11-13-2019  4:53 pm   •   PDX Weather    •   SEA weather  
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NORTHWEST NEWS

GOP Mailer to Oregon Voters Mimics US Census Form

The mailers are labeled "2019 Congressional District Census" and solicit donations to Trump's campaign. Voters are reminded that official U.S. Census Bureau surveys will never ask respondents for money.

Veterans Day: Honoring Those Who Serve and Continue to Serve

On this Veterans Day, the staff at The Skanner News honors all who have served and continue to serve in our nation's armed forces

FBI Reports Cybercrimes are Rising Because of Sophisticated Scams

Oregon man offers warning after he was scammed into giving away his family's life savings to criminals

Worker Who Yelled Racist Slurs at Black Customer Gets Jail

Audio and video showed a disturbing scene, said Deputy District Attorney Nicole Hermann

NEWS BRIEFS

Noose Found at Oregon Health & Science University

Surveillance cameras did not capture the area; investigator are reviewing who had access ...

DEQ Extends Air Quality Advisory Due to Stagnation

DEQ expects the air quality advisory to last until at least Tuesday, Nov. 12 ...

Forest Service Waives Fees in Honor of Veterans Day

The USDA Forest Service will waive fees at day-use recreation sites in Oregon and Washington on Monday, Nov. 11 in honor of Veterans...

Two Local Nonprofits Announced as Grant Recipients for Portland-Area Programs

Financial Beginnings Oregon and Portland Parks Foundation will receive a total of 0,000 plus leadership resources through Bank of...

State Seeks Volunteers to Rank Investments in Washington’s Outdoors

The Washington State Recreation and Conservation Office is recruiting 50 volunteers to evaluate grant proposals for parks, boating...

College Football Picks: Auburn at center of all down stretch

Over the next three weeks, Auburn will be in the middle of the action even though the Tigers are outside the playoff race.No. 13 Auburn plays two top-five playoff contenders in No. 5 Georgia (No. 4 CFP) and No. 4 Alabama (No. 5 CFP) at home in November, and depending upon how the Tigers do their...

No. 11 Florida looks for different outcome against Missouri

GAINESVILLE, Fla. (AP) — Florida linebacker David Reese insists things will be different against Missouri this week.He believes his team's preparation, focus, effort and intensity will change — along with the outcome. It's imperative if the Gators are going to make it to a New Year's...

OPINION

5 Ways Life Would be Better if it Were Always Daylight Saving Time

A Professor from the University of Washington says DST saves lives and energy and prevents crime ...

Importance of Educators of Color for Black and Brown Students

A new report examines the ways that school leaders of color’s experiences and perspectives influence how they build school culture ...

Atatiana Jefferson, Killed by Police Officer in Her Own Home

Atatiana Jefferson, a biology graduate who worked in the pharmaceutical industry and was contemplating becoming a doctor, lived a life of purpose that mattered ...

“Hell No!” That Is My Message to Those Who Would Divide Us 

Upon release from the South African jail, Nelson Mandela told UAW Local 600 members “It is you who have made the United States of America a superpower, a leader of the world" ...

AFRICAN AMERICANS IN THE NEWS

College Football Picks: Auburn at center of all down stretch

Over the next three weeks, Auburn will be in the middle of the action even though the Tigers are outside the playoff race.No. 13 Auburn plays two top-five playoff contenders in No. 5 Georgia (No. 4 CFP) and No. 4 Alabama (No. 5 CFP) at home in November, and depending upon how the Tigers do their...

No. 11 Florida looks for different outcome against Missouri

GAINESVILLE, Fla. (AP) — Florida linebacker David Reese insists things will be different against Missouri this week.He believes his team's preparation, focus, effort and intensity will change — along with the outcome. It's imperative if the Gators are going to make it to a New Year's...

Junkyard Dawgs: No. 5 Georgia's stellar D a team effort

ATHENS, Ga. (AP) — Kirby Smart has coached some stellar defenses.This might be one of his best.Never mind the lack of star power."They've got some of those same traits as the good defenses I've been able to be around," the Georgia coach said Monday. "But this group probably doesn't have that...

ENTERTAINMENT

With success and offers, Sterling K. Brown learns to say no

NEW YORK (AP) — With a hit TV series, awards, plus film and TV opportunities, Sterling K. Brown admits he’s experienced “a lot of pinch me moments” in recent years. But, with all those possibilities and offers, the 43-year-old has also learned a very important...

Justices could return cable TV race bias suit to lower court

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court seems likely to overturn a lower court ruling in favor of an African-American media mogul and comedian who’s suing cable giant Comcast for racial discrimination.The justices appeared to be in broad agreement Wednesday that an appeals court applied...

Maren Morris is set to have an epic night at the CMA Awards

Maren Morris is walking to the 2019 Country Music Association Awards with a lot of feelings.As the most-nominated act at an event for a music genre dominated by its male performers, Morris has become one of the key female faces of country music. She will pay tribute to her producer busbee, who died...

