08-20-2019  3:23 pm   •   PDX Weather    •   SEA weather  
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4

NORTHWEST NEWS

Study: 38k in Portland Area Homeless at Some Point in 2017

A new Portland State University study says an estimated 38,000 people in Multnomah, Washington and Clackamas counties experienced homelessness at some point in 2017

Pacific Northwest Earthquake-Warning System Gets Funding Boost

The U.S. Geological Survey is greatly increasing funding for the region's seismic network, putting it on track to send public alerts of impending earthquake shaking within the next two years

Portland Public Schools Nearly Scammed out of $2.9m

District officials say Portland Public Schools was bilked for [scripts/homepage/home.php].9 million when a fraudster posing as one of the district's construction contractors hoodwinked employees into green-lighting the payment

Far-Right and Antifa Groups Both Claim Victory at Portland

With both the left and the right declaring victory following a long-hyped rally that had Portland, Oregon, on edge it seems the liberal city will continue to be a flashpoint in an increasingly divided country

NEWS BRIEFS

Police are Trying to Connect Floyd Leslie Hill to His Loved Ones

The Portland Police Bureau is asking for the community's help in locating the loved ones of Floyd Leslie Hill who passed away on...

Study Finds Lack of Racial Diversity in Cancer Drug Clinical Trials

New research published this week in JAMA Oncology has found a lack of racial and ethnic diversity in clinical trials for cancer drugs ...

Portland Parks, Partners Host Charles Jordan Birthday Celebration

A celebration of the life of one of Portland’s most influential leaders, held at his namesake community center ...

Matt Dishman Community Center Annual Block Party

The event will feature free food, arts and crafts, family fun, live music and more ...

Sara Boone Sworn in as Fire Chief

Boone will be the first African American fire chief in the city’s history ...

Ex-Oregon teacher sentenced for stealing K from district

ROSEBURG, Ore. (AP) — A former teacher in southwestern Oregon who stole more than ,000 from the Riddle School District has been sentenced to pay the money back as well as spend a week in jail.The News-Review reports 47-year-old Jennifer Lynn of Medford was sentenced Monday after...

3 killed in vehicle crash near Redmond

REDMOND, Ore. (AP) — Oregon State Police say three people were killed in a vehicle crash in central Oregon.KTVZ-TV reports the crash happened shortly before 11:30 a.m. Tuesday about 7 miles (11 kilometers) west of Redmond on Highway 126.Oregon State Police Sgt. Caleb Ratliff says an SUV was...

Ex-Clemson star Kelly Bryant takes over at QB for Missouri

COLUMBIA, Mo. (AP) — Barry Odom never seems stressed about the future, whether the Missouri coach is pondering tough sanctions handed down by the NCAA over a recruiting scandal or the fact that one of the most prolific passers in school history is now in the NFL.When it comes to the...

Missouri DE Williams pleads to misdemeanor, put on probation

COLUMBIA, Mo. (AP) — Missouri defensive end Tre Williams pleaded guilty to a misdemeanor and was sentenced to two years of unsupervised probation after prosecutors dropped a felony domestic assault charge.The Columbia Daily Tribune reports Williams pleaded guilty to peace disturbance and was...

OPINION

Avel Gordly's Statement in Advance of Aug. 17 Rally

'All we have on this planet is one another' ...

A National Crisis: Surging Hate Crimes and White Supremacists

Our history chronicles the range of hate crimes that have taken the lives of Latinos as well as Native Americans, Blacks, Jews, and the LGBTQ community ...

Calling Out Racism, White Supremacy and White Nationalism is More Vital Than Ever

Telling the truth, in its entirety, is the most objective stance any journalist can take on any subject ...

A Dog for Every Kind of Hunting: The Hound

The hound, in particular, is considered an all-purpose dog for every kind of hunting, on all types of terrain. ...

