07-07-2022  12:01 am   •   PDX and SEA Weather
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NORTHWEST NEWS

Oregon Gov. Candidate Kotek Tests Positive for COVID-19

Kotek said on Twitter she was resting and taking it easy for a few days and that she’s grateful to be vaccinated and boosted

Obama Nominee In As New Oregon Community Foundation CEO

Lisa Mensah returns to her home state.

Eugene Woman Attacked With Acid for Third Time Since March

A Eugene, Oregon, woman who had acid thrown on her while walking her dog in March has been the target of two additional acid attacks at her home

Minimum Wage Increase Initiative Qualifies in WA City

An initiative to increase the minimum hourly wage in Tukwila, Washington, by more than has qualified for the November ballot.

NEWS BRIEFS

Sharon Nickleberry Rogers Appointed to the Oregon Housing Stability Council

The council establishes OHCS’ mission to meet the housing and services needs of low- and moderate-income Oregonians, and reviews and...

State Partnership Announces New Foreclosure Prevention Campaign to Support Homeowners

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Man Punches Father, Child in Suspected Anti-Asian Bias Crime

A man punched a father and his 5-year-old daughter riding bikes on Portland's Eastbank Esplanade near the Hawthorne Bridge in an...

On View This Weekend: Afro-American Heritage Bicentennial Commemorative Quilt

A History Spotlight from Boyle Family Executive Director Kerry Tymchuk ...

State Continues Paying Out Oregon Emergency Rental Assistance Program Applications to Renters and Landlords Across Oregon

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Yellowstone flooding reveals forecast flaws as climate warms

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14-year-old girl shot, killed while riding in car in Tacoma

TACOMA, Wash. (AP) — A 14-year-old girl was shot and killed Wednesday while riding in a car in Tacoma, Washington, police said. The Tacoma Police Department said on Twitter at about 1 p.m. Wednesday that juveniles were inside a car near 19th and Martin Luther King Jr. Way in the...

OPINION

The Lost Conversation

Because I find loyalty to the ex-President or to gun rights so mysterious, I would have welcomed some sort of dialogue with opposing views, though we all sensed it was a bridge too far. ...

Choice Without Shackles

The constitutional originalists do what they must to keep ignorance viable, to keep us anchored to the certainties of the old days ...

Biden’s Menthol Ban Follows the ‘Racist Law’ Playbook

The ban on menthol threatens to do more harm than good for the Black people these activists purport to want to protect ...

Black Women Will Suffer the Harshest Consequences After the Overturn of Roe

Black women are nearly three times more likely to die during childbirth than white women and are more likely to face maternal health issues. ...

AFRICAN AMERICANS IN THE NEWS

Ex-cop Chauvin to get federal sentence for Floyd's killing

MINNEAPOLIS (AP) — Derek Chauvin will learn his sentence Thursday for violating George Floyd's civil rights, with a deal in place that would extend the former Minneapolis police officer's time behind bars while shifting him to possibly more favorable conditions in a federal prison. ...

Ex-Texas chief deputy pleads guilty to using excessive force

TYLER, Texas (AP) — A former East Texas chief deputy pleaded guilty Wednesday to violating a prisoner’s civil rights by using excessive force on him, according to court documents. Steven Craig Shelton was the second-ranked official in the Van Zandt County Sheriff’s Office when...

School system enters settlement in desegregation case

MADISON, Ala. (AP) — A federal judge has approved an agreement to settle a long-running desegregation case with a north Alabama school system, prosecutors said Wednesday. The school system agreed to take steps to ensure equal educational opportunities for Black students, including...

ENTERTAINMENT

Review: 'Bull Durham' fans, rejoice at 'Church of Baseball'

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New this week: 'The Sea Beast,' early Elton John, 'Maggie'

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Jacqueline Stewart to lead Academy Museum of Motion Pictures

Film scholar Jacqueline Stewart has been named the next director and president of the Academy Museum of Motion Pictures in Los Angeles. The organization’s board of trustees said Wednesday that Stewart, who previously served as the museum’s chief artistic and programming officer,...

U.S. & WORLD NEWS

Iranian TV: Revolutionary Guard accuses diplomats of spying

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Appeals arguments heard on immigrants brought to US as kids

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Police: Parade shooting suspect contemplated 2nd shooting

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EU lawmakers back gas, nuclear energy as sustainable

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Cairo's historic Nile River houseboats removed in govt push

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Some Russians won't halt war protests, despite arrest fears

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Sara Sidner and Laura Smith-Spark CNN

(CNN) -- A decision by world-renowned physicist Stephen Hawking not to attend a conference in Israel in support of an academic boycott of the country has sparked controversy in Israel and a vitriolic debate online.

Hawking, who's a professor at Britain's Cambridge University, had initially accepted an invitation to the high-profile Israeli Presidential Conference, taking place in Jerusalem in June.

