05-06-2021  11:39 pm   •   PDX and SEA Weather
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NORTHWEST NEWS

Oregon Extends COVID Workplace Mask Rule Indefinitely

State officials say the rule, which garnered thousands of public comments, will be in place until it is “no longer necessary to address the effects of the pandemic in the workplace.”

As Reparations Hit Roadblock, Oregon Lawmakers Look to U.S. Congress and Cities

Sen. Frederick pushed for eligible Black Oregonians to receive a lifetime annuity as remedy for slavery, systemic racism.

Landmark Gun Safety Bill Clears Final Vote

The Oregon Senate repassed Senate Bill 554 – approving modifications made in the House to add storage and safety requirements among the bill’s components.

Shooting Highlights Lack of Body Cams Among Portland Police

Two police officers raised their weapons while sheltering behind a tree in a Portland park. They yelled at a homeless man to put up his hands. Moments later, two shots rang out.

NEWS BRIEFS

Unemployment Fix Passes Oregon Senate, Helps Get More Oregonians Back to Work

Many Oregon employers believe this policy will help support their rapidly changing workforce needs, COVID-19 regulations, and worker...

Concrete Wall Around Seattle Police Precinct Comes Down

The city decided to take the wall down after hearing from the community ...

Peloton Recalls Treadmills, Halts Sales, After a Child Dies

Peloton is recalling about 125,000 of its treadmills less than a month after denying they were dangerous and saying it would not pull...

Free Online Classes Promote Sustainable Living

Clark County’s Master Composter Recycler program is offering a series of free sustainable living webinars this spring. ...

Burgerville Introduces a New Plant Based Ice Cream Sandwich

The Pacific Northwest chain is also offering free strawberry shakes to moms on Mother's Day ...

WA Democratic lawmakers decry pause of Pierce County

OLYMPIA, Wash. (AP) — Washington Gov. Jay Inslee is receiving criticism from lawmakers in his own party over his shifting economic reopening plan, with a group of Pierce County Democrats threatening the possibility of a special legislative session following the governor’s recent implementation...

Teen faces federal charge over police union building fire

PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) — A 19-year-old woman accused of setting the Portland police union building on fire faces a federal arson charge. Alma Yessenia Raven-Guido made her first appearance on the one-count indictment in U.S. District Court in Portland Thursday, The...

OPINION

OP-ED: The Supreme Court Can Protect Black Lives by Ending Qualified Immunity

The three officers responsible for the murder of Breonna Taylor are not the first to walk free after killing an unarmed Black person, and unfortunately, especially if things continue as they are, they will not be the last. ...

LETTER TO THE EDITOR: Trade Arron Rodgers

Give Aaron Rodgers a break, Green Bay. Just like Bart Starr & Brett Favre, Aaron Rodgers has been a Hall of Fame quarterback for the Packers for 16 years. ...

Editorial From the Publisher - Council: Police Reform Needed Now

Through years of ceaseless protest, activists have tried to hold Portland Police to account. ...

After the Verdicts

Oregon Attorney General Ellen Rosenblum shares her thoughts after the verdicts ...

AFRICAN AMERICANS IN THE NEWS

Asian American health workers fight virus and racist attacks

NEW YORK (AP) — Medical student Natty Jumreornvong has a vaccine and protective gear to shield her from the coronavirus. But she couldn't avoid exposure to the anti-Asian bigotry that pulsed to the surface after the pathogen was first identified in China. Psychiatry patients...

With ambassador picks, Biden faces donor vs. diversity test

President Joe Biden is facing a fresh challenge to his oft-repeated commitment to diversity in his administration: assembling a diplomatic corps that gives a nod to key political allies and donors while staying true to a campaign pledge to appoint ambassadors who look like America. ...

Atlanta Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms not seeking reelection

ATLANTA (AP) — Atlanta Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms announced Thursday she will not seek a second term, an election-year surprise that marks a sharp turnabout for the city’s second Black woman executive who months ago was among those President Joe Biden considered for his running mate. ...

