07-11-2020  4:57 pm   •   PDX and SEA Weather
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NORTHWEST NEWS

Oregon Appeals Court Affirms Portland Renter Relocation Law

The Court affirmed a Portland ordinance requiring landlords to pay tenants’ relocation fees if their rent is increased by at least 10% or if they’re evicted without cause.

Seattle Urged to See a 'World Without Law Enforcement'

Proposals include removal of 911 dispatch from Seattle Police control, budget cuts of 50%

Oregon DOJ to Hold Listening Sessions on Institutional Racism; Leaders Wary

DOJ will hold 11 virtual listening sessions for underserved Oregonians.

Portland Black Community Frustrated as Violence Mars Protests

Black leaders condemn violence from small group of mostly-white activists as Rose City Justice suspends nightly marches

NEWS BRIEFS

OSU Science Pub Focuses on Influence of Black Lives Matter

The influence of the Black Lives Matter movement will be the focus of a virtual Oregon State University Science Pub on July 13 ...

Capital Rx Establishes Scholarship at Howard University to Support Next Generation of Pharmacists

“Each of us has a role to play in paving a more equitable path for the future of the industry,” said AJ Loiacono, Founder and CEO...

Adams Joins Lawmakers in Move to Repeal Trump’s Birth Control Rule

Without action, SCOTUS decision clears way for Trump Admin rule to take effect ...

Portland Art Museum and Northwest Film Center Announce Artist Fund

The fund will help support artists during COVID crisis and beyond ...

The OHS Museum Reopens Saturday, July 11

The Oregon Historical Society museum will reopen with new hours and new safety protocols ...

Oregon reports more than 400 new coronavirus cases

PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) — Oregon officials on Saturday reported 409 new coronavirus cases.The Oregon Health Authority said the high number is partially due to a new reporting system that prevented processing some positive cases on Thursday.The state is reporting 11,851 cases overall of the virus...

Tribes struggle to meet deadline to spend virus relief aid

FLAGSTAFF, Ariz. (AP) — As the coronavirus ripped through the Navajo Nation, it spotlighted longstanding inequities on the reservation where thousands of tribal members travel long distances for medical care, internet service is spotty at best and many homes lack electricity and even running...

Iowa defensive back Jack Koerner hurt in jet ski accident

IOWA CITY, Iowa (AP) — Iowa defensive back Jack Koerner sustained serious injuries when he and a passenger on a jet ski collided with a boat on the Lake of the Ozarks in Missouri.According to a police report, Koerner and Cole Coffin were hurt at about 6:30 p.m. Friday when their watercraft...

Missouri football program pushes again for racial justice

COLUMBIA, Mo. (AP) — Ryan Walters had just arrived at the University of Missouri to coach safeties for the football program when a series of protests related to racial injustice led to the resignations of the system president and the chancellor of its flagship campus.The student-led movement...

OPINION

Recent Protests Show Need For More Government Collective Bargaining Transparency

Since taxpayers are ultimately responsible for funding government union contract agreements, they should be allowed to monitor the negotiation process ...

The Language of Vote Suppression

A specific kind of narrative framing is used to justify voter suppression methods and to cover up the racism that motivates their use. ...

Letter to the Community From Eckhart Tolle Foundation

The Eckhart Tolle Foundation is donating more than 250,000 dollars to organizations that are fighting racism ...

Editorial From the Publisher: Vote as Your Life Depends on It

The Republican-controlled Senate won’t pass the George Floyd Justice in Policing Act, no matter how hard Oregon’s senators and others work to push for change. ...

AFRICAN AMERICANS IN THE NEWS

Pandemic, racism compound worries about Black suicide rate

CHICAGO (AP) — Jasmin Pierre was 18 when she tried to end her life, overdosing on whatever pills she could find. Diagnosed with depression and anxiety, she survived two more attempts at suicide, which felt like the only way to stop her pain.Years of therapy brought progress, but the...

UNC commission recommends re-naming 4 campus buildings

CHAPEL HILL, N.C. (AP) — A commission at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill has voted in favor of a recommendation to rename four campus buildings that currently have ties to slaveholders or white supremacists.The recommendation from the Commission on History, Race & A Way...

Trump lags Biden on people of color in top campaign ranks

WASHINGTON (AP) — Amid a summer of racial unrest and calls for more diversity in leadership, President Donald Trump lags Democratic rival Joe Biden in the percentage of people of color on their campaign staffs, according to data the campaigns provided to The Associated Press.Twenty-five...

ENTERTAINMENT

Sonar, divers search for 'Glee' star thought to have drowned

Teams are using sonar and robotic devices in what could be a long search for “Glee” star Naya Rivera, who authorities believe drowned in a Southern California lake. “We don’t know if she’s going to be found five minutes from now or five days from now,”...

How The Chicks dropped the word 'Dixie' from their name

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — When The Chicks decided to drop the word “Dixie” from the band's name, it was the culmination of years of internal discussions and attempts to distance itself from negative connotations with the word. The 13-time Grammy-winning trio made the switch last...

With new name and album, The Chicks' voices ring loud again

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — The Dixie Chicks are no more. Breaking their ties to the South, The Chicks are stepping into a new chapter in their storied career with their first new music in 14 years. The Texas trio of Emily Strayer, Martie Maguire and Natalie Maines have been teasing new music...

U.S. & WORLD NEWS

AP FACT CHECK: If he's said it once, he's said it 100 times

WASHINGTON (AP) — If saying things 100 times could make them true, President Donald Trump's account of how...

