10-06-2022  4:42 pm   •   PDX and SEA Weather
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NORTHWEST NEWS

Vancouver City Council Bans Large Fossil Fuel Facilities

While new facilities that distribute, extract, refine or process fossil fuels have been temporarily prohibited by the Vancouver City Council since 2020, the council this week unanimously made the ban permanent

Community Group Meets to Discuss Vision for Albina Arts Center

Oregon Community Foundation is in the process of figuring out how to gift the building back to a Black-led non-profit that is willing to center arts, healing and intergenerational community-building within the space, in perpetuity.

E. Washington Rancher Sentenced for 'Ghost Cattle' Fraud

Cody Easterday was sentenced Tuesday afternoon in federal court in Yakima, Washington, for what U.S. District Court Judge Stanley Bastian called “the biggest theft or fraud I’ve seen in my career."

$40K Awarded to Woman Injured by Portland Police at Protests

Erin Wenzel sued the city for assault, battery and negligence, claiming that on Aug. 14, 2020, an officer “ran at her and violently slammed into her with a nightstick” while she was leaving the area as police had instructed. 

NEWS BRIEFS

Transgender Woman Assaulted, Cops Seek Help Finding Suspects

A transgender woman was assaulted on Monday in Eugene, Oregon, by a man and three others who allegedly used transgender slurs ...

Rosa Floyd Honored as 2023 Oregon Teacher of the Year

Nellie Muir Elementary IB School educator surprised with state honor ...

Amazon to Invest $150 Million in Funds That Provide Underrepresented Entrepreneurs With Access to Capital

Amazon today announced Amazon Catalytic Capital, a new initiative to invest 0 million in venture capital funds, accelerators, and...

Bonamici to Host Webinar on Student Loan Forgiveness Plan

On Thursday, Oct. 6 Congress member Suzanne Bonamici will host a webinar on the Biden-Harris Administration’s transformational...

SUNDAY: “No More Gun Violence” Block Party in North Portland

Event marks final in summer series aimed at bringing people together to reclaim their neighborhoods and fight for a future free of gun...

Idaho Supreme Court hears arguments over 3 abortion laws

BOISE, Idaho (AP) — The Idaho Supreme Court heard arguments in lawsuits over three of Idaho’s abortion laws on Thursday, sharply questioning attorneys about the value placed on a pregnant woman’s health, the state’s interest in ensuring that pregnancies are carried to term and Idaho’s...

Vancouver City Council bans large fossil fuel facilities

VANCOUVER, Wash. (AP) — The city council in Vancouver, Washington, has approved a permanent ban on new fossil fuel developments after years of temporary moratoriums. While new facilities that distribute, extract, refine or process fossil fuels have been temporarily prohibited by...

No. 2 Georgia looking for return to top form against Auburn

ATHENS, Ga. (AP) — Don't expect Auburn players to empathize with concerns expressed this week about No. 2 Georgia's sudden dip from championship form. The Bulldogs, who play Auburn on Saturday, fell from the top spot in The Associated Press Top 25 this week after having to rally for...

No. 2 Georgia looking for 6th straight win over rival Auburn

Auburn (3-2, 1-1 SEC) at No. 2 Georgia (5-0, 2-0), Saturday, 3:30 p.m. ET (CBS) Line: Georgia by 29 1/2, according to FanDuel Sportsbook. Series record: Georgia leads 62-56. WHAT’S AT STAKE? Georgia will try to regain its momentum after...

OPINION

Democracy, Disasters, and the Black Vote

The Black vote has an opportunity to determine the outcome of the November 8 general election. Let's not be the only people who don’t realize our strength. ...

No Room for Black Folk

A recent interview with Dr. Ebony Elizabeth Thomas and an associate professor, reveals the inability of certain white Americans to share the benefits of our society ...

The Cruelty of Exploiting Vulnerable People for Political Advantage

There is always a new low for Trump Republicans. And that is pretty frightening. ...

The Military to American Youth: You Belong to Me

The U.S. military needs more than just money in its annual budget. It needs access to America’s young people as well — their wallets, their bodies, and their minds. ...

AFRICAN AMERICANS IN THE NEWS

Republican nominee pivots to crime in Kansas governor's race

TOPEKA, Kan. (AP) — The Republican candidate for Kansas governor is pivoting from education to crime as a focus in the final weeks of the campaign, portraying the Democratic incumbent as anti-police because she created a commission on policing and racial justice in response to the state's...

Police to limit Mississippi capital roadblocks after lawsuit

JACKSON, Miss. (AP) — Police in Mississippi's capital city have agreed to pull back on aggressive roadblocks in response to a lawsuit that said Jackson officers were violating people’s constitutional right to be free of unreasonable search and seizure. A settlement was filed...

