12-06-2019  12:34 am   •   PDX Weather    •   SEA weather  
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NORTHWEST NEWS

Black Food Professionals See Opportunities to “Scale Up” in School Cafeterias and on Store Shelves

Two Portland women are addressing disparities in the local food scene with Ethiopian and Haitian flavors, ingredients

Portland Fire Chief Sara Boone Climbing Historic Ladders

In 1995, Boone was the first African American woman hired by Portland Fire & Rescue; this year she became its first African American Chief

Christmas Tree Shopping is Harder Than Ever, Thanks to Climate Change and Demographics

For Christmas tree farms to survive, shoppers will need to be more flexible

November Holiday Travel at PDX Brings More Comfort, Convenience and Furry Friends

If you’ve not been to Portland International Airport in a few months, you’re in for some surprises.

NEWS BRIEFS

Conservation Breakthrough for Endangered Butterfly

The Oregon Zoo's breeding success provides new hope in an effort to save Oregon silverspots ...

Meet 80 Local Authors at OHS 52nd Holiday Cheer Book Sale and Signing

This free Oregon Historical Society event will be held this Sunday, December 8 from 12 p.m. – 4 p.m. ...

Need for Blood Doesn’t Stop for Holidays – Donors Needed

Those who come to give through Dec. 18 will receive a Amazon.com Gift Card ...

North Carolina Court Decision Upholds Removal of Confederate Monument

Lawyers argued that the monument was installed at the end of Reconstruction to further the false “Lost Cause” narrative,...

Artist Talk with 13-year-old Local to be Held This Tuesday, Nov. 26

Hobbs Waters will be discussing his solo exhibit “Thirteen” at The Armory in Portland ...

Man who 'freaked out’ on plane, forced landing pleads guilty

PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) — A Washington man who ingested methamphetamine before getting on a plane in Seattle and had what a prosecutor called a "freak out'' on board pleaded guilty Thursday to interfering with crew members after the California-bound flight was forced to land in Portland.The...

Owners of Thai restaurant chain get prison for tax fraud

SEATTLE (AP) — A couple that used software to hide more than jumi million in revenue at the Thai restaurant chain they owned have each been sentenced to several months in prison and ordered to pay thousands of dollars in fines.The U.S. Attorney's Office in Seattle said Thursday that Chadillada...

Missouri fires football coach Barry Odom after 4 seasons

KANSAS CITY, Mo. (AP) — Missouri fired football coach Barry Odom on Saturday, ending the four-year stay of a respected former player who took over a program in disarray but could never get the Tigers over the hump in the brutal SEC.The Tigers finished 6-6 and 3-5 in the conference after...

Powell, Missouri snap 5-game skid with win over Arkansas

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (AP) — In a game started by third- and fifth-string quarterbacks, the outcome was decided by one of their backups. It was appropriate enough for Arkansas and Missouri, two teams facing their longest losing streaks in decades.Fayetteville High School graduate Taylor Powell...

OPINION

Will You Answer the Call for Moral Revival?

In embracing and expanding the legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., Revs. Barber and Theoharis have asked Presidential candidates to consider a debate that focuses exclusively on poverty ...

What I’m Thankful For This Season

Ray Curry gives thanks for a human right that shaped our country throughout the 20th century and that made Thanksgiving possible for so many Americans who, like him, didn’t get here by way of the Mayflower ...

Congressional Black Caucus Members Visit U.S.-Mexico Border: “Mistreatment of Black Immigrants is Another ‘Stain on America’”

Members said they witnessed first-hand the deplorable treatment and plight of Black immigrants ...

Portland, I'm Ready

Last month I had the privilege to stand with hundreds of supporters and announce my intention to run for re-election ...

AFRICAN AMERICANS IN THE NEWS

Kansas judge accused of bigotry, profanities in courthouse

WICHITA, Kan. (AP) — A foul-mouthed Kansas judge accused of bigotry and racism who cursed at courthouse employees so often that a trial clerk kept a “swear journal” documenting his obscene outbursts is facing complaints that his conduct violates the central judicial canons of...

Buttigieg backs black leaders after Indiana event disrupted

HENNIKER, N.H. (AP) — Democratic presidential candidate Pete Buttigieg is applauding African American leaders in his home city for “speaking their truth” after a protester disrupted an event held to demonstrate black support for the mayor in South Bend, Indiana.African American...

Panel calls for Virginia to purge dozens of old racist laws

RICHMOND, Va. (AP) — The laws are still on the books in Virginia: Blacks and whites must sit in separate rail cars. They cannot use the same playgrounds, schools or mental hospitals. They can’t marry each other either.The measures have not been enforced for decades, but they remain in...

ENTERTAINMENT

Timberlake apologizes to wife for ‘strong lapse in judgment’

NEW YORK (AP) — Justin Timberlake has publicly apologized to his actress-wife Jessica Biel days after he was seen holding hands with the co-star of his upcoming movie.The pop star and actor wrote Wednesday on Instagram that he prefers to “stay away from gossip as much as I can, but...

Veteran producer of 'WarGames,' 'Blue Bloods," dies at 85

LOS ANGELES (AP) — Leonard Goldberg, a network and studio executive and producer whose TV credits ranged from “Starsky and Hutch” in the 1970s to the current drama series “Blue Bloods” and whose independent movies included “WarGames” and...

'Once Upon a Time,' 'Portrait' top AP's 2019 best films list

Associated Press Film Writers Lindsey Bahr and Jake Coyle name their choices for the best films of 2019.LINDSEY BAHR1. “Once Upon a Time...in Hollywood": Quentin Tarantino’s movie business fairy tale, featuring all-time performances from two of our great living movie stars, and the...

