07-09-2020  11:34 pm   •   PDX and SEA Weather
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4

NORTHWEST NEWS

Oregon Appeals Court Affirms Portland Renter Relocation Law

The Court affirmed a Portland ordinance requiring landlords to pay tenants’ relocation fees if their rent is increased by at least 10% or if they’re evicted without cause.

Seattle Urged to See a 'World Without Law Enforcement'

Proposals include removal of 911 dispatch from Seattle Police control, budget cuts of 50%

Oregon DOJ to Hold Listening Sessions on Institutional Racism; Leaders Wary

DOJ will hold 11 virtual listening sessions for underserved Oregonians.

Portland Black Community Frustrated as Violence Mars Protests

Black leaders condemn violence from small group of mostly-white activists as Rose City Justice suspends nightly marches

NEWS BRIEFS

OSU Science Pub Focuses on Influence of Black Lives Matter

The influence of the Black Lives Matter movement will be the focus of a virtual Oregon State University Science Pub on July 13 ...

Capital Rx Establishes Scholarship at Howard University to Support Next Generation of Pharmacists

“Each of us has a role to play in paving a more equitable path for the future of the industry,” said AJ Loiacono, Founder and CEO...

Adams Joins Lawmakers in Move to Repeal Trump’s Birth Control Rule

Without action, SCOTUS decision clears way for Trump Admin rule to take effect ...

Portland Art Museum and Northwest Film Center Announce Artist Fund

The fund will help support artists during COVID crisis and beyond ...

The OHS Museum Reopens Saturday, July 11

The Oregon Historical Society museum will reopen with new hours and new safety protocols ...

Police: Transgender person assaulted, robbed in Wilsonville

PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) — Wilsonville police say three teenagers assaulted a transgender 20-year-old and stole their phone.Police said the victim told officers that while walking along the river Tuesday near Boones Ferry Park, they crossed paths with three male teens, one of whom called the...

Portland: 3rd class-action suit over police use of force

PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) — Another class-action lawsuit has been filed against the city of Portland, marking the third such lawsuit filed related to the use of force and munitions at protests that began after the police killing of George Floyd. The class-action complaint filed this week named...

Iowa defensive back Jack Koerner hurt in jet ski accident

IOWA CITY, Iowa (AP) — Iowa defensive back Jack Koerner sustained serious injuries when he and a passenger on a jet ski collided with a boat on the Lake of the Ozarks in Missouri.According to a police report, Koerner and Cole Coffin were hurt at about 6:30 p.m. Friday when their watercraft...

Missouri football program pushes again for racial justice

COLUMBIA, Mo. (AP) — Ryan Walters had just arrived at the University of Missouri to coach safeties for the football program when a series of protests related to racial injustice led to the resignations of the system president and the chancellor of its flagship campus.The student-led movement...

OPINION

Recent Protests Show Need For More Government Collective Bargaining Transparency

Since taxpayers are ultimately responsible for funding government union contract agreements, they should be allowed to monitor the negotiation process ...

The Language of Vote Suppression

A specific kind of narrative framing is used to justify voter suppression methods and to cover up the racism that motivates their use. ...

Letter to the Community From Eckhart Tolle Foundation

The Eckhart Tolle Foundation is donating more than 250,000 dollars to organizations that are fighting racism ...

Editorial From the Publisher: Vote as Your Life Depends on It

The Republican-controlled Senate won’t pass the George Floyd Justice in Policing Act, no matter how hard Oregon’s senators and others work to push for change. ...

AFRICAN AMERICANS IN THE NEWS

Syracuse University appoints diversity director for sports

Syracuse athletic director John Wildhack has added a position to his department, bucking a trend toward athletic cuts during the coronavirus pandemic. Salatha T. Willis was named associate athletic director for diversity, culture and climate this week. He is charged with developing and implementing...

Tapping into crime fears, GOP conflates mayhem with protests

WASHINGTON (AP) — For FRIDAY PMsApocalyptic images of blazing buildings and window-smashing protesters pop up on the TV screen as a caller to a 911 emergency line reaches voicemail. The computer offers to take reports of rapes, murders or home invasions, adding, “Our estimated wait...

