05-18-2021  12:54 am   •   PDX and SEA Weather
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NORTHWEST NEWS

Portland Police, FBI Respond to Threats of Gun Violence

Citing intelligence that there are “imminent” efforts from outside groups to “engage and advance gun violence” this weekend, the Portland City Council announced police and the FBI will be on the streets of the city for the next few days

Gov.: Mask Requirement Lifted for Fully Vaccinated in Oregon

Oregon Gov. Kate Brown has announced that the state will immediately follow guidance from the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Jay Inslee: State on Track to Fully Reopen June 30

Washington is on track to fully reopen its economy by June 30, and a full reopening could happen even sooner if 70% or more of residents ages 16 and older have gotten at least one dose of vaccine by then.

Inslee: Open Carry of Weapons Now Prohibited at Rallies, Capitol

Last week the Oregon Legislature passed a measure that bans guns from the state Capitol.

NEWS BRIEFS

The Skanner To Be Honored With Lifetime Achievement Award

The Daily Journal of Commerce and its Building Diversity program is honoring The Skanner on May 26 for its pivotal role in many...

OHS Looks Back to "Guatemalan Immigration: Indigenous Transborder Communities"

In the 1980s, people from Guatemala, seeking refuge from violence and harsh economic and social inequities, began building sister...

Vancouver Principal Resigns Amid Racist Language Accusations

Johnson had led Mountain View High School since 2014 but had been on paid administrative leave almost two months. ...

Oregon Cares Fund Resumes Disbursement of Funds to Black Community

Funds started being released again last week ...

Audit: Portland Skipped Safeguards to Get Virus Grants Out

The audit found that race was given priority, but women were not prioritized, and it was not documented how various factors weighed in...

Oregon Senate votes to reinstate foreclosure moratorium

SALEM, Ore. (AP) — A bill that would reinstate Oregon's moratorium on foreclosures for those experiencing financial hardship during the coronavirus pandemic passed the state Senate on Monday. The bill, which would allow homeowners to put their mortgage in forbearance at least...

Police seek suspects in possible bias crime assault

PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) — The Multnomah County Sheriff’s Office is seeking the public’s help to identify people involved in an assault east of Portland at Glenn Otto Park near the Sandy River. At about 7:36 p.m., deputies responded to a report of an assault in Troutdale and...

OPINION

COMMENTARY: America’s Policing and Political Practices Inextricably Linked to KKK and White Supremacy

Several scholars told the Black Press that the United States, its police forces, and politicians now face a solemn question, “from the Klan to White supremacy, where does America go from here?” ...

OP-ED: The Supreme Court Can Protect Black Lives by Ending Qualified Immunity

The three officers responsible for the murder of Breonna Taylor are not the first to walk free after killing an unarmed Black person, and unfortunately, especially if things continue as they are, they will not be the last. ...

LETTER TO THE EDITOR: Trade Arron Rodgers

Give Aaron Rodgers a break, Green Bay. Just like Bart Starr & Brett Favre, Aaron Rodgers has been a Hall of Fame quarterback for the Packers for 16 years. ...

Editorial From the Publisher - Council: Police Reform Needed Now

Through years of ceaseless protest, activists have tried to hold Portland Police to account. ...

AFRICAN AMERICANS IN THE NEWS

Arizona sheriff's immigration patrols to cost public 0M

PHOENIX (AP) — The costs to taxpayers from a racial profiling lawsuit stemming from former Sheriff Joe Arpaio’s immigration patrols in metro Phoenix a decade ago are expected to reach 2 million by summer 2022. Officials approved a tentative county budget Monday that...

Suit: Georgia election law threatens voting, speech rights

ATLANTA (AP) — Georgia’s sweeping new overhaul of election laws threatens the fundamental right to vote, freedom of speech and the separation of powers, according to a federal lawsuit filed Monday. The lawsuit against the secretary of state and the members of the State...

At Athens Varsity, answer to 'What’ll ya have?' is bulldozer

ATHENS, Ga. (AP) — Chili dogs, onion rings and frosted orange milkshakes could soon be in shorter supply for students at the University of Georgia. The Athens Banner-Herald reports The Varsity has applied for permission to tear down its decades-old...

ENTERTAINMENT

New this week: Chrissie Hynde, loads of zombies & M.O.D.O.K

Here’s a collection curated by The Associated Press’ entertainment journalists of what’s arriving on TV, streaming services and music platforms this week. MOVIES — In “The Dry,” Eric Bana returns to his native country for a taut, tense thriller...

Celebrity birthdays for the week of May 23-29

Celebrity birthdays for the week of May 23-29: May 23: Actor Barbara Barrie is 90. Actor Joan Collins is 88. Actor Charles Kimbrough (“Murphy Brown”) is 85. Actor Lauren Chapin (“Father Knows Best”) is 76. Country singer Judy Rodman is 70. Comedian Drew Carey is 63....

Poet Carl Phillips wins ,000 Jackson Prize

NEW YORK (AP) — Poet Carl Phillips has received a ,000 honor for a body of work which displays “exceptional talent.” On Monday, Poets & Writers announced that the 61-year-old Phillips has won the Jackson Prize, which in previous years has gone to Elizabeth...

U.S. & WORLD NEWS

Giuliani lawyers: Feds treat him like drug boss or terrorist

NEW YORK (AP) — Attorneys for Rudy Giuliani say a covert warrant that prosecutors obtained for his Apple iCloud...

