07-17-2019  11:43 am   •   PDX Weather    •   SEA weather  
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NORTHWEST NEWS

Portland Grocery Launches an Innovative Solution for Dog-Owning Customers

Customers can use the app-connected houses as a safer and smarter solution when shopping with their dogs, rather than leaving them in the car or tied up on the street.

Oregon State Workers Could Get up to 15% Raises

Public employee unions representing Oregon state workers have negotiated new contracts that would provide pay increases of up to 15% over the next two-year budget period.

Oregon Fossil of Bone-Crushing Mammal a First in the US Northwest

A fossil jaw bone misidentified for 50 years turns out to belong to a bone-crushing mammal and is the first to be found in the Northwest, scientists said.

Tobacco in Oregon: Cheap, Sweet, Plentiful and Sold at Kids’ Eye Level

New report shines light on tobacco industry marketing across Oregon

NEWS BRIEFS

Living Room Realty Announces Scholarship Opportunity

The scholarship will help facilitate a path toward a real estate career for underrepresented communities ...

U.S. Bank Invests $1 Million with the National Museum of African American History and Culture

“Through this support of the National Museum, we hope these historical stories and rich cultural experiences will continue to...

Police Evacuate City Hall, Close Terry Schrunk Plaza

City Hall closed due to suspicious package ...

Oregon Settles with Health Insurer Premera Over Data Breach

Oregon to receive jumi.3 million from settlement ...

Michael Lewellen Appointed New Vice President for Marketing and Communications at University of Portland

Former Portland Trail Blazers executive steps into new role July 15 ...

Earthquake recorded off Oregon coast

BANDON, Ore. (AP) — A magnitude 5.3-magnitude earthquake was recorded about 150 miles off the Oregon coast.The U.S. Geological Survey says the quake at 8 a.m. Wednesday was about 152 miles west-northwest of Bandon. It had a depth of more than 8.5 miles.Authorities say the temblor was likely...

Editorials from around Oregon

Selected editorials from Oregon newspapers:___Mail Tribune, July 14, on the state Legislature's failure to deliver fire aid:The 2019 legislative session will be remembered more for what it didn't accomplish than for what it did, thanks in large measure to the two walkouts staged by Senate...

Missouri DE Williams pleads to misdemeanor, put on probation

COLUMBIA, Mo. (AP) — Missouri defensive end Tre Williams pleaded guilty to a misdemeanor and was sentenced to two years of unsupervised probation after prosecutors dropped a felony domestic assault charge.The Columbia Daily Tribune reports Williams pleaded guilty to peace disturbance and was...

Florida's Mullen hoping for sizable leap in 2nd season

HOOVER, Ala. (AP) — Dan Mullen made a big leap in his second season at Mississippi State, but his Florida team doesn't have quite so much room to grow.Unless, of course, the Gators can jump to national contender status. That's what another four-win improvement would mean.The Bulldogs won...

OPINION

Hearing on H.R. 40 Puts Reparations Debate in National Spotlight

“These are the vestiges of enslavement that people don't want to deal with,” said Dr. Julianne Malveaux, the former President of Bennett College. ...

Perfecting the Cat Nap: Lessons on Sleep From a Cat

Watching Soleil's languorous lifestyle has inspired me to establish better sleeping habits which have led to increased happiness and productivity. ...

Happy Independence Day!

The Skanner would like to wish all of our readers a relaxing and safe 4th of July. Wondering about the history and science of fireworks? ...

Plastics Are Strangling the Planet

You have probably heard about islands of plastic (and other garbage) inhabiting our oceans. The impact of this is the dying off of entire segments of oceans. In addition, many countries in the global North, including but not limited to the USA, look at the...

AFRICAN AMERICANS IN THE NEWS

Prosecutors seek prison terms for Virginia rally attackers

Hatred for Jews, blacks and feminists motivated three members of a white supremacist group to attack counterprotesters at a rally for far-right extremists in Virginia, federal prosecutors argue in seeking stricter sentences for the men this week.Justice Department prosecutors recommend prison...

Trump vs. Dems: 'Racist,' socialist' lines drawn for 2020

WASHINGTON (AP) — With tweets and a vote, President Donald Trump and House Democrats established the sharp and emotionally raw contours of the 2020 election campaigns.In the process, they have created a fraught political frame: "racists" vs. "socialists."Trump's aggressive condemnation of...

Eric Garner's mother speaks out on anniversary of his death

NEW YORK (AP) — Eric Garner's mother urged the New York City police commissioner to fire the officer accused of using a chokehold in the death of her son, as she marked the five-year anniversary of her loss Wednesday.Gwen Carr spoke the day after the U.S. Department of Justice announced that...

ENTERTAINMENT

Judge orders R. Kelly held in jail without bond in sex case

CHICAGO (AP) — A federal judge on Tuesday ordered R. Kelly held in jail without bond after a prosecutor warned that the singer accused of having sex with minors and trying to cover up the crimes would pose an extreme danger to young girls if set free."If he was attracted to middle school...

25 years later, 'The Lion King' roars again (with Beyoncé)

LOS ANGELES (AP) — It was just a few months ago that director Jon Favreau was sitting in a scoring session with composer Hans Zimmer for "The Lion King," his ambitious and technology-driven reimagining of the 1994 animated classic, and he and everyone else in the room were getting a little...