AFRICAN AMERICANS IN THE NEWS

Philadelphia police commissioner resigning, mayor says

PHILADELPHIA (AP) — The mayor of Philadelphia says the police commissioner is resigning over new allegations of sexual harassment and racial and gender discrimination against others in the department.Mayor Jim Kenney says that Richard Ross has been a terrific asset to the police department...

City sues to remove Confederate monument, citing free speech

NORFOLK, Va. (AP) — The city of Norfolk, Virginia, is claiming in a lawsuit that its free speech rights are being violated because a state law won't let it remove an 80-foot (24-meter) Confederate monument from its downtown.Norfolk's lawsuit employs a relatively novel and untested legal...

Malaysia bans Indian Muslim preacher from public activities

KUALA LUMPUR, Malaysia (AP) — Police said Tuesday an Indian Muslim preacher, wanted in India for alleged money laundering and hate speech, has been banned from public activities after racial slurs in his recent speeches sparked outrage in Malaysia.Zakir Naik was grilled a second time by...

ENTERTAINMENT

Mindy Kaling, 'Four Weddings': optimistic without apology

BEVERLY HILLS, Calif. (AP) — Mindy Kaling is optimistic about life. Got a problem with that?Kaling's sunny — yet clear-eyed — view is on display in her film "Late Night," in which she stars opposite Emma Thompson, and in the Hulu series "Four Weddings and a Funeral." Both...

Inspired by Fela, Nigeria's Burna Boy blazes trail in the US

NEW YORK (AP) — Burna Boy was only six years old when Afrobeat pioneer Fela Kuti passed away, but that was enough time for the future musician to be inspired."Everyone's got their hero," the 28-year-old Nigerian performer said. "For me, that's my hero."Kuti — the Nigerian musical icon...

25th Bond movie gets a title: 'No Time to Die'

NEW YORK (AP) — The 25th James Bond movie has a title: "No Time to Die."Producers announced the moniker Tuesday for the film that has long been referred to simply as "Bond 25.""No Time to Die" returns Daniel Craig to the role of 007. Lea Seydoux, Naomie Harris, Ben Whishaw and Ralph Fiennes...

U.S. & WORLD NEWS

Italian premier resigns, blames deputy for political crisis

ROME (AP) — Italian Premier Giuseppe Conte resigned Tuesday, blaming the collapse of his 14-month-old...

US envoy to resume talks with Taliban on ending Afghan war

KABUL, Afghanistan (AP) — The United States envoy negotiating with the Taliban for an end to nearly 18...

Sudan protesters, army announce new ruling body after deal

CAIRO (AP) — Sudan's pro-democracy movement and the army announced a joint ruling body on Tuesday, formally...

Italy prosecutor orders migrant rescue ship evacuated

MILAN (AP) — An Italian prosecutor ordered the seizure of a rescue ship and the immediate evacuation of...

Big questions linger as Russia shares radiation data

MOSCOW (AP) — Russia has resumed sharing data from radiation monitoring stations in Siberia after some were...

Trump says would be 'appropriate' for Russia to rejoin G-7

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump said Tuesday he'd like to see Russia readmitted to a group of the...