Gaetz associate pleads guilty to sex trafficking charges

ORLANDO, Fla. (AP) — A Florida politician who emerged as a central figure in the Justice Department’s sex...

US report: Allies of El Salvador's president deemed corrupt

MIAMI (AP) — Allies of Salvadoran President Nayib Bukele, including his Cabinet chief, have been included in a...

Hong Kong's new bishop wants differing views respected

HONG KONG (AP) — Hong Kong’s incoming Roman Catholic bishop Stephen Chow called for respect for different...

Ransomware hits AXA units in Asia, hurts Ireland healthcare

PARIS (AP) — Cybercriminals have hit four Asian subsidiaries of the Paris-based insurance company AXA with a...

Bangladesh arrests journalist known for unearthing graft

DHAKA, Bangladesh (AP) — Police in Bangladesh's capital have arrested a journalist known for her strong...

The Skanner It's Easy
CNN

Protest in TurkeyTurkish authorities' use of live ammunition, tear gas, beatings and sexual assaults to crush street protests earlier this year constitute "human rights violations on a massive scale," according to a report by human rights watchdog Amnesty International.

Amnesty documented cases of Turkish riot police firing plastic bullets and tear gas canisters at the heads of protesters. It also accused police of sexually abusing female demonstrators and of severely beating and shooting protesters with live ammunition, resulting in the deaths of two men in separate incidents.

The report, released Wednesday, focused on the turmoil that erupted in May and June, when police tried to put down an environmentalist sit-in. Demonstrators had staged an Occupy Wall Street-style protest over government plans to demolish Istanbul's Gezi Park and replace it with a shopping mall.

"The levels of violence used by police in the course of Gezi Park protests clearly show what happens when poorly trained, poorly supervised police officers are instructed to use force -- and encouraged to use it unsparingly -- safe in the knowledge that they are unlikely ever to be identified or prosecuted for their abuses," said Amnesty International's Turkey expert, Andrew Gardner.

The Turkish government has launched an investigation into the possible excess use of force. At least one police officer from a counter-terrorism unit is standing trial along with other suspects for beating a protester named Ali Ismail Korkmaz in the Turkish city of Eskisehir. The 19-year-old university student later died as a result of his injuries.

Government announces democratic reforms

Amnesty International's report emerged two days after the Turkish government unveiled a long-awaited series of reforms, which the rights group said fails "to address these violations or to take any serious steps to ensure that they will not occur in the future."

Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan applauded what he called the "democratization package," declaring it a historic moment for the country.

The legislation lifts the ban on women wearing Islamic headscarves in public institutions. However, women serving as police officers, judges or military personnel are still not allowed to wear headscarves.

The reforms also removed the ban on teaching the Kurdish language, and ended the ban of the Kurdish letters "q," "x" and "w," which do not exist in the Turkish alphabet. However, Kurdish can only be taught in private schools, even though it is the language spoken by Turkey's largest ethnic minority.

Another change called for expanding the definition and punishment for hate crimes committed on the basis of ethnicity or religious belief.

The democratization package quickly inspired a chorus of criticism from a wide range of ethnic, religious and political groups.

"This is more of an election package," said Sebahat Tuncel, a lawmaker from the main Kurdish opposition party, referring to municipal elections expected to be held in 2014.

"This package could have lifted the obstacles to democratization. It could have lifted barriers to freedom of the press, to freedom of expression and amended the anti-terror laws," Tuncel added.

Thousands of Kurds have been arrested in recent years, accused of collaborating with the Kurdistan Workers Party (PKK), whose militants have been fighting a guerrilla war for the past 30 years against the Turkish state.

Erdogan's government has tried to bring an end to the simmering conflict by launching negotiations with jailed PKK leader Abdullah Ocalan. The peace talks have prompted some of the PKK's thousands of fighters to voluntarily leave Turkey for neighboring Iraq.

Meanwhile, women's groups and lesbian, gay, bisexual and transsexual activists are upset that the reforms did not include reference to hate crimes committed on the basis of gender or sexual orientation.

Though Erdogan offered to create a cultural institute for Turkey's Roma minority and promised to return a government-seized monastery to the Assyrian Christians, he stopped short of reopening the Halki Seminary, which traditionally educated the country's top Greek Orthodox clergy.

For decades, members of Turkey's dwindling Greek community, as well as many Western governments, have called for Turkey to lift its ban on Halki.

"I think it is a step forward and the government says more will come," wrote Suat Kinklioglu, a former lawmaker from Erdogan's ruling Justice and Development Party (AKP), in an e-mail to CNN.

"However, the real issue in Turkey is political and cultural polarization. I wish the package would address issues such as freedom of expression and pluralism."

Turkish president calls for reform

Turkey's president warned about the threats this polarization posed in an address before the Turkish parliament Tuesday.

"I viewed the peaceful demonstrations of the young people at Gezi Park... as a new manifestation of our democratic maturity," said Abdullah Gul.

Gul argued that Turkey still had a long way to go in its democratization process.

"The effective and efficient operation of executive, legislative and judicial powers; the existence of a serious, constructive and strong opposition; a free, critical, impartial and independent media are of utmost importance for a country's democratic development," he said in his speech to lawmakers.

Gul has been a loyal ally of Erdogan through the prime minister's decade in office.

But as his term in the largely symbolic post of president draws to a close, Gul has increasingly challenged some of Erdogan's more controversial policies.

The increasingly divergent political positions have prompted widespread speculation that Gul may be preparing to submit himself as a candidate to be the next prime minister of Turkey.

 

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