05-18-2022  2:38 am   •   PDX and SEA Weather
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NORTHWEST NEWS

Election Day-Ballots Need to be Dropped Off or Postmarked Before 8 P.M.

Today, May 17, 2022, is the last day to vote in the Primary Election. Voted ballots must be received at any county elections office in Oregon or Official Ballot Drop Site location tonight by 8 p.m., or mailed and postmarked by May 17, 2022 to be counted.

2022 Midterms: What to Watch as 5 States Hold Primaries

Tuesday, May 17, 2022 is the last day for voters to return ballots. Ballots that are mailed must be postmarked by election day. Ballots deposited in an official drop box must be received by 8 p.m. on election day.

No Sea Serpents, Mobsters but Tahoe Trash Divers Strike Gold

Scuba divers who spent a year cleaning up Lake Tahoe’s entire 72-mile shoreline have come away with what they hope will prove a valuable incentive

House Passes Bipartisan Update to Anti-Poverty Program Led by Bonamici, Thompson

The Community Services Block Grant (CSBG) program has not been updated since 1998.

NEWS BRIEFS

2 Pleasure Boats Catch Fire on Columbia River

Two pleasure boats caught fire on the Columbia River between Vancouver and Caterpillar Island Sunday afternoon. One boat sank,...

WA Childhood Immunization Rates Decline During Pandemic

Immunization rates have decreased by 13% in 2021 when compared to pre-pandemic level ...

Attorney General Rosenblum Warns Against Price Gouging of Baby Formula

This declaration will allow the Oregon Attorney General to take action against any business, or online vendor, who upsells the price...

WA High Court: Drivers Can Get DUIs for Driving While High

A decision that upholds the state’s decade-old law regulating marijuana use behind the wheel of a car. ...

Community Basketball Game and Discussion Events Work to Reduce Gun Violence

Basketball game features Black youth and police officers playing together ...

Ballot counting issues delay results in OR House primary

PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) — Issues with counting ballots in Oregon's third-largest county could delay for days a definitive result in a key U.S. House primary where Democratic Rep. Kurt Schrader was facing a strong challenge from a progressive candidate. Schrader was trailing Tuesday in...

Controversies sink reelection bid of GOP Rep. Cawthorn

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. Rep. Madison Cawthorn’s unexpected 2020 win made him the youngest member of Congress and a rising Republican star. Then the scandals started to pile up. On Tuesday, the 26-year-old conservative North Carolina firebrand left his election night party early,...

OPINION

Can Federal Lynching Law Help Heal America?

Despite decades of senseless delays, this new law pushes America to finally acknowledge that racism often correlates to a level of violence and terror woven into the very fabric of this country. ...

The Skanner News Endorsements: May Primary 2022

Primary election day is May 17, 2022. Read The Skanner's endorsements for this important election. ...

Men’s Voices Urgently Needed to Defend Reproductive Rights

For decades, men in increasing numbers have followed women’s lead in challenging gender-based violence and promoting gender equality, so why are we stuck when it comes to abortion? ...

Burying Black Cemeteries: Off the Record

It is a tragedy when we lose a loved one. That tragedy is compounded when are unable to visit their final resting place to honor and remember them. ...

AFRICAN AMERICANS IN THE NEWS

Sri Lankan protesters include Tamil victims in war memorial

COLOMBO, Sri Lanka (AP) — Sri Lankan protesters lit flames and offered prayers Wednesday remembering thousands — including ethnic Tamil civilians — killed in the final stages of the country’s decadeslong civil war, in the first-ever event where mostly majority ethnic Sinhalese openly...

Buffalo shooting leaves neighborhood without a grocery store

BUFFALO, N.Y. (AP) — Tops Friendly Market was more than a place to buy groceries. As the only supermarket for miles, it became a sort of community hub on Buffalo's East Side — where you chatted with neighbors and caught up on people's lives. “It’s where we go to buy bread and...

Lawsuit: Students taunted Black student, threatened lynching

Administrators at a Missouri school district that is the subject of a federal civil rights investigation failed to protect a Black teen from repeated racial taunts that culminated with him being threatened with a lynching, a lawsuit alleges. The suit filed this month in state court...

ENTERTAINMENT

Wesley Morgan wins Colby award for 'The Hardest Place'

NEW YORK (AP) — Author and journalist Wesley Morgan is this year's winner of the William E. Colby Award for military and intelligence writing. He was cited for his book “The Hardest Place: The American Military Adrift in Afghanistan’s Pech Valley." The Colby award, a ,000...

Review: Actress Selma Blair bares soul in captivating memoir

"Mean Baby: A Memoir of Growing Up,” by Selma Blair (Alfred A. Knopf) Most people probably know Selma Blair from her memorable roles in late ‘90s/early '00’s hit films such as “Cruel Intentions," “Legally Blonde” and “Hellboy.” Perhaps others are familiar...

ABC tries something brave: drama with journalist as hero

ABC is bringing actress Hilary Swank and the writer of the 2015 Oscar-winning film “Spotlight” together for a new drama about a journalist working in Alaska. The Thursday series “Alaska” headlines a fall schedule announced Tuesday that also includes an hourlong celebrity...

