07-08-2020  3:16 pm   •   PDX and SEA Weather
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NORTHWEST NEWS

Oregon DOJ to Hold Listening Sessions on Institutional Racism; Leaders Wary

DOJ will hold 11 virtual listening sessions for underserved Oregonians.

Portland Black Community Frustrated as Violence Mars Protests

Black leaders condemn violence from small group of mostly-white activists as Rose City Justice suspends nightly marches

Protester Dies After Car Hits Two on Closed Freeway

Summer Taylor, 24, of Seattle died and Taylor and Diaz Love of Portland were injured. The driver, Dawit Kelete has been arrested

Police Union Contract Extended, Bargaining to Continue

Negotiations will resume in January 2021.

NEWS BRIEFS

The OHS Museum Reopens Saturday, July 11

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Meyer Memorial Trust Announces New Trustee

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African American Alliance for Home Ownership Announces New Board Member

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Ploughshares Fund announces over $1 million in Grants to Stop Nuclear Threats

The global security foundation’s board of directors awards grants to 15 organizations working on nuclear weapons issues ...

Chip Miller Named Associate Artistic Director of Portland Center Stage

Miller originally joined the company in the spring of 2019, in the role of associate producer. ...

Police: million lost due to ongoing Portland protests

PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) — Downtown businesses in Portland, Oregon, have sustained about million in damages and lost customers because of violent nightly protests that have wracked the city, authorities said Wednesday.At a police briefing, Deputy Chief Chris Davis said the intensity of the...

Coronavirus kills funding of 37 projects in Oregon

BEND, Ore. (AP) — A steep drop in lottery funds due to the COVID-19 crisis has killed the sale of 3 million in state bonds to pay for major projects in Oregon, the Bulletin newspaper of Bend reported Wednesday.The 37 projects authorized by the Legislature at the end of the 2019 session...

Iowa defensive back Jack Koerner hurt in jet ski accident

IOWA CITY, Iowa (AP) — Iowa defensive back Jack Koerner sustained serious injuries when he and a passenger on a jet ski collided with a boat on the Lake of the Ozarks in Missouri.According to a police report, Koerner and Cole Coffin were hurt at about 6:30 p.m. Friday when their watercraft...

Missouri football program pushes again for racial justice

COLUMBIA, Mo. (AP) — Ryan Walters had just arrived at the University of Missouri to coach safeties for the football program when a series of protests related to racial injustice led to the resignations of the system president and the chancellor of its flagship campus.The student-led movement...

OPINION

Recent Protests Show Need For More Government Collective Bargaining Transparency

Since taxpayers are ultimately responsible for funding government union contract agreements, they should be allowed to monitor the negotiation process ...

The Language of Vote Suppression

A specific kind of narrative framing is used to justify voter suppression methods and to cover up the racism that motivates their use. ...

Letter to the Community From Eckhart Tolle Foundation

The Eckhart Tolle Foundation is donating more than 250,000 dollars to organizations that are fighting racism ...

Editorial From the Publisher: Vote as Your Life Depends on It

The Republican-controlled Senate won’t pass the George Floyd Justice in Policing Act, no matter how hard Oregon’s senators and others work to push for change. ...

AFRICAN AMERICANS IN THE NEWS

Biden-Sanders task forces unveil joint goals for party unity

WASHINGTON (AP) — Political task forces Joe Biden formed with onetime rival Bernie Sanders to solidify support among the Democratic Party's progressive wing recommended Wednesday that the former vice president embrace major proposals to combat climate change and institutional racism while...

Indiana governor defends officer response to assault report

INDIANAPOLIS (AP) — Indiana Gov. Eric Holcomb defended the state's Department of Natural Resources on Wednesday amid criticism that the agency's conservation officers did not adequately respond to the reported assault of a Black man by a group of white men at a southern Indiana lake last...

Five takeaways from Facebook's civil rights audit

A two-year audit of Facebook’s civil rights record found that the company’s elevation of free expression — especially by politicians — above other values has hurt its progress on other matters like discrimination, elections interference and protecting vulnerable users....