'The Chain' is a mid-life hit for novelist Adrian McKinty

NEW YORK (AP) — With his novel "The Chain" headed for publishing best-seller lists and summer packing lists, Adrian McKinty can now laugh as he remembers an old and "failed" novel."I was in Mexico City, trying to write about Trotsky, the assassination of Trotsky, and it wasn't going well,"...

U.S. & WORLD NEWS

John Paul Stevens emerged as Supreme Court's leading liberal

WASHINGTON (AP) — John Paul Stevens moved left as the Supreme Court shifted to the right during his nearly...

Federal data shows opioid shipments ballooned as crisis grew

CLEVELAND (AP) — Newly released federal data shows how drugmakers and distributors increased shipments of...

Top diplomat: Iran must build missiles for defense

TEHRAN, Iran (AP) — Iran's foreign minister said Wednesday that his country has no choice but to...

Architect: Notre Dame far from safe for restoration work

PARIS (AP) — A French architect says that Notre Dame Cathedral still isn't safe enough for restoration work...

Italy, FBI crack down on Mafia clan with Gambino ties

ROME (AP) — Italian police and FBI agents have cracked down on a Palermo-area Mafia clan with ties to the...

Gunmen in restaurant in northern Iraq kill Turkish diplomat

IRBIL, Iraq (AP) — Unknown gunmen opened fire inside a Turkish-owned restaurant in the northern Iraqi city...

McMenamins
Catriona Davies CNN

(CNN) -- After Mukhtar Mai was gang raped on the orders of a tribal court in Pakistan in 2002, local tradition dictated she was expected to commit suicide.

She defied her attackers and fought for justice. More than a decade on, she is still fighting for women's rights in Pakistan and inspiring many around the world.

Mai's "honor revenge" was carried out on the orders of a jirga -- a tribal assembly -- because her 12-year-old brother was wrongly accused, according to a subsequent investigation ordered by the Punjab governor, of improper relations with a woman from another tribe.

"They decided I should be punished against my brother's crime," Mai, now 39, told CNN through an interpreter. "They immediately acted upon that decision and dragged me out. That was the hardest moment of my life."

While the majority of rapes go unreported in Pakistan, according to Pakistani national newspaper The Express Tribune, Mai was determined not to stay silent.

"I was of the view that I must fight back to get my rights," said Mai. "First of all, there was the rape, and afterwards when I tried to call the police, I received death threats that I would be killed if I went to a police station.

"I sat inside the four walls of my home, but I was encouraged by well-wishers. My local community gave me the courage to fight back and go to the court."

"I decided that what happened to me should never happen to anyone else."

Initially, six men were sentenced to death for the rape or abetting the rape. However, in 2011, Pakistan's Supreme Court overturned all but one of the convictions and the men were freed.

Mai grew up in a small village in the Punjab region of Pakistan, where she never went to school and was forced into marriage at the age 13.

After only a few years, she was divorced and living back home with her parents.

"I came back to my parents' home and I started to make myself independent. I started working at home doing sewing and household work, low income work.

"I did that for 10 or 12 years and generated enough money to buy my own cattle."

At the age of 28, her life changed forever when she was gang raped as a result of her younger brother's alleged crime.

Far from destroying her, as her attackers would have expected, the incident made Mai determined to fight for women's rights and she set up the Mukhtar Mai Women's Organization.

Convinced that lack of education contributed to the poor treatment of women, Mai established a girls' school, initially in a single room of her family home with a just one teacher and three students, including herself.

"The first school I attended was my own school," said Mai.

For the first three years, she ran the school without any outside funding.

"Whatever I earned I used to pay the salary of the teacher. Sometimes I had to sell my own things," she said.

Mai's school gained worldwide attention following a spate of articles in the international press in 2005 and donations began to pour in -- as well as some government money.

Today the Mukhtar Mai Girl's Model School offers free education, books and uniforms to 550 girls from nursery to the beginning of high school.

However Mai said the school has received no government funding for the last three years and is struggling for income.

In addition, she has set up a women's shelter and resource center for victims of violence, while her memoir, "In the Name of Honor", was published in 2006 and has been translated into 23 languages.

In 2009, Mai married a police officer who acted as her bodyguard and they now have a one-year-old son.

Late last year, the shooting of the young Pakistani activist Malala Yousafzai brought women's rights back to worldwide attention.

Malala, now 15, was shot by the Taliban for campaigning for girls' education in Swat Valley in October and is now recovering in hospital in the United Kingdom.

"I am praying for Malala's health and recovery," said Mai. "She is a very little girl and the work she was doing and intends to do is great.

"More girls are now getting an education in her region due to Malala."

In the decade since her attack, Mai believes she has made a difference to women's rights in Pakistan, but still has a long way to go.

"Things have improved, but not as much as they should have done. There are laws, but the laws are not always implemented.

"It's an evolutionary process and it will take time. I hope I have given the courage to girls and women to speak about women's rights and to open new horizons."

Mai is the headline speaker at the Geneva Summit for Human Rights and Democracy on February 19.

 

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