07-02-2020  12:33 pm   •   PDX and SEA Weather
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NORTHWEST NEWS

Police Union Contract Extended, Bargaining to Continue

Negotiations will resume in January 2021.

Inslee Heckled Off Stage During Tri-Cities Appearance

Speaking outdoors in Eastern Washington, the governor was repeatedly interrupted by hecklers as he urged residents to wear masks to prevent the spread of the coronavirus.

Portland Police Declare Riot, Use Tear Gas

Several arrests were made as protests continued into early Wednesday morning.

Oregon Legislature Passes Police Reform Package Amid ‘Rushed’ Criticism

Six new bills declare an emergency in police protocol and are immediately effective. 

NEWS BRIEFS

Trump Blows His Twitter Dog Whistle on America’s Fair Housing Policies in the Suburbs

The president could be Tweeting on unemployment or COVID-19 infections but instead pushes housing discrimination ...

Zeta Phi Beta Sorority Awards Historic $100,000 Founders' Centennial Scholarship

Zeta celebrates 100 years with largest single recipient scholarship awarded by a historically Black Greek-lettered sorority or...

Nominations Being Accepted for the Gladys McCoy Lifetime Achievement Award

Gladys McCoy Lifetime Achievement Award was established in 1994 to honor Multnomah County residents who have contributed outstanding...

Shatter, LLC Launches to Elevate Diverse Voices in Progressive Politics

A collaboration of leading female political strategists aims to fill a void in the world of political consulting ...

New Director Takes Helm at Oregon Black Pioneers

In its 27-year history, the organization has never had an executive director, and has expressed confidence and optimism in Zachary A....

More arrests early Thursday after police clear protest zone

SEATTLE (AP) — Seattle police say they arrested more than two dozen people early Thursday who gathered in an area officers cleared hours earlier after the mayor ordered an end to the city’s “occupied” protest zone.In a statement police said they used pepper spray and...

US sets deadline for wolverines protection decision

BILLINGS, Mont. (AP) — U.S. wildlife officials have agreed to decide by the end of August whether climate change and other threats are pushing the rare wolverine closer to extinction in the mountains of the West.Government attorneys and conservation groups that had sued to force a decision...

Iowa defensive back Jack Koerner hurt in jet ski accident

IOWA CITY, Iowa (AP) — Iowa defensive back Jack Koerner sustained serious injuries when he and a passenger on a jet ski collided with a boat on the Lake of the Ozarks in Missouri.According to a police report, Koerner and Cole Coffin were hurt at about 6:30 p.m. Friday when their watercraft...

Missouri football program pushes again for racial justice

COLUMBIA, Mo. (AP) — Ryan Walters had just arrived at the University of Missouri to coach safeties for the football program when a series of protests related to racial injustice led to the resignations of the system president and the chancellor of its flagship campus.The student-led movement...

OPINION

Editorial From the Publisher: Vote as Your Life Depends on It

The Republican-controlled Senate won’t pass the George Floyd Justice in Policing Act, no matter how hard Oregon’s senators and others work to push for change. ...

Banana Republic or Constitutional Democracy? The US Military May Decide

Will the military, when and if the chips are down, acts in accord with the Constitution and not out of loyalty to its commander-in-chief? ...

To Save Black Lives, and the Soul of Our Nation, Congress Must Act Boldly

For too long, Black people in America have been burdened with the unjust responsibility of keeping ourselves safe from police. ...

Racial Inequalities - Black America Has Solutions; White America Won't Approve Them

The problem is we have to secure approval of the solutions from the people who deny the problem's existence while reaping the benefits from it. ...

AFRICAN AMERICANS IN THE NEWS

Cleared in shooting, Iowa officer fired for letting woman go

IOWA CITY, Iowa (AP) — As protests over the death of George Floyd grew in Iowa’s second largest city, activists demanded the firing of a white officer who shot and paralyzed an unarmed Black man during a 2016 traffic stop.On June 18, Cedar Rapids Police Chief Wayne Jerman seemed to...

3 cities pilot South Africa-style truth, reconciliation push

BOSTON (AP) — District attorneys in Boston, Philadelphia and San Francisco are teaming up on a pilot effort patterned after South Africa's post-apartheid truth and reconciliation commission to confront racism in the criminal justice system.Suffolk County DA Rachael Rollins, Philadelphia DA...

Robert E. Lee statue becomes epicenter of protest movement

RICHMOND, Va. (AP) — Just a little over a month ago, the area around Richmond's iconic statue of Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee was as quiet and sedate as the statue itself. But since the May 25 police killing of George Floyd in Minneapolis, the area has been transformed into a bustling hub...

ENTERTAINMENT

Actor says 'Justice League' director Whedon was 'abusive'

LOS ANGELES (AP) — Actor Ray Fisher says director Joss Whedon's behavior was “abusive” on the set of the 2017 film “Justice League.”“Joss Wheadon’s on-set treatment of the cast and crew of Justice League was gross, abusive, unprofessional, and...

