10-21-2021  12:59 pm   •   PDX and SEA Weather
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NORTHWEST NEWS

Tool for Police Reform Rarely Used by Local Prosecutors

Brady Lists flag officers whose credibility is in question due to misconduct – a designation that must be shared with defense attorneys. Defense attorneys, public defenders, civil rights groups and some prosecutors are calling for an increased use of the lists.

Portland Parks & Recreation’s Interstate Firehouse Cultural Center (IFCC) Proposed as a Center for Black Arts and Culture

Feasibility Study for community-led vision moving forward thanks to Parks Local Option Levy

Oregon Housing and Community Services Makes Progress on Federal Emergency Rental Assistance

Agency stresses importance of applying for the program and works with partners to prevent evictions from moving forward 

Oregon Set to Expand Hotline for Bias Crime Reporting

With a rise in hate crimes and bias incidents in Oregon and nationwide the two-person office just couldn’t handle the volume.

NEWS BRIEFS

Bootcamp for Prep Cooks Supplies Ingredients for Entry Into Food Service Career

Individuals interested in starting a career in food service have an exciting new choice – Prep Cook Bootcamp ...

WA BLM Demands Resignation of Criminally-charged Sheriff Troyer

"He is being charged with two crimes: false reporting and making a false statement when he said that newspaper deliverer Sedrick...

'A Dangerous Time': Portland Sees Record Homicides

Unlike previous years, more bystanders are being caught in the crossfire — from people mourning at vigils and sitting in cars to...

State Agency Inadvertently Releases Employees Vaccine Status

Oregon’s central administrative agency inadvertently released the COVID-19 vaccination status of more than 40,000 state employees to...

Simple Safety Tips for Trick-or-Treating After Fauci Greenlighted Halloween 2021

Halloween 2020 brought creative ways to trick or treat while minimizing the spread of infection (

FBI: 1 person found dead after standoff at Portland home

PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) — The FBI say sone person was found dead in a Portland, Oregon, home Thursday morning after a standoff. The Oregonian/OregonLive reports the FBI says it was unclear how the person died. No law enforcement agencies used force during the standoff in Northeast...

Farmer fined 4K over alleged water theft during drought

RICHLAND, Wash. (AP) — A farm in southeastern Washington has been fined 4,000 by the Washington state Department of Ecology for irrigating 250 acres (101 hectares) without rights to the water. Frank Tiegs LLC in Franklin County has 30 days to appeal the decision to the...

No. 21 Texas A&M runs over Missouri, 35-14

COLUMBIA, Mo. (AP) — Texas A&M coach Jimbo Fisher warned his team all week that it couldn’t afford a letdown after its upset of top-ranked Alabama. His message got through, as the 21st-ranked Aggies buried Missouri early in a 35-14 victory Saturday. “We preached it,...

No. 21 Texas A&M heads to Mizzou after 'Bama upset win

No. 21 Texas A&M (4-2, 1-2 SEC) at Missouri (3-3, 0-2), Saturday at noon EDT (SEC Network). Line: Texas A&M by 9 1/2, according to FanDuel Sportsbook. Series record: Texas A&M leads 8-7. WHAT’S AT STAKE? ...

OPINION

Letter to the Publisher: Black Publishers Shed Light on Pending Litigation Against NNPA

NNPA members Carole Geary, Dorothy R. Leavell and Amelia Ashley-Ward provide an update on pending litigation against the organization, its CEO and its former Treasurer. ...

How Food Became the Perfect Beachhead for Gentrification

What could be the downside of fresh veggies, homemade empanadas and a pop-up restaurant specializing in banh mis? ...

Homelessness, Houselessness in the Richest Country in the World: An Uncommon Logic

When and why did the United States of America chose the wealth of a few over the health, wealth, and well-being of so many ...

American Business Leaders Step Up to Fight Inequities in the South

With COVID-19 still an omnipresent concern and the country’s recovery still very much in jeopardy, individuals, families, and communities are struggling to deal with issues that have only been exacerbated by the pandemic. ...

AFRICAN AMERICANS IN THE NEWS

Memorial service in honor of Colin Powell set for Nov. 5

WASHINGTON (AP) — A memorial service for Colin L. Powell, the retired Army general and former secretary of state who died on Monday, will be held Nov. 5 at Washington National Cathedral, a spokeswoman said Thursday. “There will be very limited seating and it will be by...

Biden bill would put US back on path of reducing uninsured

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Democrats’ social spending and climate change bill would put the United States back on a path to reducing its persistent pool of uninsured people, with estimates ranging from 4 million to 7 million Americans gaining health coverage. Those getting...

Australia, UK defend AUKUS pact, say fears overhyped

KUALA LUMPUR, Malaysia (AP) — Australia and Britain on Thursday defended their nuclear submarine deal with the U.S. amid concerns it could escalate tensions in the region and spark an arms race. U.K. Minister for Armed Forces James Heappey said there “has been a lot of...