His change of heart this week appears to be the result of pressure from Palestinian academics to abide by a boycott set up in protest over Israel's occupation of Palestinian territory.

"A letter was sent on Friday to the Israeli president's office from Stephen Hawking regarding his decision not to attend the Presidential Conference, based on advice from Palestinian academics that he should respect the boycott," a Cambridge University spokesman told CNN on Thursday.

Hawking is also unable currently to fly for health reasons, the spokesman said.

Cambridge University initially said Hawking's poor health was the reason he was no longer attending, according to local media reports. Hawking, who is quadriplegic as a result of an incurable degenerative disease, has had repeated health problems.

Hawking's letter said he had first accepted the invitation "to express my opinion on the prospects for a peace settlement but also because it would allow me to lecture on the West Bank," the conference organizers said.

His decision to boycott the conference, hosted by Israeli President Shimon Peres, a Nobel peace laureate, has prompted a "Twitterstorm."

Some tweeters accuse him of anti-Semitism or comment on his physical disabilities, while others applaud his support for the Palestinian academics.

One tweeter, Ali Abunimah, observes: "Amazing how many Israelis on Facebook want Stephen Hawking dead, electrocuted or made to suffer in other nasty ways."

Haaretz writer Chemi Shalev, who describes himself as a "political junkie, proud father, concerned Israeli, veteran journalist," tweets: "My take: Stephen #Hawking is now the academic boycott movement's unlikely poster boy."

'Outrageous and improper'

Israel Maimon, chairman of the Presidential Conference, said Hawking's decision to pull out of the event was wrong.

"The academic boycott against Israel is in our view outrageous and improper, certainly for someone for whom the spirit of liberty lies at the basis of his human and academic mission," he said in a statement.

"Israel is a democracy in which all individuals are free to express their opinions, whatever they may be. The imposition of a boycott is incompatible with open, democratic dialogue."

Some 5,000 people from around the world are expected to attend, Maimon said, to hear speakers who include global technology company executives, academics, Nobel laureates, artists and past and present world leaders.

Former U.S. President Bill Clinton, Soviet-era President Mikhail Gorbachev and former UK Prime Minister Tony Blair are all expected to attend, he added.

Hawking, who's also a cosmologist, astronomer and mathematician, is the author of books including the best-seller, "A Brief History of Time: From the Big Bang to Black Holes."

The Boycott, Divestment and Sanctions movement was established in 2005 by Palestinian civil society groups, which called for international groups and "people of conscience" to boycott or put pressure on Israel "until it complies with international law and Palestinian rights."

Omar Barghouti, one of the founding members of the movement, told CNN: "Stephen Hawking is the most prominent academic today to respect the Palestinian boycott guidelines and to refuse to visit Israel. This reminds us of the moral weight of academics in the boycott of apartheid of South Africa."

He said Hawking had been convinced by the "unanimous Palestinian voice" he heard from his contacts within the Palestinian community.

"There is deep appreciation among the Palestinians for Professor Hawking's respecting the boycott, and we sincerely hope that we convince many hesitant academics to follow suit and to shoulder a moral responsibility of boycotting Israel until it complies with international law," Barghouti said.

The Jerusalem Post reports that Hawking has visited Israel four times, most recently in 2006, when he lectured at Israeli and Palestinian universities.

West Bank housing

Israel's government gave initial approval Wednesday to plans to build 296 housing units in the settlement of Bethel, near the West Bank city of Ramallah.

Palestinian Authority President Mahmoud Abbas strongly condemned the decision, the official Palestinian news agency WAFA said Thursday.

Presidential spokesman Nabil Abu Rudeina, in a media statement quoted by WAFA, said the Israeli move would sabotage the peace process and efforts made by the U.S. administration to move it forward.

A U.N. Human Rights Council report in January said Israeli settlements had taken a "heavy toll" on the rights and sovereignty of Palestinians.

It outlined the consistent violation of Palestinians' rights in what it called a "creeping annexation" by Israel in East Jerusalem and the West Bank.

Palestinians welcomed the report's findings, but Israel, which considers the Human Right Council to be biased, said the report would hurt the peace process.

There are about 250 settlements in the West Bank and East Jerusalem, the report said, all started since Israel seized the lands after the Six Day War in 1967.

Israel's consistently growing presence in East Jerusalem and the West Bank has caused great tension between Israel and the Arab world, including Palestinians. Israel says its presence is needed for security.

CNN's Kareem Khadder, Stephanie Halasz, Michael Schwartz and Saad Abedine contributed to this report.

 

Jan. 6 Committe Hearings - Day 7

The House committee investigating the Jan. 6 attack will hold its seventh public hearing Tuesday, July 12, scheduled to begin at 7 a.m. PT (10 a.m. ET).

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