12-02-2022  6:14 am   •   PDX and SEA Weather
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NORTHWEST NEWS

Tough Oregon Gun Law Faces Legal Challenge, Could Be Delayed

Midterm voters narrowly passed one of the toughest gun control laws in the nation, but the new permit-to-purchase mandate and ban on high-capacity magazines faces a lawsuit that could put it on ice just days before it's set to take effect.

Portland Approves $27M for New Homeless Camps

Public opposition to the measure and the money that will fund it has been heated, with critics saying it will criminalize homelessness and fail to address its root causes.

Portland Settles Lawsuit Over Police Use of Tear Gas

The lawsuit was originally filed by Don't Shoot Portland in June 2020. “Our freedom of expression is the foundation of how we make social change possible,” Teressa Raiford said in a news release. “Black Lives Still Matter.”

Oregon Lawmakers Lift Security Measure Imposed on Senator

Since July 2019, Sen. Brian Boquist had been required to give 12 hours notice before coming to the Oregon State Capitol, to give the state police time to bolster their security and to ensure the safety of people in the Capitol.

NEWS BRIEFS

The James Museum Opens Black Pioneers: Legacy In The American West

This first-of-its-kind-exhibition explores Black history in the West with a timeline of pictorial quilts. ...

Use of Deadly Force Investigation Involving Clackamas County Sheriff and Oregon State Police Concludes

The grand jury’s role was solely to determine whether the involved officers’ conduct warranted criminal charges; questions...

Oregon Faces Snow-Plow Driver Shortage Heading Into Winter

New federal licensing rules for drivers resulted in longer wait times to obtain a commercial driver's license, which contributed to...

7 die from flu in Washington state, activity 'very high'

SEATTLE (AP) — Flu activity in the state is now considered very high, according to the Washington State Department of Health. State health officials on Thursday reported over 1,200 new flu cases from Nov. 13-19, which was more than double the case count of previous weeks, KING 5...

Illinois lawmakers OK crime bill cleanup, plan ends bail

SPRINGFIELD, Ill. (AP) — Democrats who control the Illinois General Assembly approved followup clarifications of their watershed criminal justice overhaul Thursday, appeasing critics by adding numerous offenses to a list of crimes that qualify a defendant to remain jailed while awaiting trial. ...

Missouri holds off Arkansas 29-27 to reach bowl eligibility

COLUMBIA, Mo. (AP) — Missouri and Arkansas will be headed to similar bowl games after the Tigers held off the Razorbacks 29-27 on Saturday night, leaving each of the bitter border rivals 6-6 on the season. Only one walked out of Faurot Field with victory cigars. Brady...

Rivalry week should bring SEC bowl forecast into clear focus

GAINESVILLE, Fla. (AP) — It’s rivalry week for most of the Southeastern Conference. The Egg Bowl. The Iron Bowl. The Palmetto Bowl. The Sunshine Showdown. Clean, Old-Fashioned Hate. The Battle Line Rivalry. It’s a chance for everyone to either avoid or add to the powerhouse...

OPINION

‘I Unreservedly Apologize’

The Oregonian commissioned a study of its history of racism, and published the report on Oct. 24, 2022. The Skanner is pleased to republish the apology written by the editor, Therese Bottomly. We hope other institutions will follow this example of looking...

City Officials Should Take Listening Lessons

Sisters of the Road share personal reflections of their staff after a town hall meeting at which people with lived experience of homelessness spoke ...

When Student Loan Repayments Resume, Will Problems Return Too?

HBCU borrowers question little loan forgiveness, delays to financial security ...

Tell the Supreme Court: We Still Need Affirmative Action

Opponents of affirmative action have been trying to destroy it for years. And now it looks like they just might get their chance. ...

AFRICAN AMERICANS IN THE NEWS

Musk says Twitter has suspended rapper Ye over swastika post

Twitter has suspended rapper Ye after he tweeted a picture of a swastika merged with the Star of David. It is the second time this year that Ye has been suspended from the platform over antisemitic posts. Twitter CEO Elon Musk confirmed the suspension by replying to...

25 years later, Bangladesh closer to peace in border region

RANGAMATI, Bangladesh (AP) — A quarter century ago, Modhumala Chakma says it was impossible to leave her house in the evening and walk around the nearby hills because they were controlled by a tribal insurgent group seeking autonomy in southeastern Bangladesh. “It was a difficult...

Report: Wide racial disparity in New York prison discipline

ALBANY, N.Y. (AP) — Black and Hispanic people incarcerated in New York state prisons are more likely than white people to face further punishment once they wind up behind bars, according to a state inspector general report released Thursday. A Black person behind bars in New York...

ENTERTAINMENT

Mistrial after jury deadlock in Danny Masterson rape case

LOS ANGELES (AP) — A judge declared a mistrial Wednesday at the rape trial of “That ’70s Show” actor Danny Masterson after jurors, who were leaning strongly toward acquitting him, deadlocked following the monthlong trial in which the Church of Scientology played a supporting role. ...

Prosecutor: Weinstein a 'degenerate rapist' and 'predator'

LOS ANGELES (AP) — Harvey Weinstein was a “predator” with unmistakable patterns who used his Hollywood power to lure women into meetings, sexually assault them and escape the consequences, a prosecutor said in closing arguments Wednesday at the former movie mogul's Los Angeles trial. ...

New version of 'The Wiz' to tour and end up on Broadway

NEW YORK (AP) — A new production of “The Wiz” is heading out on a national tour next year before following the yellow brick road to Broadway, with its director hoping the show becomes a “touchstone for a new generation.” Director Schele Williams tells The Associated Press...