ENTERTAINMENT

Coppola and Henson companies get loans for winery, puppetry

LOS ANGELES (AP) — From a godfather of cinema to Kermit the Frog, the U.S. government’s small-business lending program sent money into unexpected corners of the entertainment industry. While legendary names like Francis Ford Coppola and Jim Henson hardly evoke the image of...

Review: Hanks lends steady, sober hand to taut naval drama

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How many people saw 'Hamilton'? For now, that's a secret

NEW YORK (AP) — Disney+'s streaming of “Hamilton” was surely the biggest event on television screens over the holiday weekend.Just how big, however, remains a mystery.Disney knows, but it's not telling. Data is coming in to the Nielsen company, too, but won't be released until...

U.S. & WORLD NEWS

Ivy League suspends fall sports due to coronavirus pandemic

The Ivy League on Wednesday became the first Division I conference to suspend all fall sports, including football,...

Health official: Trump rally 'likely' source of virus surge

OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) — President Donald Trump's campaign rally in Tulsa in late June that drew thousands of...

Window into virus surge: Death, recovery at Houston hospital

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Ivory Coast PM, presidential candidate Amadou Coulibaly dies

ABIDJAN, Ivory Coast (AP) — Prime Minister Amadou Gon Coulibaly, the presidential candidate of Ivory...

UK gets creative: Job bonus and eating out schemes announced

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Hong Kong inaugurates Beijing's national security office

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McMenamins
Holly Yan and Chelsea J. Carter CNN

(CNN) -- Unable to speak, the surviving suspect in the Boston Marathon bombings has been communicating with authorities in writing, a senior federal official briefed on the investigation told CNN Monday.



Investigators have been questioning Dzhokhar Tsarnaev since Sunday, according to a second source -- a senior law enforcement official.

Neither source would say what, if anything, Tsarnaev has been telling investigators about his alleged role in the bombing that killed three and wounded more than 170 a week ago Monday.

While Tsarnaev, 19, has not yet been charged with a crime, investigators believe he and his brother, Tamerlan Tsarnaev, were behind the attacks.

Tamerlan Tsarnaev, 26, died early Friday at a hospital after a shootout with police.

While authorities say Bostonians can rest easier now that the younger Tsarnaev is in custody, nagging questions hinder any total sense of security: Why would the assailants want to kill or maim throngs of innocent civilians, and could this happen again?

Massachusetts Gov. Deval Patrick and Boston Mayor Thomas Menino have asked Bostonians and residents in the rest of the state to observe a moment of silence at 2:50 p.m. Monday, exactly a week after twin explosions near the marathon's finish line. Bells will toll one minute later to honor the victims of the tragedy that traumatized the city.

Police chief: The carnage could have been worse

In the tumultuous days after the bombings, the Tsarnaev brothers allegedly killed a university police officer, led authorities on a harrowing chase and hurled explosives at police, authorities said. Another officer, seriously wounded in a firefight with the suspects, was recovering Monday, Boston Police Commissioner Ed Davis said.

Tamerlan Tsarnaev died after a gun battle with officers in the Boston suburb of Watertown in which more than 200 rounds were exchanged. Authorities have yet to announce the official cause of death.

According to Watertown Police Chief Edward Deveau, the elder Tsarnaev stepped out of the car he and his brother had allegedly stolen earlier that night and began walking toward officers, firing as he went.

When he ran out of ammunition, officers tackled him and tried to handcuff him, Deveau said Saturday.

But Dzhokhar Tsarnaev came barreling at them in the stolen vehicle, the chief said. The officers scrambled out of the way, and the vehicle then ran over the older brother and dragged him for a short distance.

Tamerlan Tsarnaev also had explosives on his body, officials have said.

Dzhokhar Tsarnaev was found bleeding later that night, hiding in a boat in a backyard in Watertown, Massachusetts.

Police say they believe the brothers were planning another attack before the shootout with police disrupted their plans, Davis said.

"The two suspects were armed with handguns at the scene of the shootout, and there were multiple explosive devices, including a large one that was similar to the pressure cooker device that was found on Boylston Street," Davis said on CNN's "Starting Point" Monday.

"I believe that the only reason that someone would have those in their possession was to further attack people and cause more death and destruction," he said.