Conservation groups upset by North Cascades grizzly decision

SPOKANE, Wash. (AP) — The forested mountains in and around North Cascades National Park in north central...

The Latest: COVID-19 death toll now at 396 for Navajo Nation

WINDOW ROCK, Ariz. — Navajo Nation officials have reported 10 additional deaths from COVID-19 as the...

UN approves aid to Syria's rebel area through 1 crossing

UNITED NATIONS (AP) — The U.N. Security Council approved a resolution Saturday authorizing humanitarian aid...

Video calls, separate bedrooms: Bolsonaro’s first COVID week

BRASILIA, Brazil (AP) — After months in which Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro downplayed COVID-19 by...

World Council of Churches "dismayed" at Hagia Sophia shift

FRANKFURT, Germany (AP) — The head of the World Council of Churches has written to Turkey's president...

McMenamins
Anthony Advincula New America Media

NEW YORK -- Since Detroit filed for the largest municipal bankruptcy in American history last month, ethnic media publishers and editors have found a common thread among their communities: despite the dire economic challenges, ethnic communities remain resilient and hopeful, looking for opportunities amid the turmoil.

Detroit's bankruptcy has brought huge disruptions – a spike in unemployment in a city that already has a jobless rate that is more than double the national average of 7.6 percent; plummeting property values; cutbacks in city services such as dispatch system for fire, police and ambulance; and an uncertain business climate that could hamper future investments.

But, despite the woes, ethnic media journalists and publishers said that many immigrants see opportunities in the city, and that they are pursuing their American Dream, while helping to revitalize the city.

"Everyone could feel the pain," said Tack Yong Kim, publisher and executive editor of the Michigan Korean Weekly. "And yet if we flip the coin, we see an opportunity for investments."

Kim's newspaper has reported on the impact of bankruptcy on small- to medium-size Korean businesses in Detroit, looking at how they have found creative ways to survive. The paper, for example, ran a story on Korean-owned wig and beauty shops expanding their clientele to other ethnic groups, as African Americans, who make up their customer base, are leaving the city.

Most Korean business owners — about 300 of them in the Detroit metropolitan area — would like to stay and turn the crisis into new ventures, Kim said.

"They live here; they are not going anywhere," he added. "There are many abandoned areas, but that opens the door to create a business zone, with cheap land and labor. We definitely have room for improvement."

There are about 40,000 Koreans living in metro Detroit. In Macomb, Oakland and Wayne counties alone, the combined Asian American population spiked about 37 percent, from 100,792 to 138,075 between 2000 and 2010, according to the latest U.S. Census.

Elias Gutierrez, president and editor of Latino Press, a bilingual weekly, believes that while many residents already left Detroit, Latino immigrants continue to come, replenishing the lost population.

Gutierrez said that Latinos, many of whom work in surrounding plants and factories, are part of "the solution" to the future of Detroit. And, with the growing Latino population, he noted, his community has a significant voting bloc to potentially change Detroit's political landscape.

While Detroit's population has gone down by about 26 percent, the Latino population, particularly in the southeast side of the city, known as the "Mexicantown," continues to rise, along with Latino-owned businesses.

Over the last two decades, according to census data, Detroit's Latino population nearly doubled to 50,000 in 2010. Latinos in the city are also fairly young, with a median age of 24.

According to an Associated Press report, more than $200 million in the past 15 years has been invested in "Mexicantown," a few miles from downtown Detroit. This investment has attracted more restaurants, retail stores, and new residential buildings, including an $11 million condominium development.

Gutierrez regretted that Latinos, despite their growing population, still do not have a political voice in the city. "We don't even have a Hispanic representative in the council, and they [officials] don't even [see] that as an option."

He said Latinos in Detroit opposed the decision by Emergency Manager Kevyn Orr to file for bankruptcy. The decision to file for bankruptcy, Gutierrez said, may have been different if the city had a Latino representative.

A boon in a time of bankruptcy

In the Arab-American community, some view the city's bankruptcy filing as the right time to acquire properties, as real estate prices have plummeted in recent years.

"I have seen Arab immigrants buying houses," said Rasheed Alnozili, publisher of the monthly Yemeni American News. "You can get a house for $10,000. I have friends and relatives who even bought four houses and lots."

Arab Americans make up at least 200,000 of metro Detroit's population, and produces almost $8 billion in salaries and earnings, according to a 2007 Wayne State University study.

Over the last decade, an influx of Arab immigrants into Detroit has boosted businesses such as gas stations, liquor stores, apparel and convenience shops. A 2010 report of the American Arab Chamber of Commerce found that more than 15,000 businesses in metro Detroit are owned by Arab Americans.

"Those kind of investments that immigrants are doing here would help Detroit's fast recovery," Alnozili added. "The abandoned lots could be turned into a more decent housing or commercial space."

Gina Steward, publisher and editor of the Telegram, a weekly publication that serves the African American community, said that in the black community, many are coming back to Detroit.

"Although bankruptcy seems so final, there are training opportunities out there, and African Americans are taking advantage of them," said Steward. "They are now taking classes to improve their chance of getting a job."

The Telegram has been covering "the reactions and thoughts in the black community and what can be done" in the time of bankruptcy. Many African Americans, according to Steward, do not agree that the last resort for the city was to file for Chapter 9.

"A lot [of people] in the [African American] community are not working because they just don't have the skill set that is required. Now they are taking classes," Steward said. "I just hope that companies here would stop bringing their own workers with them when they set up their business and would start offering it to local residents."

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