Homeland Security gets new role under Trump monument order

PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) — Protesters who have clashed with authorities in the Pacific Northwest are not just confronting local police. Some are also facing off against federal officers whose presence reflects President Donald Trump's decision to make cracking down on “violent...

ENTERTAINMENT

Family re-imagines Bob Marley classic for COVID-19 relief

NEW YORK (AP) — Bob Marley’s Grammy-winning children and chart-topping grandson have re-imagined one of his biggest hits to assist children affected by the coronavirus pandemic.Stephen Marley, Cedella Marley and her son, Skip Marley, have joined forces to produce a new version of...

Asian American girls saw pivotal icon in 'Baby-Sitters Club'

Author Ann M. Martin had no master plan when she decided to make one of the core members of “The Baby-Sitters Club” a Japanese American girl named Claudia.Claudia Kishi happened to be everything the “model minority” stereotype wasn't. She got bad grades. She thrived in...

Police: Pop Smoke's social media led killers to LA home

LOS ANGELES (AP) — Authorities believe rising rapper Pop Smoke was shot and killed during a Los Angeles home-invasion robbery in February after his social media posts led five suspects to the house he was renting, police said after detectives arrested the group Thursday morning.Los Angeles...

U.S. & WORLD NEWS

Brazil LGBTQ group hides from virus in Copacabana building

RIO DE JANEIRO (AP) — In a courtyard a few blocks from Rio de Janeiro’s Copacabana beach, a dozen...

Authorities search for 'Glee' star believed to have drowned

Authorities planned Friday to renew the search for “Glee” star Naya Rivera, who is believed to have...

Ex-Trump lawyer Michael Cohen back in federal prison

NEW YORK (AP) — President Donald Trump’s former personal lawyer and fixer, Michael Cohen, was...

Japan braces for more heavy rain as death toll rises to 66

TOKYO (AP) — Parts of Japan still searching for missing people and evacuating those stranded by deadly...

Singaporeans vote in polls expected to return ruling party

SINGAPORE (AP) — Wearing masks and plastic gloves, Singaporeans began voting Friday in a general election...

Seoul mayor left note saying 'sorry' as South Korea mourns

SEOUL, South Korea (AP) — Seoul's mayor left a note saying he felt “sorry to all people”...

McMenamins
Nasir Habib and Jethro Mullen CNN

ISLAMABAD (CNN) -- The Pakistani government came under attack from two angles Tuesday as the Supreme Court ordered the arrest of the country's prime minister and a rowdy anti-government rally took place near the national parliament.

Even by the standards of Pakistan's often turbulent politics, it was a stormy day that ratcheted tensions ahead of national elections later this year.

The Supreme Court, which has clashed repeatedly with Pakistan's political leaders in recent years, issued the arrest order for Prime Minister Raja Pervez Ashraf and a number of other officials over allegations of illegal payments for electricity-generating projects when Ashraf was minister for water and power.

Speaking on local broadcaster Dunya News, Fawad Chaudhry, one of Ashraf's advisers, called the court's decision "a soft coup" against democracy. The prime minister has consistently denied the allegations, he said.

Last year, the Supreme Court ousted Ashraf's predecessor, Yousuf Raza Gilani, in a contempt case related to old corruption charges against President Asif Ali Zardari.

The Karachi Stock Exchange crashed Tuesday on the news of the Supreme Court action. The KSE shed 500 points in just 10 minutes.

The arrest order for Ashraf was music to the ears of supporters of Tahir ul Qadri, a Muslim cleric who wants Pakistan's leaders thrown out in favor of a caretaker government to bring about electoral reform and flush out corruption.

The demonstrators welcomed the court decision, chanting, "Long live the Supreme Court."

Just ahead of the court's announcement, Qadri, housed in a bulletproof container, addressed thousands of people gathered near the parliament in central Islamabad, singling out the judiciary and the military as the only two institutions that he said were functioning in Pakistan.