Authorities believe the brothers bought bomb components locally but think that their guns came from elsewhere, another federal law enforcement official said. The official, who was not authorized to publicly discuss the case, said authorities are trying to trace the guns.

Investigators are also trying to determine whether anyone else was involved in the bombings.

But Davis, speaking Sunday to CNN's Don Lemon, said that he was confident that the brothers were "the two major actors in the violence that occurred."

"I told the people of Boston that they can rest easily, that the two people who were committing these vicious attacks are either dead or arrested, and I still believe that," the police chief said.

Clues about radicalization?

While investigators piece together the brothers' actions leading up to the marathon bombings, details have emerged suggesting the elder Tsarnaev was turning radical.

The Tsarnaev family hails from the Russian republic of Chechnya and fled the brutal wars there in the 1990s. The two brothers were born in Kyrgyzstan, authorities said.

An FBI official said agents interviewed Tamerlan Tsarnaev in 2011 at the request of the Russian government. The FBI said Russia claimed that he was a follower of radical Islam and that he had changed drastically since 2010.

But the Russian government's request was vague, a U.S. official and a law enforcement source said Sunday. The lack of specifics limited how much the FBI was able to investigate Tamerlan, the law enforcement official said.

Tamerlan Tsarnaev apparently became increasingly radical in the past three or four years, according to an analysis of his social media accounts and the recollections of family members. But so far, there has been no evidence of active association with international jihadist groups.

In August 2012, soon after returning from a visit to Russia, the elder Tsarnaev brother created a YouTube channel with links to a number of videos. Two videos under a category labeled "Terrorists" were deleted. It's not clear when or by whom.

According to The Boston Globe, Tamerlan Tsarnaev disrupted a service a Cambridge mosque in January after a speaker likened the Muslim Prophet Mohammed to Martin Luther King Jr. The congregation "shouted him out of the mosque," the Globe quoted mosque spokesman Yusufi Vali as saying.

Moving forward

A week after the marathon bombings, 55 people remain hospitalized, including three in critical condition, according to a CNN tally.

At least a dozen survivors have endured amputations.

The transit system officer wounded in the firefight with the Tsarnaev brothers, Richard Donohue, was improving Monday, Davis said.

"He was in grave condition when he went to the hospital, so we're very optimistic at this point in time, and our prayers are with him and his family," he said.

Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, meanwhile, remains in serious but stable condition, according to the U.S. Attorney's Office District of Massachusetts. A federal law enforcement source with knowledge of the investigation told CNN the younger brother has a gunshot wound to his neck, and he had a tube down his throat to help him breathe.

It's unclear whether Tsarnaev was wounded during his capture or in the earlier shootout with police that left his older brother dead, said the source, who spoke on condition of anonymity.

Tsarnaev had not been charged as of Monday morning.

Authorities have not publicly stated what charges will be filed against Tsarnaev, but a Justice Department official who has been briefed on the case told CNN he will face federal terrorism charges and possibly state murder charges.

While Massachusetts does not have a death penalty, prosecutors could seek the death penalty at the federal level.

Getting back to normal

It could take up to two more days before the area around the site of the explosions can reopen to the public, Davis said.

The FBI has not yet turned the scene back over to local authorities, the police chief said.

"We have to allow store owners to go in there first. It won't be open to the general public for maybe another day so the store owners can get their business back on track," Davis said. "We want to get people back in their homes as soon as possible, and we're working diligently on that right now."

Also on Monday, the one-week anniversary of the Boston attacks, thousands of runners across the country will pound the pavement in a show of unity and support for the victims and their families.

At least 80 cities are participating in a "Run for Boston in Your City" campaign called #BostonStrong, organizer Brian Kelley said.

The global campaign is "a run for those that were unable to finish, a run for those that may never run again" and "a run for us to try and make sense of the tragedy that has forever changed something we love."

CNN's Gloria Borger, Fran Townsend, Tim Lister, Paul Cruickshank, Deborah Feyerick, Jill Dougherty, Pamela Brown, Julian Cummings, Barbara Starr, Susan Candiotti and Jake Tapper contributed to this report.

  

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