McMenamins
Rachel La Corte Associated Press Writer

OLYMPIA, Wash. (AP) -- In a decision that could give momentum to other efforts to expand voting to inmates, a federal appeals court ruled that incarcerated felons should be allowed to vote in Washington state.
There's a patchwork of laws across the nation concerning restoration of felons' voting rights, but only Maine and Vermont allow those behind bars to cast ballots.
The 2-1 ruling by a three-judge panel of the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals on Tuesday overturned the 2000 ruling of a district judge in Spokane. That judge had ruled that Washington state's felon disenfranchisement law did not violate the Voting Rights Act of 1965, and dismissed a lawsuit filed by a former prison inmate from Bellevue.
The two appellate judges ruled that disparities in the state's justice system "cannot be explained in race-neutral ways."
A spokeswoman said state Attorney General Rob McKenna is weighing the state's next step. Spokeswoman Janelle Guthrie said that they could either ask a larger group of judges from the 9th Circuit to reconsider the ruling or go straight to the U.S. Supreme Court. If appealed, it's likely that the state would seek a stay on inmate's ability to vote until the case is resolved.
While the ruling only currently covers Washington state, if it stands, Guthrie said it could be the basis for litigation in any area covered by the 9th Circuit -- Oregon, Idaho, Montana, California, Nevada, Arizona, Alaska, Hawaii, Guam and the Northern Marianas.
Of the more than 18,000 felons currently in state custody who could get their right to vote back under this ruling, 37.1 percent are minorities. Of that group, Blacks make up the largest percentage, at 19.2 percent.
The issues the ruling raises about racial bias in the justice system are not unique to Washington state, said Marc Mauer, executive director of The Sentencing Project, a Washington, D.C., group promoting sentencing reform.
"They are issues that permeate the justice system and are relevant in every state," he said.
Mauer said that an estimated 5.3 million people nationwide are ineligible to vote because of a felony conviction.
Tuesday's court's ruling is "an embarrassment," said Trent England, a policy director at Evergreen Freedom Foundation, a conservative think tank in Washington state. "`It flies in the face of precedent," he said. "Not only is felon disenfranchisement constitutional but it's good policy. People who commit the most heinous crimes should be deprived of their voice in our system of government at least for a time."
The lawsuit was filed by Muhammad Shabazz Farrakhan, formerly of Bellevue. He was serving a three-year sentence at the Washington State Penitentiary in Walla Walla for a series of felony-theft convictions when he sued the state in 1996.
Ultimately, five other inmates, all members of racial minority groups, joined as plaintiffs.
The lawsuit contended that because nonwhites make up a large percentage of the prison population, a state law prohibiting inmates and parolees from voting is illegal because it dilutes the electoral clout of minorities. That was a violation of the U.S. Voting Rights Act of 1965, the lawsuit said.
An attorney for Farrakhan equated disenfranchisement laws to poll taxes and literacy tests of the past.
"In this case, we have proved that the criminal justice system in this state is biased against African-Americans, and the impact has been a violation of their voting rights," said Larry Weiser, a law professor at Gonzaga University School of Law who is the lead attorney in the lawsuit.
The state contended that the lawsuit should be dismissed because the law was not intended to discriminate against minorities.
David Ammons, a spokesman for the state's head elections official, said that Secretary of State Sam Reed "supports minority rights, but believes it is a rational and reasonable sanction for society to demand that felons lose their voting rights while in prison or under community supervision."
Last year, lawmakers passed a law that allows convicted felons to reregister to vote once they're no longer on parole or probation. Previously, felons who were no longer in Washington state custody but owed court-ordered fines and restitution were not allowed to vote. Under the new law that took effect last July, voting rights could be revoked if a felon willingly fails to make regular payments on those financial obligations.
In her dissent, 9th Circuit Judge Margaret McKeown wrote that the majority "has charted territory that none of our sister circuits has dared to explore," and notes that three other appellate courts -- the 1st Circuit in a Massachusetts case, the 2nd Circuit in a New York case, and the 11th Circuit in a Florida case – "have all determined that vote denial challenges to felon disenfranchisement laws are not cognizable under the Voting Rights Act."
She wrote that since Washington state passed a law changing voting rights just last year, and after the 9th Circuit heard the Farrakhan case, the case should go back to district court.
"It is not our job to consider, in the first instance, the effect this new law has on plaintiffs' case and whether the totality of the circumstances analysis under ... the Voting Rights Act should be different now that plaintiffs' case remains viable only as to currently incarcerated felons," she wrote.
___
The case is Farrakhan v. Gregoire.


mlkbreakfast2020 tickets 300x180

PBOT Drivers Advisory Committee
Seattle Pay by Plate
Calendar

Photo Gallery

Photos and slide shows of local events

Carpentry Professionals