U.S. & WORLD NEWS

Mitchell Trubisky helps Bears beat Cowboys 31-24

CHICAGO (AP) — Mitchell Trubisky and the Chicago Bears appear to be hitting their stride, even if it might...

R. Kelly charged with paying bribe before marrying Aaliyah

NEW YORK (AP) — Federal prosecutors are accusing singer R. Kelly of scheming with others to pay for a fake...

Chase with stolen UPS truck ends with shootout, 4 dead

MIRAMAR, Fla. (AP) — Four people, including a UPS driver, were killed Thursday after robbers stole the...

Paris police arrest scores amid strike over pension reform

PARIS (AP) — Paris police fired tear gas at demonstrators Thursday as the Eiffel Tower shut down,...

Greta Thunberg reaches Madrid for climate activists' march

MADRID (AP) — Climate activist Greta Thunberg has arrived by train in Madrid, where a global U.N.-sponsored...

Young and old march in unity, fear at French pension change

PARIS (AP) — Anger, solidarity, tear gas and frozen noses.That pretty well sums up the atmosphere inside...

McMenamins
Anthony Advincula New America Media

NEW YORK -- Since Detroit filed for the largest municipal bankruptcy in American history last month, ethnic media publishers and editors have found a common thread among their communities: despite the dire economic challenges, ethnic communities remain resilient and hopeful, looking for opportunities amid the turmoil.

Detroit's bankruptcy has brought huge disruptions – a spike in unemployment in a city that already has a jobless rate that is more than double the national average of 7.6 percent; plummeting property values; cutbacks in city services such as dispatch system for fire, police and ambulance; and an uncertain business climate that could hamper future investments.

But, despite the woes, ethnic media journalists and publishers said that many immigrants see opportunities in the city, and that they are pursuing their American Dream, while helping to revitalize the city.

"Everyone could feel the pain," said Tack Yong Kim, publisher and executive editor of the Michigan Korean Weekly. "And yet if we flip the coin, we see an opportunity for investments."

Kim's newspaper has reported on the impact of bankruptcy on small- to medium-size Korean businesses in Detroit, looking at how they have found creative ways to survive. The paper, for example, ran a story on Korean-owned wig and beauty shops expanding their clientele to other ethnic groups, as African Americans, who make up their customer base, are leaving the city.

Most Korean business owners — about 300 of them in the Detroit metropolitan area — would like to stay and turn the crisis into new ventures, Kim said.

"They live here; they are not going anywhere," he added. "There are many abandoned areas, but that opens the door to create a business zone, with cheap land and labor. We definitely have room for improvement."

There are about 40,000 Koreans living in metro Detroit. In Macomb, Oakland and Wayne counties alone, the combined Asian American population spiked about 37 percent, from 100,792 to 138,075 between 2000 and 2010, according to the latest U.S. Census.

Elias Gutierrez, president and editor of Latino Press, a bilingual weekly, believes that while many residents already left Detroit, Latino immigrants continue to come, replenishing the lost population.

Gutierrez said that Latinos, many of whom work in surrounding plants and factories, are part of "the solution" to the future of Detroit. And, with the growing Latino population, he noted, his community has a significant voting bloc to potentially change Detroit's political landscape.

While Detroit's population has gone down by about 26 percent, the Latino population, particularly in the southeast side of the city, known as the "Mexicantown," continues to rise, along with Latino-owned businesses.

Over the last two decades, according to census data, Detroit's Latino population nearly doubled to 50,000 in 2010. Latinos in the city are also fairly young, with a median age of 24.

According to an Associated Press report, more than $200 million in the past 15 years has been invested in "Mexicantown," a few miles from downtown Detroit. This investment has attracted more restaurants, retail stores, and new residential buildings, including an $11 million condominium development.

Gutierrez regretted that Latinos, despite their growing population, still do not have a political voice in the city. "We don't even have a Hispanic representative in the council, and they [officials] don't even [see] that as an option."

He said Latinos in Detroit opposed the decision by Emergency Manager Kevyn Orr to file for bankruptcy. The decision to file for bankruptcy, Gutierrez said, may have been different if the city had a Latino representative.

A boon in a time of bankruptcy

In the Arab-American community, some view the city's bankruptcy filing as the right time to acquire properties, as real estate prices have plummeted in recent years.

"I have seen Arab immigrants buying houses," said Rasheed Alnozili, publisher of the monthly Yemeni American News. "You can get a house for $10,000. I have friends and relatives who even bought four houses and lots."

Arab Americans make up at least 200,000 of metro Detroit's population, and produces almost $8 billion in salaries and earnings, according to a 2007 Wayne State University study.

Over the last decade, an influx of Arab immigrants into Detroit has boosted businesses such as gas stations, liquor stores, apparel and convenience shops. A 2010 report of the American Arab Chamber of Commerce found that more than 15,000 businesses in metro Detroit are owned by Arab Americans.

"Those kind of investments that immigrants are doing here would help Detroit's fast recovery," Alnozili added. "The abandoned lots could be turned into a more decent housing or commercial space."

Gina Steward, publisher and editor of the Telegram, a weekly publication that serves the African American community, said that in the black community, many are coming back to Detroit.

"Although bankruptcy seems so final, there are training opportunities out there, and African Americans are taking advantage of them," said Steward. "They are now taking classes to improve their chance of getting a job."

The Telegram has been covering "the reactions and thoughts in the black community and what can be done" in the time of bankruptcy. Many African Americans, according to Steward, do not agree that the last resort for the city was to file for Chapter 9.

"A lot [of people] in the [African American] community are not working because they just don't have the skill set that is required. Now they are taking classes," Steward said. "I just hope that companies here would stop bringing their own workers with them when they set up their business and would start offering it to local residents."

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