U.S. & WORLD NEWS

LGBTQ chorus in Colorado Springs unifies community with song

COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo. (AP) — Below the vaulted dome and dark wood beams of a church in Colorado Springs, a gay...

Ukrainian engineers scramble to keep mobile phones working

KYIV, Ukraine (AP) — With Ukraine scrambling to keep communication lines open during the war, an army of...

World Cup Viewer's Guide: Final day of group stage

DOHA, Qatar (AP) — Brazil and Portugal already advanced into the knockout round so the focus on the final day of...

Ukraine says animals' eyes sent to some of its embassies

KYIV, Ukraine (AP) — Ukrainian embassies and consulates in six European countries have received packages...

Israeli peace activists show presence in West Bank hot spot

HEBRON, West Bank (AP) — Dozens of Israeli peace activists toured the occupied West Bank’s largest city Friday...

Biden, Macron vow unity against Russia, discuss trade row

WASHINGTON (AP) — Presidents Joe Biden and Emmanuel Macron vowed to maintain a united front against Russia on...

CNN



WASHINGTON (CNN) -- Obama administration handling of the terror attack on the U.S. diplomatic compound in Benghazi, Libya, that killed four Americans, including Ambassador Christopher Stevens, sparked outrage from certain Republicans, but none of that was evident at the confirmation hearing of his successor.Only three members of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee attended the hearing on Tuesday for Ambassador Deborah Jones, President Barack Obama's nominee to take over in Tripoli. She mentioned the armed assault last September 11 in her opening statement and in answering questions.

Jones, a career diplomat, said stopping the flow of weapons through Libya's porous border will "enable the defeat of volatile and deadly rogue militias, and prevent a repeat of the tragedy in Benghazi."

She said that she "will work closely with the Libyan government to see that justice realized" in the Benghazi attacks.

In an interview with CNN's Dana Bash afterward, Jones said she was pleased with the substance of the meeting and that her focus was on looking forward in Libya, not looking back.

"I was pleased that there was focus on the substance of Libya we got a lot of work to do there," Jones said. "There are a lot of serious issues there that require having an ambassador on the ground. And I think that this town ... the politics is something completely different. I'm really focused not on the forensics but on the future."

Tuesday's muted atmosphere was a prelude to Wednesday's House Oversight Committee hearing on the Benghazi attack.

Panel Chairman Darrell Issa has released testimony from three whistle blowers who plan to discuss what they feel were security failures at the compound during the attack.

The testimony of Greg Hicks, a former top U.S. diplomat in Libya, has been the focus of Issa's hearing. Hicks is expected to discuss how the American military could have done more to protect those in Benghazi.

Democrats on the House committee charge the hearing is a charade.

The committee's senior Democrat, Maryland Rep. Elijah Cummings, said members of Congress have an obligation to actually investigate claims before coming to conclusions and making public accusations.

"Unfortunately, House Republicans have taken the opposite approach," he said.

Despite being nine months removed from the terrorist attack, the tragedy has maintained a steady drumbeat on Capitol Hill, particularly with Republicans, who claim to not yet know the full story of what transpired.

But only three of the 18 members of the Foreign Relations Committee attended Tuesday's hearing for Jones -- Sens Bob Corker and fellow Republican John McCain and Democrat Bob Menendez.

Senators paid tribute to those lost in Benghazi.

"We can never forget Ambassador Chris Stevens and the three other American public servants, Tyrone Woods, Sean Smith, and Glen Doherty, who tragically lost their lives on the attack on the U.S. mission in Benghazi last September," Menendez said.

Jones said she would take responsibility for personnel security if confirmed as ambassador.

"On security -- and again this is something that is, well, as we know it is deadly serious for us," she said. "It is the role of the ambassador -- the ambassador is the principal security officer at post. And it is the ambassador who has to decide whether to allow people to travel here or there, whether to ask for additional assets, whether to insist on additional assets."

She added that if you don't get the answers you need then "pick up the phone and you speak to the people" responsible for that information.

"That is what I intend to do. That is what I have always done," she said.

Jones is a respected career diplomat who has held consulate and embassy posts in Turkey, the United Arab Emirates, Ethiopia, Iraq, Syria and Argentina. Most recently, she served as U.S. ambassador to Kuwait from 2008 to 2011.

There has been a great deal of tension between Democrats and Republicans on Benghazi, partly stemming from televised comments after the attack by U.N. Ambassador Susan Rice, who said it was a spontaneous act that grew out of a demonstration over an anti-Islam film made in the United States.

Later, the administration called the Benghazi matter a terror attack. Rice and other officials said that her comments explaining the incident publicly relied on official talking points. Still, the initial statements and the resulting controversy cost her a likely nomination to succeed Hillary Clinton as secretary of state.

Certain GOP members also sharply questioned Clinton over the administration's explanation of events and the state of security at the compound prior to the attack.

Clinton said she took responsibility for the deaths, stating that as secretary of state, she was "in charge of the State Department's 60,000-plus people all over the world."

In January 2013, Clinton testified for more than five hours before the House and Senate Foreign Relations committees. In her testimony, she acknowledged a "systematic breakdown" on Benghazi and said her department was taking additional steps to increase U.S. security at diplomatic posts.

Critics have questioned the validity of continued congressional scrutiny, especially Democrats who say Republicans are only interested in discrediting the administration and hurting Clinton's chances of running for president in 2016.

 

 

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