11-30-2021  10:08 pm   •   PDX and SEA Weather
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NORTHWEST NEWS

Attorney General Rosenblum Says She Won’t Run for Governor

Attorney General Ellen Rosenblum on Monday put to rest rumors and officially said she will not enter Oregon’s crowded race for governor.

Portland’s Black Population Grew in the Last Decade, but That’s Not the Whole Story

The Black population in North and Northeast Portland declined by 13.5% over the last 10 years as more than 3,000 Black residents moved away, new numbers from the 2020 census show.

City’s Budget Windfall Means More for Police, Despite NAACP Demands

Group calls out lack of engagement from City Hall.

Oregon Resists Dropping Controversial Investments

Oregon residents are increasingly pushing for the state to divest from fossil fuel companies and other controversial investments, but the state treasury is resisting and putting the onus on the Legislature.

NEWS BRIEFS

Open Enrollment Deadline Is Dec. 15 for Health Insurance Coverage Starting Jan. 1, 2022

Help applying and financial assistance is available through the Oregon Health Insurance Marketplace ...

Commissioners From Three Counties Select Lawrence-Spence to Fill Senate District 18 Vacancy

District 18 includes portions of west Portland and Tigard. ...

Congressional Black Caucus Issues a Statement on the Passing of Former Congresswoman Carrie P. Meek

Meek, the first Black person to represent Florida in Congress since the post-Civil War Reconstruction, died Sunday, Nov. 28 at her...

Vsp Global Partners With Black EyeCare Perspective to Eliminate Inequities and Increase Representation of People of Color in the Eye Care Industry

Partnership includes scholarships, leadership development, and outreach to prospective optometrists ...

Shop Local and Earn Free Parking With Parking Kitty

Find the purrfect gift for your loved ones by supporting small businesses and shopping local this holiday season, thanks to the...

Seattle to pay .5M to settle police wrongful-death suit

SEATTLE (AP) — The city of Seattle will pay .5 million to settle a wrongful-death civil lawsuit filed on behalf of the children of a pregnant Black woman who was fatally shot by two white Seattle police officers in 2017. Karen Koehler, a Seattle attorney who represented...

WA residents asked to remain vigilant amid latest rain event

BELLINGHAM, Wash. (AP) — Officials on Tuesday asked residents in northwest Washington to remain vigilant as another atmospheric river brought heavy rain to an area that experienced severe flooding earlier this month and additional flooding earlier this week. Forecasters said 2...

No. 25 Arkansas beats Missouri, caps best season since 2011

FAYETTEVILLE, Ark. (AP) — Sam Pittman grinned for almost the entirety of his postgame press conference Friday night. The Arkansas coach and his team had done something no others ever had. The No. 25 Razorbacks capped their regular season with a 34-17 victory over Missouri,...

Mizzou's Drinkwitz returning to Arkansas for rivalry game

FAYETTEVILLE, Ark. (AP) — Just 45 miles of interstate highway separate Eli Drinkwitz from where he started and where he is now as Missouri's head football coach. Raised in the small Arkansas town of Alma, Drinkwitz will come full circle Friday when his Tigers visit No. 25...

OPINION

State is Painting Lipstick on Its One-of-a-kind, Long-term-care Law

Starting in January, the unpopular law imposes a stiff new tax of 58 cents per 0 earned for every worker in the state ...

Giving Thanks

Just by being alive we can be sure of having moments of sadness as well as happiness. When you’re active in politics, you experience both wins and losses. Sometimes it can be hard to feel grateful. ...

Acting on Climate will Require an Emphasis on Environmental Justice

Climate change affects us all, but its effects aren’t distributed equally. ...

Small Businesses Cannot Survive With Current Level of Postal Service

At The Skanner News office we received an important piece of correspondence that was postmarked June 12, 2021, and delivered to us on November 4, 2021. ...

AFRICAN AMERICANS IN THE NEWS

4 jurors seated for Kim Potter trial, many more needed

MINNEAPOLIS (AP) — Prosecutors and defense attorneys for the suburban Minneapolis police officer charged in Daunte Wright's death are to resume jury selection Wednesday after seating four the first day. Kim Potter, 49, sat quietly Tuesday as attorneys...

In shadow of Texas gas drilling sites, health fears escalate

ARLINGTON, Texas (AP) — At a playground outside a North Texas day care, giggling preschoolers chase each other into a playhouse. Toddlers scoot by on tricycles. Just uphill, Total Energies is pumping for natural gas. The French energy giant wants to drill three new wells on...

In shadow of Texas gas drilling sites, health fears escalate

ARLINGTON, Texas (AP) — At a playground outside a North Texas day care center, giggling preschoolers chase each other into a playhouse. Toddlers scoot by on tricycles. A boy cries as a teacher helps him negotiate over a toy. Uphill from the playground, peeking between trees,...

ENTERTAINMENT

Families turn down Travis Scott offer to pay for funerals

HOUSTON (AP) — Several families of the 10 people who died from injuries in a massive crowd surge at the Astroworld festival have turned down an offer by headliner Travis Scott to pay for their loved ones’ funeral costs. Attorneys for the families of four of the victims said...