ENTERTAINMENT

Review: A Black teen on trial in Netflix drama ‘Monster’

“ Monster,” a courtroom drama starring Kelvin Harrison Jr., Jeffrey Wright, Jennifer Hudson and Jennifer Ehle that's premiering Friday on Netflix isn’t actually new at all. Yes, it’s adapted from an acclaimed book by the trailblazing author Walter Dean Myers about a...

Josh Duggar released as he awaits trial on child pornography

FAYETTEVILLE, Ark. (AP) — Former reality TV star Josh Duggar was released from an Arkansas jail Thursday as he awaits trial on federal charges that he possessed and downloaded child pornography. Duggar, 33, did not speak to reporters as he walked out of the Washington County...

Getting up Close with Glenn and Ted Nash, new duo in jazz

NEW YORK (AP) — Glenn Close recently made music-related headlines for her playful performance of “Da Butt” at the Academy Awards, but the revered actor has some real music news: she’s releasing an album with Grammy-winning jazz saxophonist-composer Ted Nash on Friday. ...

U.S. & WORLD NEWS

Some Republicans worry voting limits will hurt the GOP, too

As Republicans march ahead with their campaign to tighten voting laws in political battlegrounds, some in their...

US says fate of nuclear pact up to Iran as talks resume

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Biden administration is signaling that Iran shouldn't expect major new concessions from...

Personal ties: Harris' family in India grapples with COVID

WASHINGTON (AP) — G. Balachandran turned 80 this spring — a milestone of a birthday in India, where he lives....

An online post helps both the hungry and a chef in Ramadan

A few years ago, Mariam Yehia, her mom and a friend started a Ramadan tradition — they bought hot meals and...

In major move, South Africa to end captive lion industry

CAPE TOWN, South Africa (AP) — South Africa says it will end its captive lion industry in a major move for...

Survivor of subway crash reflects on decision to change cars

MEXICO CITY (AP) — A decision to change cars to get closer to a station exit may have saved Erik Bravo, a...

Albina Highway Covers
Evan Perez CNN Justice Reporter

WASHINGTON (CNN) -- The Justice Department said it won't try to block state laws that legalize marijuana and issued loosened enforcement guidelines for federal prosecutors intended to focus on serious trafficking cases.

Attorney General Eric Holder, in a conference call Thursday morning, notified the governors of Colorado and Washington that the department, for now, will not seek to pre-empt those states' laws, which followed voters' approval of ballot measures that legalized recreational marijuana use.

Marijuana will remain illegal under the federal Controlled Substances Act. But the attorney general issued a memo to federal prosecutors in all states tightening federal marijuana prosecution standards.

Under the guidelines, federal prosecutors are required to focus on eight enforcement priorities, including preventing marijuana distribution to minors, preventing drugged driving, stopping drug trafficking by gangs and cartels, and forbidding the cultivation of marijuana on public lands.

The new guidelines have been months in the making and took on some urgency after citizens in Colorado and Washington approved the ballot measures last fall. Nineteen states and the District of Columbia allow some legal use of marijuana, primarily for medicinal purposes.

The attorney general told the Washington and Colorado governors that the Justice Department will work with the states to craft regulations that fall in line with the federal priorities, and reserves the right to try to block the laws if federal authorities find repeated violations.

The memo to prosecutors also seeks to address one common complaint from medicinal marijuana dispensaries in some states, which have been subject to raids by federal agents because they were deemed too big or profitable.

The size and profitability of marijuana businesses will still be a factor prosecutors can consider, but there also must be additional illegal activities for prosecutors to take action.

The new guidelines don't change federal money laundering rules, meaning that some large banks may still be leery of doing business with marijuana producers and sellers. However, Justice Department officials said there is some leeway for banks to provide services to such businesses, so long as they don't violate the eight priorities being assigned to federal prosecutors.

 

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