04-14-2024  1:56 am   •   PDX and SEA Weather
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NORTHWEST NEWS

Four Ballot Measures for Portland Voters to Consider

Proposals from the city, PPS, Metro and Urban Flood Safety & Water Quality District.

Washington Gun Store Sold Hundreds of High-Capacity Ammunition Magazines in 90 Minutes Without Ban

KGW-TV reports Wally Wentz, owner of Gator’s Custom Guns in Kelso, described Monday as “magazine day” at his store. Wentz is behind the court challenge to Washington’s high-capacity magazine ban, with the help of the Silent Majority Foundation in eastern Washington.

Five Running to Represent Northeast Portland at County Level Include Former Mayor, Social Worker, Hotelier (Part 2)

Five candidates are vying for the spot previously held by Susheela Jayapal, who resigned from office in November to focus on running for Oregon's 3rd Congressional District. Jesse Beason is currently serving as interim commissioner in Jayapal’s place. (Part 2)

Winning Powerball Ticket Worth $1.3 Billion Sold in Portland

A Powerball player in Portland has won a jackpot worth more than jumi.3 billion. The prize is the eighth largest in U.S. lottery history. The Oregon Lottery says the winning ticket was sold in Portland, Oregon. The winning numbers were: 22, 27, 44, 52, 69 and the red Powerball 9

NEWS BRIEFS

Americans Willing to Pay More to Eliminate the Racial Wealth Gap, Creating a New Opportunity for Black Business Owners

National research released today provides encouraging news that most Americans are willing to pay a premium price for products and...

Vibrant Communities Commissioner Dan Ryan Directs Development Funding to Complete Next Phase of Gateway Green Project

Portland Parks & Recreation (PP&R) is beginning a new phase of accessibility and park improvements to Gateway Green, the...

Application Opens for Preschool for All 2024-25 School Year

Multnomah County children who will be 3 or 4 years old on or before September 1, 2024 are eligible to apply now for free preschool...

PCC and LAIKA Partner to Foster Diversity in Animation

LAIKA is contributing ,000 to support student scholarships and a new animation and graphics degree. ...

Mt. Hood Community College Hosts Spring Career Fair Featuring Top Portland Employers

The event will be held April 24 at Mt. Hood Community College. ...

OPINION

Gallup Finds Black Generational Divide on Affirmative Action

Each spring, many aspiring students and their families begin receiving college acceptance letters and offers of financial aid packages. This year’s college decisions will add yet another consideration: the effects of a 2023 Supreme Court, 6-3 ruling that...

OP-ED: Embracing Black Men’s Voices: Rebuilding Trust and Unity in the Democratic Party

The decision of many Black men to disengage from the Democratic Party is rooted in a complex interplay of historical disenchantment, unmet promises, and a sense of disillusionment with the political establishment. ...

COMMENTARY: Is a Cultural Shift on the Horizon?

As with all traditions in all cultures, it is up to the elders to pass down the rituals, food, language, and customs that identify a group. So, if your auntie, uncle, mom, and so on didn’t teach you how to play Spades, well, that’s a recipe lost. But...

A Full Court Press to Get the Lead Out

With a “goal of identifying and remediating lead hazards in at least 2,800 Lancaster County homes,” LG Health is setting an example for the private sector. And the Biden-Harris administration’s focus on environmental justice and access to clean and safe...

AFRICAN AMERICANS IN THE NEWS

ENTERTAINMENT

U.S. & WORLD NEWS

Justin Lear CNN

(CNN) -- The pitch reads: "Would you know if an odorless, colorless and tasteless rape drug were put in your drink? What if your cup, straw or glass changed color to warn you?"

The pitch comes from a group of people who've put their minds together to work toward developing a cup and straw that will change color in the presence of date-rape drugs.

When substances like GHB, ketamine and Rohypnol touch the surface of the drinkware, they will turn into the designated color used to detect the drug, alerting you to its presence.

In a video posted to YouTube to promote a funding campaign, DrinkSavvy Inc. founder Mike Abramson said the idea came from a bad experience where he was once "roofied" -- referring to Rohypnol, a sedative -- while out drinking with friends.

"Within the past three years, three of my very close friends, and myself, have been the unwitting victims of being drugged."

He added, "DrinkSavvy's ultimate goal is to use the success of this campaign to convince bars, clubs and colleges to make DrinkSavvy the new safety standard and eventually make drug-facilitated sexual assault a crime of the past."

Abramson says of his experience: He was at a club in Boston celebrating a friend's birthday and went to get a drink and then "felt like I had 15 drinks. Luckily, friends were able to get me home safely."

Afterward, he went to John McDonald, professor of chemistry at Worcester Polytechnic Institute, where Abramson had attended college, with his idea to create a detection system. After about two years of research, a prototype was launched in the funding campaign.

The Boston-based company started a campaign on Indiegogo in November 2012 with hopes to raise $50,000. The monthlong campaign resulted in more than 2,500 contributors surpassing their $50,000 goal and getting the company one step closer to making the product a reality.

And Abramson is a finalist in the MassChallenge, an annual $1 million startup competition and accelerator program that helps entrepreneurs get access to mentors, marketing and other resources.

Over the next few months, drink straws and, possibly, cups that can detect the anesthetic GHB will be sent out to the people who financially supported the campaign to get feedback.

Abramson says the company also has done tests to detect Rohypnol and the anesthetic ketamine, and expects to roll out cups and straws that will detect all three drugs in early to mid-2014. At that point the products will also be available on the company's website.

One of the company's main goals is to get its products in bars and in the hands of college students. Abramson says they are in discussion with several colleges to make this new technology part of their rape-prevention initiatives. He said he is well aware that his company's products won't solve all the sexual assault problems, telling CNN "this is not 100% fool-proof, it's not a cure-all."

According to a 2007 study for the National Institute of Justice, only a small fraction (2.4%) of female undergraduate students who were sexually assaulted were certain or suspected they were incapacitated after having been given a drug without her knowledge.

The Center for Women and Families notes that alcohol is the chief concern: "For rape which takes place on campuses, alcohol is being used in 90% of cases."

A pilot program is set to take place at a bar in Boston in either December or January.

As for cost, DrinkSavvy says prices will be competitive with what the bars already pay for cups and straws.

 

The Skanner Foundation's 38th Annual MLK Breakfast