He had previously called on the civilian government to disband by Tuesday morning to allow the formation of the caretaker government. That deadline has passed, and he has urged his supporters to continue their demonstration in central Islamabad and to double their numbers each day.

Claims of a conspiracy

The timing of the arrest order against Ashraf appeared to play to Qadri's advantage.

A senior official of the governing Pakistan People's Party, which is headed by Zardari, called the court's decision "a conspiracy."

Speaking on Dunya News, Sharjeel Memon suggested the order had "a direct connection" with Qadri's movement.

Corruption is widely considered a chronic problem in Pakistan's political system; Zardari has served prison time on corruption charges.

And during his time as minister of water and power, Ashraf is accused of accepting kickbacks from power companies to approve expensive projects, known as Rental Power Projects, that in reality generated very little electricity.

Pakistan regularly grapples with chronic power outages, with its booming population putting a strain on the public power grid. So the government had to rely on private power producers.

Ashraf is alleged to have used the kickback from these private firms to buy property abroad. The accusations earned him the derisive nickname "Rental Raja," and the Supreme Court eventually stripped him of his former ministerial role.

If authorities follow through on the court's order and arrest Ashraf, he will remain prime minister for the time being, said Salman Akram Raja, a constitutional expert.

"The court hasn't convicted him; he is an accused at this stage," he said in an interview on local broadcaster Geo News.

The political drama set off by the Supreme Court followed unrest in Islamabad's streets earlier Tuesday.

Brief clashes took place between security forces and Qadri's supporters as the crowd moved into the area near the parliament where protests regularly take place.

Local media reported that police fired shots into the air and lobbed tear gas at the crowd. The unrest subsided after 10 to 15 minutes, and the protesters continued peacefully.

Qadri's supporters accused police of starting the unrest by trying to arrest the cleric, but Interior Minister Rehman Malik said police were doing their best to protect Qadri and control the crowd. He said the reported clashes are under investigation.

Footage from local broadcaster Ary News showed chaotic scenes of people running and objects being thrown as gunshots echoed in the background.

'The beginning of the revolution'

Qadri had already held a nighttime rally around 2 a.m. Tuesday after he and his convoy of followers arrived in Islamabad on Monday after traveling for more than a day from the eastern city of Lahore.

"It's the beginning of the revolution," he said, referring to Zardari as "ex-president" and to Ashraf as "ex-prime minister."

But the group's numbers fell far short of what organizers of the "Million Man March" had predicted, with witnesses estimating that about 20,000 people took part.

Malik, who visited rally sites Monday by helicopter, said the turnout numbers showed that Qadri's event had "badly failed."

Qadri had promised a Pakistani equivalent of Egypt's Tahrir Square protests.

After eight years in Canada, Qadri returned last month to Pakistan, where he is waging a campaign against the political elite. He has called for a caretaker administration to replace the current government and to carry out election reforms.

His suggestion that the judiciary and the military weigh in on the composition of the interim government has raised concerns in a country where military leaders have repeatedly seized power and ruled for long periods of time.

Some Pakistanis, noting that Qadri served as a lawmaker in the early 2000s, when Gen. Pervez Musharraf was leading the country, have suggested he may be working on behalf of the military.

Qadri denies those allegations and maintains he is simply seeking to ensure a corruption-free electoral process.

The current government and opposition have rejected his requests for a caretaker administration, insisting that nothing will stand in the way of timely elections and the democratic process.

"We will not succumb to these illegal demands," Malik said last week.

If this year's elections take place without major difficulties, it would represent the first time in Pakistan's history that a civilian government made it through a five-year term.

CNN's Nasir Habib reported from Islamabad, and Jethro Mullen wrote from Hong Kong. CNN's Shaan Khan in Islamabad contributed to this report.

 

image of Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19)
Port of Seattle Police We Want to Hear
Calendar

Photo Gallery

Photos and slide shows of local events

burgerville allies
The Skanner Photo Archives