06-02-2020  9:14 pm   •   PDX and SEA Weather
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NORTHWEST NEWS

Portland, Oregon, Remains Largely Peaceful, Curfew Lifted

Portland will not impose a curfew on Tuesday night for the first time in four days

Inslee Orders Statewide Guard Activation Following Unrest

Inslee had previously authorized 400 troops for Seattle and 200 troops for Bellevue.

Mayor Ted Wheeler Asks Governor to Call Up National Guard

Portland police chief said, “It has been a long, difficult and emotional several days in Portland and across the country and we understand why.”

Governor Brown Announces $30 Million Investment to Protect Agricultural Workers

The funds are intended to secure Oregon's food supply chain and support agricultural workers during the COVID-19 health crisis

NEWS BRIEFS

Oregon Health Authority Investigating COVID-19 Increase at Unnamed Business

Oregon reports 71 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases today, no new deaths ...

Some Columbia River Gorge Trails, Parks Reopen Today

Crowded sites including most waterfall viewing areas, campgrounds, and visitor’s centers will stay closed because of the coronavirus...

Over 60 Percent of U.S. Households Have Responded to 2020 Census

Washington is one of the 6 states with the highest self-response rates and both Seattle and Portland are one of the top 8 cities with...

Federal Court Rules Florida Law That Undermined Voting Rights Restoration Is Unconstitutional

The law required people with past convictions to pay all outstanding legal fees, costs, fines, and restitution before regaining their...

Seattle mayor, police chief vow to review protest tactics

SEATTLE (AP) — Seattle's mayor and police chief promised a large crowd of protesters Tuesday to review the department's use of pepper spray and flash-bang grenades to break up a crowd of peaceful protesters the night before, encouraging them to keep marching as long as they do not do...

The Latest: Thousands on New York City streets after curfew

The Latest on the May 25 death in Minneapolis of George Floyd, a handcuffed black man who pleaded for air as a white police officer pressed a knee on his neck:TOP OF THE HOUR:— Thousands of protesters on New York City streets after curfew.— Protest in Washington on Tuesday lacking...

Kansas, Missouri renew Border War with 4-game football set

KANSAS CITY, Mo. (AP) — Kansas and Missouri are resuming their bitter Border War in football after the former Big 12 rivals agreed to a four-game series in which each school will play two home games beginning in September 2025.The fourth-longest rivalry in college football dates to 1891, but...

OPINION

Mayor Ted Wheeler: Portland and the Path Forward

Portland Mayor Ted Wheeler invites Portlanders, as public servants, to join him "in insisting that we never return to business as usual." ...

Local Business Leaders Share Messages of Hope

President, CEO of SAIF says each of us must move forward in "our understanding of the problem, in holding ourselves accountable for our own attitudes and biases, and in coming together, not apart." ...

Time to Stop Messing Around and Strike at the Root of Police Violence

Thomas Knapp says the root of police violence is the creation of "police forces" as state institutions separate from the populace and dedicated to suppressing that populace on command ...

A Letter to George Floyd: (Posthumous)

As Black mothers, so often we say, our Black boys across this nation belong to all of us. ...

AFRICAN AMERICANS IN THE NEWS

The Latest: Thousands on New York City streets after curfew

The Latest on the May 25 death in Minneapolis of George Floyd, a handcuffed black man who pleaded for air as a white police officer pressed a knee on his neck:TOP OF THE HOUR:— Thousands of protesters on New York City streets after curfew.— Protest in Washington on Tuesday lacking...

Zuckerberg still under fire over inflammatory Trump posts

OAKLAND, Calif. (AP) — Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg isn’t budging over his refusal to take action on inflammatory posts by President Donald Trump that spread misinformation about voting by mail and, many said, encouraged violence against protesters. His critics, however, are...

Minneapolis police face civil rights probe over Floyd death

MINNEAPOLIS (AP) — The state of Minnesota on Tuesday launched a civil rights investigation of the Minneapolis Police Department in hopes of forcing widespread changes following the death of George Floyd, a black man who died after a white officer pressed his knee into Floyd’s neck for...

ENTERTAINMENT

Trump as thug or hero? Depends on what network you watch

NEW YORK (AP) — It was a split screen for the ages on MSNBC Monday: on the left side, President Donald Trump talking about restoring law and order. On the right, a tear-gassed young woman vomiting in a Washington street.For a nation rubbed raw following a traumatic weekend, cable television...

Books on race and criminal justice top bestseller lists

NEW YORK (AP) — As nationwide protests against racism and police violence continue, readers are seeking out books old and new on race and criminal justice. Robin Diangelo's “White Fragility," Michelle Alexander's "The New Jim Crow" and Bryan Stevenson's “Just Mercy” were...

'Just Mercy,' drama of racial injustice, to be free in June

NEW YORK (AP) — The 2019 film “Just Mercy,” which chronicles courtroom struggles against racial injustice and mass incarceration, will be made free on digital platforms throughout June in the wake of George Floyd's death, Warner Bros. said Tuesday. In the film, Michael B....

