10-15-2019  2:41 pm   •   PDX Weather    •   SEA weather  
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NORTHWEST NEWS

Hank Willis Thomas Exhibit Opens at Portland Art Museum

One of the most important conceptual artists of our time, his works examine the representation of race and the politics of visual culture

Grocery Workers Union Ratifies Contract with Stores

The United Food and Commercial Workers Union has agreed a three-year contract for stores in Oregon and Southwest Washington

PCC Weighing Community Input on Workforce Training Center, Affordable Housing in Cully

Portland Community College is compiling the results of door-to-door and online surveys

Lawsuit Filed Against Hilton Hotels in “Calling His Mother While Black” Discrimination Case

Jermaine Massey was ousted from the DoubleTree Hotel in Portland where he was a guest and forced to find lodging at around midnight

NEWS BRIEFS

Protesters Rally in Ashland to Demand 'Impeach Trump Now'

Activists are rallying in Ashland Sunday Oct, 13 to demand impeachment proceedings ...

Black Women Help Kick off Sustainable Building Week

The event will be held at Portland’s first and only “green building” owned and operated by African-American women ...

Voter Registration Deadline for the November Special Election is Oct. 15 

The Special Election in Multnomah County will be held on Nov. 5, 2019 ...

Franklin High School’s Mercedes Muñoz Named Oregon Teacher of the Year

In a letter of recommendation, Muñoz was referred to as “a force of nurture.” ...

Founder of Black Panther Challenge Creates Brand To Support Mental Health

The launch comes during Mental Health Awareness Week. The creators say they want people around the world to know that they aren’t...

Authorities identify 63-year-old man in hunting accident

LONGVIEW, Wash. (AP) — Oregon county authorities have identified the man killed in a suspected accidental shooting while hunting near Washington state lines.The Longview Daily News reports that Columbia County Sheriff's Office identified 63-year-old Martin Fox of Portland.County deputies,...

Name of man released in Portland suspicious death Monday

PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) — Portland police have released the name of a man who died of a gunshot wound Monday in North Portland.The Oregonian/OregonLive reports Ricky Malone Sr.'s death is being investigated as a homicide.Police say the man was found hurt during a welfare check Monday morning in...

Bryant bounces back to lead Missouri over Mississippi

COLUMBIA, Mo. (AP) — Last week, when he heard a pop in his left knee after being hit low, Missouri quarterback Kelly Bryant briefly saw his college football career pass before his eyes. The injury wasn't as bad as it looked, and Bryant played like his old self in a 38-27 victory over...

Missouri out to stop Ole Miss ground game in SEC matchup

Ole Miss coach Matt Luke has watched every game Missouri has played this season, and he was no doubt excited by the way Wyoming ran wild against the Tigers in their season opener.It should have portended good things for the Rebels' own vaunted rushing attack.But the more Luke looked at the video,...

OPINION

“Hell No!” That Is My Message to Those Who Would Divide Us 

Upon release from the South African jail, Nelson Mandela told UAW Local 600 members “It is you who have made the United States of America a superpower, a leader of the world" ...

Rep. Janelle Bynum Issues Response to the Latest Statement from Clackamas Town Center

State legislator questions official response after daughter questioned for ‘loitering’ in parking lot ...

Why Would HUD Gut Its Own Disparate Impact Rule?

"You can’t expand housing rights by limiting civil protections. The ’D’ in HUD doesn’t stand for ‘Discrimination’" ...

Despite U.S. Open Loss, Serena Williams Is Still the Greatest of All Time

Serena Williams lost her bid for what would have been her sixth U.S. Open Singles title ...

AFRICAN AMERICANS IN THE NEWS

Chief: Officer's Proud Boys membership didn't break policy

A Connecticut police officer's membership in the Proud Boys, a far-right group known for engaging in violent clashes at political rallies, didn't violate department policies, the town's police chief has concluded in response to a civil rights group's concerns.The East Hampton officer, Kevin P....

President of Bulgarian soccer resigns after fan racism, loss

SOFIA, Bulgaria (AP) — Criticized around Europe for the racist behavior of Bulgarian fans and under pressure from the country's prime minister following a run of poor results, the president of the country's soccer federation resigned on Tuesday.A few hours later, Bulgarian special police...

Money, hatred for the Kurds drives Turkey's Syrian fighters

BEIRUT (AP) — The Syrian fighters vowed to kill "pigs" and "infidels," paraded their Kurdish captives in front of cameras and, in one graphic video, fired several rounds into a man lying on the side of a highway with his hands bound behind his back.They are part of the self-styled Syrian...

ENTERTAINMENT

Only 3 returning big network shows see rise in live viewers

NEW YORK (AP) — ABC's sophomore drama "A Million Little Things," reality show "Shark Tank" and the Fox first-responders drama "9-1-1" have something in common that they can take pride in.Over the first three weeks of the television season, they are the only three of 49 prime-time shows...

