on our soil and against our people that wholly and completely changed the world as we knew it. ...

AFRICAN AMERICANS IN THE NEWS

Center-right parties lead in Kosovo's municipal vote

PRISTINA, Kosovo (AP) — Center-right opposition parties in Kosovo were leading in Sunday's municipal election but runoffs will still be needed to decide half of the winners, according to early results. About 1.9 million voters in the small Balkan nation were electing mayors...

Removed Robert E. Lee statue now on display at Texas resort

TERLINGUA, Texas (AP) — A statue of Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee that the city of Dallas removed from a park and later sold in an online auction is now on display at a golf resort in West Texas. The bronze sculpture, which was removed from the Dallas park in September 2017,...

Texas GOP advances new maps that would tighten slipping grip

AUSTIN, Texas (AP) — Texas Republicans on Saturday night closed in on redrawn U.S. House maps that would shore up their eroding dominance as voters peel away from the GOP in the state’s booming suburbs. In a key late-night vote in the Texas House, Republicans gave early...

ENTERTAINMENT

Actors of Indian descent proud to lead Broadway's 'Aladdin'

NEW YORK (AP) — As kids growing up in different states, Shoba Narayan and Michael Maliakel shared a love of one favorite film — “Aladdin.” Both are of Indian descent, and in the animated movie, they saw people who looked like them. That shared love has gone full-circle...

For Vicky Krieps, life and art blend on ‘Bergman Island’

Vicky Krieps was not Mia Hansen-Løve's first choice to star in “ Bergman Island.” She wasn’t the second, third or 12th choice either because the role of Chris, a filmmaker who goes on a writing retreat to Fårö with her filmmaker husband, already belonged to Greta Gerwig. ...

Boo! Sitcom 'Ghosts' combos misfit spirits, feel-good charm

LOS ANGELES (AP) — The title seems to be a dead giveaway, but there’s more to the new comedy “Ghosts” than things that go bump in the night. “We totally think of this show as ‘What We Do in the Shadows’ meets 'Ted Lasso,” said producer Joe Wiseman. ...

U.S. & WORLD NEWS

Louisiana gators thrive, so farmers' return quota may drop

NEW ORLEANS (AP) — Once-endangered alligators are thriving in the wild, so Louisiana authorities are proposing a...

Top Democrats woo Black voters in Virginia governor's race

NORFOLK, Va. (AP) — Voting rights advocate Stacey Abrams on Sunday urged Black churchgoers to turn out for...

Father of suspect in UK lawmaker's slaying is 'traumatized'

LONDON (AP) — The father of a man held for the fatal stabbing of a British lawmaker during a meeting with local...

Ivory Coast's ex-leader Gbagbo vows return to political life

ABIDJAN, Ivory Coast (AP) — Former Ivorian President Laurent Gbagbo told supporters Sunday that he'll be...

Shooting in Syria could mark new phase in Israeli campaign

JERUSALEM (AP) — The death of a former Syrian Druse lawmaker, allegedly by Israeli sniper fire, could mark a new...

Center-right parties lead in Kosovo's municipal vote

PRISTINA, Kosovo (AP) — Center-right opposition parties in Kosovo were leading in Sunday's municipal election...

Brad Cain Associated Press Writer

SALEM, Oregon (AP) -- The Obama administration decision not to interfere in state medical marijuana laws has emboldened a citizen initiative to get the state of Oregon involved in providing the drug for residents who have permission to use it.
Medical marijuana advocates are seeking to put on the November ballot a measure to create a system in which state-licensed pot growers would distribute their crops to dispensaries where people could buy the drug to treat their ailments.
Currently, those people either have an approved provider grow it for them or grow it themselves.
On Monday, backers of the initiative turned in 61,000 petition signatures in hopes of qualifying the issue for the ballot. A total of 82,769 valid signatures are needed to qualify the measure, and backers have until July to collect up the remainder.
Oregon is one of 13 states that have legalized medical marijuana. On Monday, the New Jersey Legislature approved a bill that would make it the 14th state to allow chronically ill patients access to marijuana for medical reasons, and Democratic Gov. Jon Corzine, who supports the legislation, could sign it before leaving office next week, making it law.
Of the 13 states that have legalized medical marijuana, five of them -- including California -- make provision for dispensaries where patients can get the pot.
Because of earlier concerns about possible federal intervention, there had been no serious movement in Oregon to join the medical marijuana states with dispensaries.


LINKED STORIES

Medical Marijuana 6-5-10
Cannabis Caravan 6-6-10

Marinol a Defense 4-17-10

Cannabis Tax Act 4-7-10
 
Pot Dispensaries 1-13-10

Pot Café 11-24-09

The Key to Our Budget 9-28-09

Confusion in Washington 9-21-09

Could Yield Billions 7-9-09

But things changed last October, when the Obama administration announced it would not go after people in states who use medical marijuana legally.
"It was a watershed event. It's really the thing that has made this ballot initiative viable," said John Sajo, executive director of the Voter Power Foundation, which is backing the measure and which helped draft Oregon's 1998 law.
Keith Stroup, spokesman for the National Organization for the Reform of Marijuana Laws in Washington, said that the Obama administration's stance will prompt other states to also consider marijuana dispensaries.
"Within a very few years, any state that has legal medical marijuana will certainly have a legal supply. They will all allow some kind of regulated dispensary," said Stroup, who founded NORML and is the group's legal counsel.
Oregon law allows registered patients to grow up to six mature marijuana plants or designate a grower to do it for them. But many patients don't want to do either.
"People should have a safe place to obtain cannabis. We should treat it like any other medication," said Alice Ivany, a Newport woman who uses marijuana to alleviate pain she's suffered since losing her lower left arm in a timber mill accident years ago.
Ivany is one of the co-sponsors of the proposed initiative that would require the state Health Division to license, inspect and audit growers and dispensaries. It also would create a program, administered by the state, to provide medical marijuana to indigent patients.
The program would be funded by license fees and taxes on growers and dispensaries.
Oregon's current medical marijuana program was enacted by voters in 1998, who approved an initiative measure setting it up by a 55-45 percent margin.
As of Jan. 1, 26,274 patients were registered with the state to use marijuana for medicinal purposes, with 5,836 more applications pending final approval. People with pending applications are allowed under state law to use medical marijuana.
It's been estimated that there are about 15,000 medical marijuana grow sites in Oregon, operated either by the user or an approved grower.
Any proposed expansion of Oregon's program is being opposed by some law enforcement officials. They cite a spike in the number of pot busts involving growers who have received state permission to cultivate a small amount of marijuana for medical use but who grow more than the law allows and sell it illegally on the street.
Umatilla County Sheriff John Trumbo said the proposed law would only make matters worse and that he thinks the best move would be to repeal the medical marijuana program altogether.
He said that with the expansion of the medical pot program, "you're taking a stop closer to legalizing marijuana use by anybody who wants to use it."
But Klamath County Sheriff Tim Evinger said the proposed expansion would be a step in the right direction.
"If, in fact, it is a needed drug, and it is providing a benefit to somebody who is ill, I frankly think it should be purchased by prescription at a pharmacy and produced by a commercial operation that is monitored, that is secured, and the quality, content and safety issues are addressed, just like any controlled substance that is prescribed," he said.
Sajo argues that Oregon's law needs to be updated so that all qualifying patients have convenient access to quality marijuana.
"Medical marijuana is here to stay," he said. "It's time for policy makers to figure out how to make it work effectively."

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