Vegas police confirm case involving R&B singer Trey Songz

LAS VEGAS (AP) — Police said Tuesday they’re investigating sexual assault allegations involving R&B artist Trey Songz at a Las Vegas Strip hotel. In a statement, Las Vegas police said sex crimes detectives received a complaint about a Sunday incident involving the singer...

Review: Paul Verhoeven gives us nunsense with 'Benedetta'

Christmas is just around the corner and Paul Verhoeven has left a present for us during this hallowed season: A film with lesbian nuns, full-frontal nudity, tons of sex, Catholic hypocrisy and brutal self-flagellation. Happy birthday, Jesus! “Benedetta” doesn't know if it's...

U.S. & WORLD NEWS

EXPLAINER: What's next for Trump's privilege fight?

WASHINGTON (AP) — The losing side is likely to head straight to the Supreme Court, whatever decision the U.S....

Conservatives eagerly await Supreme Court abortion arguments

It's the moment conservatives have been waiting for. Oral arguments at the Supreme Court on...

Leftist wins Honduran presidential vote after rival concedes

TEGUCIGALPA, Honduras (AP) — Honduras' ruling party conceded defeat Tuesday in presidential elections held two...

Polish women protest attempts to further restrict abortion

WARSAW, Poland (AP) — Women’s rights activists in Poland used red paint to symbolize blood as they protested...

Belarus president offers to host Russian nuclear weapons

MOSCOW (AP) — The longtime president of Belarus said Tuesday that his country would be ready to host Russian...

NATO chief says allies must prepare for the worst in Ukraine

RIGA, Latvia (AP) — NATO Secretary General Jens Stoltenberg warned Tuesday that the U.S.-led military...

Halimah Abdullah CNN

WASHINGTON (CNN) -- The Republican Party's message makeover may soon face a critical test as it considers the Violence Against Women Act, legislation that draws into sharp contrast the differences between the two parties on women's issues.

The Senate passed the measure on Wednesday, 78-22, and sent it to the House of Representatives, where proponents expect a fight that would test Republican efforts to embrace inclusiveness.

The Senate bill includes services, such as legal aid and shelter stays to domestic violence victims without regard to their immigration status or sexual orientation.

"Today, the Senate passed a strong bipartisan bill to reauthorize and strengthen the Violence Against Women Act. This important step shows what we can do when we come together across party lines to take up a just cause," President Barack Obama said in a statement.

"The bill passed by the Senate will help reduce homicides that occur from domestic violence, improve the criminal justice response to rape and sexual assault, address the high rates of dating violence experienced by young women, and provide justice to the most vulnerable among us," he said.

Obama signaled that the House should move quickly.

With the Senate passage, the pending House debate also opens the door to the types of thorny battles that stymied the bill last year and may have helped cost Republicans support among many women voters in the presidential race.

Those fights included issues like barring agencies that receive funding under the law from discriminating against gays and lesbians, allowing immigrants who face domestic violence to seek legal status, and giving tribal authorities new power to prosecute cases on Indian reservations.

Republican strategists are keenly aware that the party must broaden its appeal to women and Latinos.

Political experts said that action on the bill could help with that effort, if handled carefully. Though, the issue remains a challenge for some.

"All of the Republican women in the Senate are co-sponsoring the Senate bill. However, in the House, the women are more conservative and have been on board with the House position in opposition to this and in opposition to including protections for homosexuals," said Michele Swers, a Georgetown University American government professor.

Swers said the measure will especially test House Majority Leader Eric Cantor's "new more compassionate GOP message."

The Violence Against Women Act mostly provides support for organizations that serve domestic violence victims. Criminal prosecutions of abusers are generally the responsibility of local authorities, but the act stiffened sentences for stalking under federal law.

Supporters credit the Clinton-era act, which expired in 2011, with sharply reducing the number of lives lost to domestic violence.

Last year, the Senate passed a similar bill by a slightly less convincing margin, while the House approved its version on a mostly party line vote. But Congress failed to reach a compromise.

The Senate measure had more Republican support this time, meaning that it might get through both chambers this session, political experts said.

"This is not and never should be a partisan political issue," Republican Sen. Susan Collins of Maine said on the Senate floor last week.

But Florida Republican Marco Rubio, a potential 2016 presidential candidate, was one of a handful of senators who voted against bringing the measure to the floor. He has cited funding concerns.

Conservative groups are also closely watching how Republican lawmakers navigate the debate.

"In its current form, (the bill's) narrow focus ignores many of the proven causes of violence, is subject to waste, fraud, and abuse, and -- in some cases -- is harmful to the very victims it was intended to help," Christina Villegas, a visiting fellow at the conservative Independent Women's Forum wrote for the group.

Villegas said Congress should instead fight for "more accountable and effective programs" and should change the law to "serve all victims of abuse," regardless of gender or sexual-orientation.

Well-heeled conservative activist groups, FreedomWorks and Heritage Action, have voiced similar opposition. Heritage Action considers the bill a "key vote" when issuing its conservative scorecard.

The payoff could be big for Republicans, political experts say.

"It can drag them back into the debate but it is also an easy opportunity and a way for them to symbolically show that they're trying to be more inclusive," Jennifer Lawless, director of the Women and Politics Institute at American University said of the Violence Against Women Act votes.

CNN's Kate Bolduan, Dan Merica and Matt Smith contributed to this report.

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