U.S. & WORLD NEWS

As rockets rain down, Israel intensifies its strikes in Gaza

GAZA CITY, Gaza Strip (AP) — Israeli aircraft struck Islamic Jihad targets throughout the Gaza Strip on...

Bishop who investigated sex abuse accused of sex abuse

NEW YORK (AP) — A Roman Catholic bishop named by Pope Francis to investigate the church’s response...

Clashes rock Bolivia as new interim leader challenged

LA PAZ, Bolivia (AP) — Renewed clashes rocked Bolivia’s capital on Wednesday as the woman who...

As rockets rain down, Israel intensifies its strikes in Gaza

GAZA CITY, Gaza Strip (AP) — Israeli aircraft struck Islamic Jihad targets throughout the Gaza Strip on...

Bishop who investigated sex abuse accused of sex abuse

NEW YORK (AP) — A Roman Catholic bishop named by Pope Francis to investigate the church’s response...

Clashes rock Bolivia as new interim leader challenged

LA PAZ, Bolivia (AP) — Renewed clashes rocked Bolivia’s capital on Wednesday as the woman who...

McMenamins
Matt Smith CNN

(CNN) -- Two decades of satellite readings back up what dramatic pictures have suggested in recent years: The mile-thick ice sheets that cover Greenland and most of Antarctica are melting at a faster rate in a warming world.

That's the conclusion of an international network of scientists who released their review of one of the biggest question marks in climate science Thursday.

The net loss of billions of tons of ice a year added about 11 millimeters -- seven-sixteenths of an inch -- to global average sea levels between 1992 and 2011, about 20 percent of the increase during that time, those researchers reported.

While that's a small number, "Small changes in sea levels in certain places mean very big changes in the kind of protection of infrastructure that you need to have in place," said Erik Ivins, a geophysicist at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in California and one of the contributors to Thursday's study.


Long-term climate change fueled by a buildup of atmospheric carbon emissions is a controversial notion politically, but it's one accepted as fact by most scientists. Previous estimates of how much the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets contributed to the current 3 millimeter-per-year rise in sea levels have varied widely, and the 2007 report of the United Nations' Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change left the question open.

While the 19-year average worked out to about 20 percent of the rise of the oceans, "for recent years it goes up to about 30 or 40 percent," said Michiel van den Broeke, a professor of polar meteorology at Utrecht University in the Netherlands. The rest comes from thermal expansion -- warmer water takes up more space.

The research released Thursday was backed by the European Union, NASA, the National Science Foundation and research councils in Britain and the Netherlands, with the findings published in this week's edition of the peer-reviewed journal Science. The project involved 47 scientists who compared readings from various satellite-based methods, including radar and laser readings and measurements of the minute gravitational changes around the ice sheets.

They concluded that Greenland and two of the three ice sheets that cover Antarctica have lost an estimated 237 billion metric tons, give or take a few billion, in the past 19 years. The ice sheet that covers eastern Antarctica grew, but only by about 14 billion tons -- not nearly enough to offset the losses from the layer that covers the western portion of the continent and the Antarctic Peninsula.

"Antarctica is losing mass, but it's not losing as much mass as many of the reports had suggested," Ivins said. "Greenland, on the other hand, is losing more mass today than it was in 1990 by a factor of five."

Don't panic: At the current rate, it would take between 3,000 and 7,000 years for those regions to become ice-free, said Ian Joughin, a glaciologist at the University of Washington.

"But we can see that the trend is towards increases, and that that's something we do need to worry about," Joughin said. "And that if we really want to have meaningful information that, you know, planners can use to build seawalls and things, there's going to have to be a big push to improve our projections of sea level rise using models."

In July, researchers watched as a stretch of unusually warm temperatures melted nearly the entire surface of the Greenland ice sheet.

The study's lead author, Andrew Shepherd of Britain's University of Leeds, said the results are the clearest evidence that the ice sheets are losing ground and are intended to be the benchmark for climate scientists to use for future calculations.

"Any model that someone would use to predict sea level rise is only really as good as the data that goes into it," Shepherd said. "And the fact that our data is twice or three times as reliable as the most recent overarching assessment has to give some weight to improving the value of those model predictions in the future."

Gavin Schmidt, a NASA climatologist who was not part of the study, said the data collected could be used to fine-tune computer models of future climate change. But he said scientists need to learn more about the physics and mechanics of the ice sheets before developing effective projections of what effect they'll have on continued sea-level rise.

"Right now, all of that is very complicated stuff, and we're not at the point where all of that is integrated into the models we have now," Schmidt said.

The findings were published as representatives of U.N. member states are gathered in Qatar in hopes of hammering out a successor to the Kyoto Protocol, the 1997 pact aimed at reining in carbon emissions. That pact committed developing nations to reduce emissions with a goal of limiting the rise of global average temperatures to 2 degrees C (3.6 F) by 2100.

But global emissions have gone up by about 50 percent since Kyoto, the World Meteorological Organization reported last week. The pact largely exempted developing nations like China and India, now the No. 1 and No. 3 emitters. The No. 2 producer -- the United States -- never ratified Kyoto.

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