U.S. & WORLD NEWS

Analysis: Condolence calls from elite show UAE ruler's power

DUBAI, United Arab Emirates (AP) — Coming from around the globe, airplanes carrying world leaders have landed in...

UN floats plan to boost renewables as climate worries mount

GENEVA (AP) — The United Nations chief on Wednesday launched a five-point plan to jump-start broader use of...

Will Turkey upend NATO expansion? US officials seek clarity

WASHINGTON (AP) — With Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan taking an increasingly tough line against the NATO...

Clashes break out in Tripoli, drive rival Libyan PM away

CAIRO (AP) — An attempt by one of Libya’s rival prime ministers to seat his government in the capital of...

Live updates | Russia: 1000 Ukrainian soldiers left Azovstal

KYIV — The Russian military says that almost 1,000 Ukrainian troops left Mariupol's last stronghold this week....

Watchdog: US troop pullout was key factor in Afghan collapse

WASHINGTON (AP) — A government watchdog says decisions by Presidents Donald Trump and Joe Biden to pull all U.S....

Yes supporters await result of Irish same sex marriage vote
Shawn Pogatchnik, Associated Press

DUBLIN (AP) — Gay couples of Ireland woke up Sunday in what felt like a nation reborn, with dreams of wedding plans dancing in their heads.

This new reality was sinking in after the Irish people voted with a surprisingly strong 62 percent "yes" to enshrine the right to gay marriage in the country's conservative 1937 constitution. Thousands of revelers of all sexual identities celebrated until dawn after the result was announced Saturday night.

The Justice Department confirmed Sunday it plans to draft a marriage bill this week that will permit those taking vows in civil ceremonies to choose either to be "husband and wife" or "spouses of each other." It will ensure that no church is required to perform a gay marriage, a key demand of the dominant Catholic Church and also the main Protestant and Muslim communities in Ireland.

Deputy Prime Minister Joan Burton said she expects the bill to become law by early July. Because existing law requires a minimum three-month notice for any civil marriages, the first gay weddings cannot happen until the fall.

For Sen. Katherine Zappone and Ann Louise Gilligan, their day has nearly come. Since 2003 they have fought for legal recognition of their Canadian marriage, suffering setbacks and delays as they sued the state all the way to the Supreme Court.

"For so long, I've been having to dig in my heels and say ... Well, we ARE married. I'm a married woman!" said Zappone, a Seattle native who settled with her Irish spouse in Dublin three decades ago.

"We are now entering a new Ireland," said Gilligan, a former nun.

Zappone and Gilligan thrilled a crowd of thousands of rainbow flag-waving revelers Saturday at the results center at Dublin Castle with a playful promise to renew their vows. Zappone dramatically broke off from a live TV interview, stared directly into the camera, and asked Gilligan to marry her all over again.

"I said yes to Katherine 12 years ago at our marriage in Canada," Gilligan, nearby, shouted to the crowd. "And now we are bringing the 'yes' back home to Ireland, our country of Ireland! Yes, yes, yes!"

In a more sober mood Sunday, the couple reflected on their long road to social acceptance and the remaining wait to get officially hitched in Ireland, before Christmas they hope.

"It took us hours to get a taxi (Saturday night) because so many people came up to us in tears, wanting to talk to us. They now felt so much freer, and proud," said Zappone, who became Ireland's first openly lesbian lawmaker when Prime Minister Enda Kenny appointed her to the Senate in 2011.

"There aren't that many moments in life where you are surrounded with an exuberance of joy. These are rare moments," said Gilligan, a former Loreto nun who left the order in her mid-20s to pursue social justice as a lay Catholic. She wasn't sure about her sexuality until Zappone entered their first theology class together at Boston College in 1981.

"The door opened, and this gorgeous woman came in. I didn't know I was lesbian. I'm a late learner," Gilligan recalled with a laugh. "I fell in love with Katherine, and I went for it. I simply adored her, and I wanted to be with her forever and ever, and here we are!"

They married in Vancouver and sued Ireland for legal recognition, but in 2006 the High Court ruled that Irish law — while never explicit in defining marriage as solely between a man and woman — universally understood this to be the case. The Supreme Court kicked their appeal back to the High Court in 2012.

Months later Gilligan, who is in her late 60s, was hospitalized with a brain hemorrhage. Zappone, yet again, faced bureaucratic presumptions when trying to see her wife, since hospital admissions didn't recognize her as a spouse or other family member. She could have lied and said they had an Irish-recognized civil partnership, a weaker form of marriage-style contract enacted into Irish law in 2010, but Zappone insisted on stating uncomfortable reality: "I am married to her, and you have to recognize that," she recalled.

The medical staff understood and, after Zappone had spent five weeks at Gilligan's bedside, a doctor wrote them a long note of appreciation, wishing he had what they had.

What they still won't have, for many months to come, is an Irish-recognized marriage.

The family section of Ireland's constitution eventually will read, "Marriage may be contracted in accordance with law by two persons without distinction as to their sex." First, parliament must pass the same-sex marriage bill. Analysts expect easy passage, since all parties support the measure. Then Ireland's ceremonial head of state, President Michael D. Higgins, will sign the bill into law and amend the constitution.

"Technically and legally we'll probably have to wait until towards the end of the year," Zappone said. "Then we'll head towards the big day."

Copyright 2015 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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