Review: Joe Ely serves up songs of honesty, hope and healing

Joe Ely, "Love In the Midst of Mayhem” (Rack 'Em Records)Joe Ely's leftovers are keepers, as “Love In the Midst of Mayhem” shows. Idled by the coronavirus — the “pandamnit,” as Ely calls it — the West Texas troubadour began digging through his...

Eastwood's ankle forced production shift for 'The Outpost'

LONDON (AP) — An accident requiring two screws in his ankle nearly prevented Scott Eastwood from portraying a real life soldier in Afghanistan in “The Outpost” — a role that required a level of athleticism. Eastwood was tight-lipped about how he was injured, but he said...

U.S. & WORLD NEWS

Not so random acts: Science finds that being kind pays off

Acts of kindness may not be that random after all. Science says being kind pays off.Research shows that acts of...

Coronavirus concerns freeze Vanilla Ice show

AUSTIN, Texas (AP) — Vanilla Ice has indefinitely postponed a Texas concert that drew fierce criticism due...

Hugh Downs, genial presence on TV news and game shows, dies

NEW YORK (AP) — Hugh Downs, the genial, versatile broadcaster who became one of television’s most...

Finnish Air Force Command drops swastika logo as insignia

HELSINKI (AP) — Finland's Air Force Command has discreetly dropped a swastika logo from its unit emblem...

Photo of toddler sitting on slain grandpa angers Kashmiris

SRINAGAR, India (AP) — A photo of a toddler sitting on the chest of of his dead grandfather has outraged...

Bolivia tries to hold elections amid pandemic, risking chaos

LA PAZ, Bolivia (AP) — Deserted during months of quarantine, the streets of Bolivia are roiling again with...

McMenamins
By Jake Tapper CNN




The Office of the Director of National Intelligence has released approximately 1,800 pages of documents that shed more light on the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court.

The documents indicate that the National Security Agency violated its own internal guidelines relating to phone numbers it can "query" from among records the agency collects.

Moreover, the documents indicate that the NSA presented false information to the surveillance court about the violation.

"The people responsible for authoring the report did not fully understand how the operation was working," a senior intelligence official said. "That misrepresentation resulted in a factually inaccurate report."

The documents satisfy a judge's order pertaining to public records requests from the American Civil Liberties Union and the Electronic Frontier Foundation, a privacy advocacy group, about FISA Court interpretations of the section of the Patriot Act dealing with collecting metadata, the so-called business records provision.

The metadata program started in 2006 and allowed the NSA to seek to obtain more information about a number if there was "reasonable articulable suspicion" that the number was linked to terrorism.

The NSA also kept a separate "alert list" that was used to compare the new numbers that were coming in daily and consider whether new numbers should be added to the category of those with "reasonable articulable suspicion."

The alert list started with about 4,000 numbers and ended up with 17,835, most of which did not have the required suspicion, officials say.

The court ruled that the NSA was allowed to have the alert list, but the agency could not run it against the larger database because it did not have the reasonable suspicion.

Every day, phone companies sent metadata, which went into an archive. But each day, the NSA ran the alert list against the new information to see if it could establish reasonable suspicion. This went on from May 2006 until January 2009.

"To further complicate matters," an official said, "reporting to the court, we described the alert list but did not describe (it) accurately."

Senior intelligence officials attempted to assure reporters that the news was not so much the compliance violation, but the fact that the NSA uncovered the problem, reported it to the Justice Department and the FISA Court, "took steps thereafter to do a thorough scrub of operations," and reported back to the FISA Court after the changes had been made.

In one declassified order from March 2009, Judge Reggie Walton said the court would "not permit the government to access the data collected until such time as the government is able to restore the court's confidence that the government can and will comply with previously approved procedures for accessing such data."

A senior intelligence official noted "fairly strong language" by the court, but stressed that it did not find any "intentional attempt" to violate the law or abuse the program.

Because there was such confusion about the program, the NSA instituted new steps to guard against future violations, including adding a compliance director, the officials said.

One official said this proved that there was "effective oversight by the executive branch and the court. NSA is not perfect and screws up from time to time." But there never has been any indication that these programs have been abused by spying for improper purposes or exceeding guidelines with improper authority, he said.

The officials said they did not know of any NSA employee who was punished or fired as a result of the problem.

Director of National Intelligence James Clapper said in a statement that the incidents were promptly reported to the court, which ordered NSA to seek its approval to query metadata on a case-by-case basis, except when lives were under imminent threat.

"The documents released today are a testament to the government's strong commitment to detecting, correcting, and reporting mistakes that occur in implementing technologically complex intelligence collection activities, and to continually improving its oversight and compliance processes," he said.

The American Civil Liberties Union said the documents confirm that the agency "cannot be trusted" with such sweeping powers and that the "secret and one-sided" judicial review is not an adequate check.

"The abuses revealed in these documents are alarming but also predictable. These violations are the inevitable result of allowing the NSA to assemble a vast database of sensitive information about every American," Alex Abdo, staff attorney with the ACLU National Security Project, said in a statement.

The civil liberties group has challenged the constitutionality of the NSA phone records collection program in court.

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