AP Exclusive: Julie Andrews reflects on her Hollywood years

LOS ANGELES (AP) — Everyone is on their best behavior when Julie Andrews is around.It's early June in Los Angeles and Andrews is coming to film segments for a night of guest programming on Turner Classic Movies and speak about her new book, "Home Work: A Memoir of My Hollywood Years," which...

Gina Rodriguez apologizes for singing N-word lyric

NEW YORK (AP) — Gina Rodriguez has apologized for singing along on her Instagram story to a Fugees verse that includes the N-word.The "Jane the Virgin" actress deleted the short video she posted Tuesday and replaced it with her apology, but not before memes and other backlash ensued....

U.S. & WORLD NEWS

Mexico: Families of slain police angry, AMLO defends policy

MORELIA, Mexico (AP) — Grieving family members of the 13 police officers killed in an apparent cartel...

LeBron James no longer King James for Hong Kong protesters

HONG KONG (AP) — When the ball smashed into a photo of LeBron James' face stuck above the hoop and dropped...

12 Democrats meet for first debate since impeachment inquiry

WESTERVILLE, Ohio (AP) — Joe Biden is facing baseless but persistent allegations of wrongdoing overseas...

Haiti president breaks silence, says will not resign

PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti (AP) — President Jovenel Moïse broke his silence Tuesday and said it would be...

The Latest: Putin and Erdogan discuss situation in Syria

CEYLANPINAR, Turkey (AP) — The latest on Turkey's offensive in northern Syria (all times local):11:55...

Trump's sanctions won't bite a vulnerable Turkish economy

FRANKFURT, Germany (AP) — The sanctions the U.S. announced against Turkey this week over its offensive in...

McMenamins
Blake Ellis CNN Money

NEW YORK (CNNMoney) -- Revelations that the National Security Agency can break through web site encryptions and access huge amounts of personal data has raised questions about how safe our day-to-day financial dealings really are.

Many people carry out their entire financial lives online -- doing everything from paying their bills to managing their investments. And while financial institutions have put layers of protections in place to prevent fraud and hacking, security experts say that if the NSA is able to find a way in, other sophisticated cybercriminals could do the same.

But because of the skill, time and money needed to launch such large-scale attacks, getting your bank account drained by a big hacker group like the Syrian Electronic Army or Anonymous is a lot less likely than getting targeted by a small-time fraudster or identity thief, says Credit.com chairman Adam Levin, who specializes in privacy and identity theft.

Even without multi-million dollar encryption-breaking technology, these crooks can pretty easily get the information they need. A hacker can send you an email containing malware that is automatically downloaded as soon as you open it -- giving them access to your computer and all the information on it. Use an unsecured Wi-Fi network in the airport, and your bank account information can be compromised as soon as you log in. Or a scammer claiming to be from your credit card company can call and say there is an emergency with your credit card and ask you to confirm your card number, Social Security number and date of birth.

There goes your identity.

"The capability to get your information is there," said Carl Herberger, president of security solutions at IT security firm Radware. "So it becomes less about who and the motive, but what are you going to do about it."

Instead of retreating from the online financial services world altogether and reverting back to snail mail and cash, there are a number of ways to protect your information. And while you may still be defenseless against some very sophisticated hacks, taking these steps will make it harder for anyone to crack into your financial life.

Create strong passwords: The more unique your password is, the less likely it is to be guessed. Pick passwords with a variety of characters -- include letters, numbers and symbols -- the longer it is, the better, Levin says. And you've heard it before, but don't use "123456" or "password" as a password.

Don't use the same password for multiple websites: This should be a given, but many people still do it because it's so much easier to type in the same password everywhere you go. Problem is, that makes it a lot easier for hackers, too. Also, change your password frequently.

Check your accounts every day: By regularly monitoring your account, you can ensure that you see transactions you don't recognize. Many financial institutions also offer a free service that notifies you every time a transaction is made on your account. The sooner you contact your financial institution about a suspicious transaction, the more likely you are to get your money back, says Levin.

Don't e-mail financial information: E-mailing your financial information to your financial adviser or tax preparer is not a good idea, says Pam Dixon, executive director at the World Privacy Forum. While Dixon trusts the security of an FDIC-insured bank's website, e-mail accounts are more prone to hacks, she said.

Be wary of strangers: If you don't know who sent you the e-mail, don't click on the link inside of it. It could install software on your computer that gives a fraudster access to your online transactions. And if you get an e-mail or call from someone claiming to be a government organization or financial institution, don't respond with personal information.

"There might be nothing you can do about the NSA ... but we have to understand that we are vulnerable every minute of every day to people who are cybercriminals," said Levin.

 

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