09-17-2020  11:44 pm   •   PDX and SEA Weather
Don't Call the Police for domestic disturbances
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NORTHWEST NEWS

Black and Jewish Community Join to Revive Historic Partnership

United in Spirit Oregon brings together members of the NAACP, Jewish Federation of Oregon, others to serve as peacemakers 

Feds Explored Possibly Charging Portland Officials in Unrest

Federal officials were told that Portland police officers were explicitly told not to respond to the federal courthouse

Latest: Report: Downed Power Lines Sparked 13 Oregon Fires

As wildfires continue to burn in Oregon and the west, here are today's updates.

Fires Raise Fight Over Climate Change Before Trump's Visit

The Democratic governors say the fires are a consequence of climate change, while the Trump administration has blamed poor forest management

NEWS BRIEFS

Free Masks and Gloves Now Available for Small Businesses

Businesses with fewer than 50 employees that are headquartered in Oregon with principal operations in Oregon are eligible. ...

Forest Service Explains 'Containment'

US Forest Service, Riverside Fire provides a special update to explain how they achieve wildfire containment. ...

Oregon Receives Approval of Federal Disaster Declaration for Wildfires

Decision will enable federal aid to begin flowing, as unprecedented wildfires ravage state and force evacuation of thousands ...

National Black Farmers' Association President Calls for Boycott of John Deere

Year after year, John Deere has declined NBFA's invitation to display its equipment at the 116,000-member organization's annual...

City of Vancouver Welcomes New Fire Chief

Brennan Blue is replacing Vancouver Fire Chief Joe Molina, who is retiring after 28 years. ...

US judge blocks Postal Service changes that slowed mail

SEATTLE (AP) — A U.S. judge on Thursday blocked controversial Postal Service changes that have slowed mail nationwide, calling them “a politically motivated attack on the efficiency of the Postal Service” before the November election.Judge Stanley Bastian in Yakima, Washington,...

Latest: Southern California forest fire burns near homes

The Latest on wildfires in the U.S. West (all times local):8 p.m.WRIGHTWOOD, Calif. — A stubborn, growing wildfire in mountains northeast of Los Angeles is moving toward homes. Evacuation warnings were issued Thursday evening for the small forest town of Wrightwood on the fire’s...

AP Top 25 Reality Check: When streaks end, but not really

For the first time since the end of the 2011 season, Ohio State is not ranked in the AP Top 25.The Buckeyes' streak of 132 straight poll appearances is the second-longest active streak in the country, behind Alabama's 198.Of course, in this strange season of COVID-19, Ohio State's streak was...

Potential impact transfers this season aren't limited to QBs

While most of the offseason chatter surrounding college football transfers inevitably focuses on quarterbacks, plenty of notable players at other positions also switched teams and could make major impacts for their new schools this fall.Miami may offer the clearest example of this.Quarterback...

OPINION

One Huge Lie Crystallized

The Democrats have cast the President as a failed leader, but Trump’s supporters painted him as a success and the last line of defense against radical socialism. ...

“Losers”???!!!

I am hoping that millions of us will teach Trump what it means to be a loser on November 3rd. ...

Letter to the Editor: Regarding 'Initially Supportive Some Community Leaders Criticize Move to Decriminalize Drugs'

I was surprised to see your article with the headline indicating Community Leaders' criticism of Oregon Measure 110. ...

AFRICAN AMERICANS IN THE NEWS

Trump heats up culture war in appeal to Wisconsin voters

MOSINEE, Wis. (AP) — President Donald Trump stepped up his rhetoric Thursday on cultural issues, aiming to boost enthusiasm among rural Wisconsin voters as he tries to repeat his path to victory four years ago. Making his fifth visit to the pivotal battleground state this year, Trump views...

Photos fuel concerns over in-custody death of La. Black man

Graphic photos that surfaced online this week appear to show deep bruises on the face of a Black man who died following a police chase in Louisiana last year, raising new questions about whether his injuries were caused by the crash that ended the chase or an ensuing struggle with state troopers....