U.S. & WORLD NEWS

Zuckerberg still under fire over inflammatory Trump posts

OAKLAND, Calif. (AP) — Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg isn’t budging over his refusal to take action on...

Tropical Storm Cristobal forms, flood threat for Mexico

MEXICO CITY (AP) — Tropical Storm Cristobal formed in the southern Gulf of Mexico on Tuesday, bringing some...

Washington man has some surprise guests: about 60 protesters

WASHINGTON (AP) — Rahul Dubey had some unexpected guests Monday night — about 60 in all — as...

Afghan official: Kabul mosque bombed, 2 dead, 2 wounded

KABUL, Afghanistan (AP) — A bomb exploded inside a mosque in the Afghan capital Kabul on Tuesday killing...

Virus-tracking app angers thousands in Moscow with fines

MOSCOW (AP) — When nurse Maria Alexeyeva caught coronavirus at work, she isolated herself at home and...

Putin signs Russia's nuclear deterrent policy

MOSCOW (AP) — President Vladimir Putin on Tuesday endorsed Russia's nuclear deterrent policy which allows...

McMenamins
chinese children
By Feng Ke and Katie Hunt CNN



Twenty-year-old Li Xue has a passion for learning but has never spent a day at school.

The only way she could study was by borrowing books with her elder sister's library card and begging her for lessons.

As a second child born under the strictures of China's one-child policy, she says was not entitled to a state education.

Nor did she have access to subsidized healthcare that most city dwellers enjoy and used her mother's and sister's identity cards to buy medicine when she fell ill.

"She kept asking me why she can't go to school, why she can't while all others do, and I had no idea how to respond her except repeating that she is a second child," her mother Bai Xiuling, a former factory worker, told CNN from her modest bare-brick home.

Li says she was not jealous of her 28-year-old sister, but grateful because she tutored her in her spare time.

"I want to learn as much as she does but it's different because she can go to school and I cannot."

Her mother fell unexpectedly pregnant in 1993. Despite the risks, she went ahead with the pregnancy. A childhood bout of polio damaged her leg and she wanted to have another child to take care of her in old age.

China's family planning laws require most families living in urban areas to have one child. The policy is looser in rural areas and can also be skirted by those who can afford to pay the eye-watering fines.

But Li's parents could not pay the 5,000 yuan ($820) penalty and authorities denied Li her household registration documents, or "hukou," which entitle city residents to subsidized health, housing and education.

Reform?

The one-child policy, though applauded by many for slowing down China's population growth, has been widely criticized for resulting in forced abortions and hefty fines that are sometimes used to enforce it.

Some critics say the law hurts China's elderly, who typically rely on their children for support in old age, and even constrains economic growth as the working age population begins to decline.

In August, Xinhua, China's state news agency, said China was deliberating relaxing the policy to allow couples, where one parent is an only child, to have two children. Currently, both parents must be sole children to be eligible for a second child.

The government is also debating a two-child policy after 2015, according to state media.

"We are optimistic that an end to the one-child policy will soon be confirmed," economists Ting Lu and Xiaojia Zhi wrote in an August report for investment house Bank of America Merrill Lynch.

They said that reform of the three-decade old policy could happen after a key four-day gathering of China's top leaders -- the Communist Party's third plenum -- which began on Saturday.

But even if the policy is eased, it is unlikely to make life easier for Liand others like her.

Her family have campaigned relentlessly for her to have the "hukou" documents they believe she is entitled to in order to live a normal life.

They have petitioned local and national authorities and are pursuing their case through the legal system, but, so far, to no avail.

Instead, her mother and father said they have been beaten and harassed by the local police.

"Li Xue's father and I were beaten brutally in 2001. I couldn't get out of bed for almost two months, and her sister had to take care of me," said Bai.

Local police declined to comment when contacted by CNN.

'Never give up'

In September, the family received notice that their case would be heard by the Beijing High People's Court but they are not optimistic that the case will be resolved in their favor.

A spokesperson for the court told CNN that the case is now being examined and an announcement will be made in due course. There were two possible outcomes; either the case would be retried or the original verdict affirmed, the spokesperson said.

"The only thing we want is an explanation of why our daughter has no "hukou", and no more," said Li's father Li Hongyu.

In 2011, Li started a microblog on Weibo, China's equivalent of Twitter. She hopes her online presence will help draw attention to her plight, and she wants to use the platform to initiate more positive change for people in her position.

When asked what she would major in if she had a chance to go to university, Li says she would like to become a lawyer.

"I do enjoy studying law and hope I could use this to help other people, but right now, I have to be practical and solve my most urgent problem -- becoming a legal second child," she said.

"Sometimes I doubt whether what I do will change anything, but I think I'll carry on," she said, echoing the name of her blog -- Little Xue never give up.

Katie Hunt wrote and reported from Hong Kong

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