UN rights body rejects Western bid to debate Xinjiang abuses

GENEVA (AP) — In a close diplomatic victory for China, the U.N.'s top human rights body on Thursday voted down a proposal from Britain, Turkey, the United States and other mostly Western countries to hold a debate on alleged rights abuses against Muslim Uyghurs and other ethnic minorities in...

ENTERTAINMENT

Ukraine orchestra's leader debuts at Met with Russian opera

NEW YORK (AP) — It’s been quite a year for conductor Keri-Lynn Wilson, forming an orchestra from scratch, leading it on a 12-city tour, and then as soon as it disbanded going straight to the Metropolitan Opera to prepare for an opening-week debut. Hers were the guiding hands that...

Hilary Swank talks filming new series while expecting twins

Hilary Swank has announced she's pregnant with twins and says that revelation might explain some of her actions on set of her new ABC series “ Alaska Daily.” “You don’t tell for 12 weeks for a certain reason. But then, like, you’re growing and you’re using the bathroom a...

Jada Pinkett Smith has deal for 'no holds barred' memoir

NEW YORK (AP) — Jada Pinkett Smith has a lifetime of thoughts she'd like to set down. The actor, singer, entrepreneur and co-host of the Facebook Watch show “Red Table Talk” has a deal for what Dey Street Books is calling an “honest and gripping memoir” that will cover her...

U.S. & WORLD NEWS

Russia strikes Ukraine housing; detains refugees at border

KYIV, Ukraine (AP) — Russian missiles hit apartment buildings in the southern Ukrainian city of Zaporizhzhia on...

Family of victim in 'Serial' case asks court to halt case

ANNAPOLIS, Md. (AP) — The family of the victim in the murder case chronicled in the first season of the...

Sweden seizes evidence at Baltic Sea pipeline leak site

COPENHAGEN, Denmark (AP) — Sweden’s domestic security agency said Thursday that its preliminary investigation...

EXPLAINER: Russia's military woes mount amid Ukraine attacks

Even as the Kremlin moved to absorb parts of Ukraine in a sharp escalation of the conflict, the Russian military...

UN rights body rejects Western bid to debate Xinjiang abuses

GENEVA (AP) — In a close diplomatic victory for China, the U.N.'s top human rights body on Thursday voted down a...

Survivors tell grim tale of southern Greek migrant shipwreck

KYTHIRA, Greece (AP) — Many had embarked on the stomach-churning sea journey before; many will follow. ...

Wenqian Zhu CNN Money

NEW YORK (CNNMoney) -- Jobs for journalists are on the upswing.

That's good news for an industry in upheaval. Just this month, there's been a flurry of deals involving struggling marquee American publications. Amazon founder and CEO Jeff Bezos bought The Washington Post, Red Sox owner John Henry purchased The Boston Globe, and Newsweek was bought by a digital news company IBT Media. Job cuts had been common at all three publications in recent years.

Now, a new survey from the University of Georgia shows that the tide may be turning for journalism graduates. About 66% of 2012 journalism graduates landed a full-time job roughly six to eight months after graduation, up from 62% in 2011. It was a also a big jump from 56% in 2009, during the depths of the recession, when the number of graduates that landed a job was at the lowest point in two decades .

"Employers might be shedding senior-level jobs, but there's always pressure to hire entry-level jobs," said Lee Becker, professor of journalism at the University of Georgia and co-author of the report. Becker said the number of jobs might also be rising because of the increase in start-up online publications.

Journalism graduates have faced a tough market in recent years. The effect of the recession was exacerbated by the dramatic shifts in the industry.

The rise in digital media and the different ways in how people consume news and entertainment, via their smartphones and tablets, has led to a decline in newspaper and magazine circulation. Thousands of newsroom jobs have been slashed at both large and small publications.

In keeping with these changes, journalists who work at online publications are now starting to command top salaries, whereas magazine and radio reporters' pay is below the industry average, the survey found.

Overall, salaries have also been rising. The median annual starting salary climbed to $32,000 in 2012, from $31,000 in 2011.

But it's not yet time to pop the champagne.

Journalists' salaries are a lot lower than the median annual salary of $42,666 for all 2012 graduates, according to the National Association of Colleges and Employers.

That's not too different from how it's been historically, because people are attracted to the glamor of a journalist's job, rather than the pay.

"Being a journalist is more of a calling than a job," said William McKeen, chairman of the journalism department at Boston University College of Communication.

Other firms are also noticing the uptick. Job postings for journalists are up about 30% since 2009, according to Joseph Jaccom, U.S. job manager at Gorkana, a media intelligence firm.

Still, it's not enough to take away the anxiety over jobs for journalism students. Rachel Gross, a graduate student at Medill School of Journalism, Northwestern University, will graduate this December. She has some solid credentials -- she interned at Wired magazine and freelanced for The New York Times Bay Area.

But Gross is mentally preparing herself for a career that might not be as steady.

"I'm freelancing now and would like to keep freelancing after I graduate," Gross said. "It will be great if I do get a full-time job."

 

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