Trump heats up culture war in appeal to Wisconsin voters

MOSINEE, Wis. (AP) — President Donald Trump stepped up his rhetoric Thursday on cultural issues, aiming to boost enthusiasm among rural Wisconsin voters as he tries to repeat his path to victory four years ago. Making his fifth visit to the pivotal battleground state this year, Trump views...

ENTERTAINMENT

Keith Urban finds musical connections across genre lines

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — This year was poised to be a busy one for Keith Urban, with a full year of touring as well as a Las Vegas residency. He wasn’t sure when he’d have time to finish his next album “Speed of Now Part 1” when the coronavirus pandemic halted live...

'The Batman' resumes UK production after positive COVID case

The U.K. production of “The Batman” is starting up again after being shut down earlier this month when an individual tested positive for COVID-19. A spokesperson for Warner Bros. said Thursday that filming had resumed after a hiatus for quarantine precautions. The studio has not...

Woody Allen's 'A Rainy Day in New York' to get U.S. release

NEW YORK (AP) — After being shelved for two years, Woody Allen's “A Rainy Day in New York" will finally land in U.S. theaters next month.MPI Media Group and Signature Entertainment announced Thursday that the companies will release “A Rainy Day in New York” in North...

U.S. & WORLD NEWS

'Forrest Gump' author Winston Groom dead at 77

FAIRHOPE, Ala. (AP) — Winston Groom, the writer whose novel “Forrest Gump” was made into a...

Photos fuel concerns over in-custody death of La. Black man

Graphic photos that surfaced online this week appear to show deep bruises on the face of a Black man who died...

Infection rates soar in college towns as students return

MUNCIE, Ind. (AP) — Just two weeks after students started returning to Ball State University last month,...

Austrian minister to Trump: No, we do not live in forests

BERLIN (AP) — The Austrian government has spoken up to correct U.S. President Donald Trump's claim that...

Banksy loses EU trademark fight with greeting card company

BRUSSELS (AP) — Street artist Banksy has lost a legal battle with a a greeting card company along with a...

Man of 'Hotel Rwanda' fame denied bail in terrorism case

KIGALI, Rwanda (AP) — A Rwandan court on Thursday denied bail to Paul Rusesabagina, whose story inspired...

Don't Call the Police for domestic disturbances
McMenamins
By The Skanner News

PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) -- The city of Portland has paid more than $3 million in the past five years to settle legal claims against police, including more than $850,000 for just one officer.
City attorneys say the payouts don't necessarily suggest police acted inappropriately, and they may be less costly than going to court.
The payout for officer Leo Besner included the city's largest settlement from a shooting -- $500,000 to the family of a man Besner shot while the man was on the phone with police negotiators.
Besner says police work is inherently risky and certain assignments put some officers in a position to face more claims.
But attorneys who regularly sue the city say the Portland Police Bureau is slow to act against officers repeatedly named in lawsuits who cost the city thousands of dollars.
City risk managers and police supervisors say they pay attention to litigation.
In recent years, they've changed policy and training when claims or lawsuits have pointed out problems.
"We're trying to identify any issues, areas of concern or corrective action that should take place," said Mike Palmer, the bureau's safety and risk officer. "We're watching these claims from Day One. We don't want to wait until after a large settlement."
Sgt. Scott Westerman, president of the Portland Police Association, says the city payouts infuriate officers.
"I think it's a travesty. The attorneys often say it's cheaper to pay out than it costs to try it to prove they're right. This is the part that disgusts most officers," Westerman said.
It's difficult to compare Portland with cities of similar size because Oregon caps public liability.
Samuel Walker, emeritus professor of criminal justice at the University of Nebraska at Omaha who has written about police oversight, says it's difficult to learn from the numbers alone.
"The payout comes years after the incident, so the figures for 2008 don't reflect what's happening now," Walker said.
But examining legal claims is an important way for agencies to discover patterns in policing or problems with certain officers, Walker said. "It's a matter of learning from it, asking what went wrong," he said.
In 2005, the city council directed the Independent Police Review Division to review tort claims and civil suits and initiate police internal investigations when warranted.
Last year, the division opened complaints on 13 of 163 civil claims. All but four were dismissed.

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