ENTERTAINMENT

Review: ‘Harder They Fall’ updates the Western, with style

These. People. Existed. Those three words — and that very emphatic punctuation — appear onscreen at the beginning of “The Harder They Fall,” setting a definitive tone for this stylish and bold new Western by Jeymes Samuel. Yes, Samuel is saying, his...

Gwyneth Paltrow tackles bedroom taboos in Netflix series

NEW YORK (AP) — Gwyneth Paltrow admits she has insecurities about her physical appearance in an episode of her new Netflix series “ Sex, Love & goop,” but she’s working on that. The Oscar-winner and entrepreneur behind the goop beauty and wellness brand opens up in the six-episode...

Chapelle special spurs Netflix walkout; 'Trans lives matter'

LOS ANGELES (AP) — Netflix employees who walked out Wednesday in protest of Dave Chappelle's special and its anti-transgender comments were joined by allies who chanted “Trans lives matter,” getting pushback from counterprotesters who also showed up. A pre-noon rally at a...

U.S. & WORLD NEWS

Billions in environmental justice funds hang in the balance

Tens of billions of dollars for U.S. environmental justice initiatives originally proposed in a .5 trillion...

Biden ties legislative agenda to MLK push for racial justice

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden on Thursday tied his legislative priorities on voting rights, police...

Trump plan for new media venture gets investors' thumbs up

NEW YORK (AP) — Some investors aren’t waiting to see if former President Donald Trump’s plans for a media...

Year after Nigeria's deadly protests, police still accused

LAGOS, Nigeria (AP) — Joshua Samuel painfully recalls the day, one year ago, when Nigerian soldiers opened fire...

Putin says new pipeline could quickly pump more gas to EU

MOSCOW (AP) — Russian President Vladimir Putin said Thursday that Russia could quickly boost natural gas...

World's biggest triceratops sells for .7 million in Paris

PARIS (AP) — The world’s biggest triceratops skeleton, known as “Big John,” was sold for 6.6 million euros...

Matt Smith CNN

(CNN) -- Two decades of satellite readings back up what dramatic pictures have suggested in recent years: The mile-thick ice sheets that cover Greenland and most of Antarctica are melting at a faster rate in a warming world.

That's the conclusion of an international network of scientists who released their review of one of the biggest question marks in climate science Thursday.

The net loss of billions of tons of ice a year added about 11 millimeters -- seven-sixteenths of an inch -- to global average sea levels between 1992 and 2011, about 20 percent of the increase during that time, those researchers reported.

While that's a small number, "Small changes in sea levels in certain places mean very big changes in the kind of protection of infrastructure that you need to have in place," said Erik Ivins, a geophysicist at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in California and one of the contributors to Thursday's study.


Long-term climate change fueled by a buildup of atmospheric carbon emissions is a controversial notion politically, but it's one accepted as fact by most scientists. Previous estimates of how much the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets contributed to the current 3 millimeter-per-year rise in sea levels have varied widely, and the 2007 report of the United Nations' Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change left the question open.

While the 19-year average worked out to about 20 percent of the rise of the oceans, "for recent years it goes up to about 30 or 40 percent," said Michiel van den Broeke, a professor of polar meteorology at Utrecht University in the Netherlands. The rest comes from thermal expansion -- warmer water takes up more space.

The research released Thursday was backed by the European Union, NASA, the National Science Foundation and research councils in Britain and the Netherlands, with the findings published in this week's edition of the peer-reviewed journal Science. The project involved 47 scientists who compared readings from various satellite-based methods, including radar and laser readings and measurements of the minute gravitational changes around the ice sheets.

They concluded that Greenland and two of the three ice sheets that cover Antarctica have lost an estimated 237 billion metric tons, give or take a few billion, in the past 19 years. The ice sheet that covers eastern Antarctica grew, but only by about 14 billion tons -- not nearly enough to offset the losses from the layer that covers the western portion of the continent and the Antarctic Peninsula.

"Antarctica is losing mass, but it's not losing as much mass as many of the reports had suggested," Ivins said. "Greenland, on the other hand, is losing more mass today than it was in 1990 by a factor of five."

Don't panic: At the current rate, it would take between 3,000 and 7,000 years for those regions to become ice-free, said Ian Joughin, a glaciologist at the University of Washington.

"But we can see that the trend is towards increases, and that that's something we do need to worry about," Joughin said. "And that if we really want to have meaningful information that, you know, planners can use to build seawalls and things, there's going to have to be a big push to improve our projections of sea level rise using models."

In July, researchers watched as a stretch of unusually warm temperatures melted nearly the entire surface of the Greenland ice sheet.

The study's lead author, Andrew Shepherd of Britain's University of Leeds, said the results are the clearest evidence that the ice sheets are losing ground and are intended to be the benchmark for climate scientists to use for future calculations.

"Any model that someone would use to predict sea level rise is only really as good as the data that goes into it," Shepherd said. "And the fact that our data is twice or three times as reliable as the most recent overarching assessment has to give some weight to improving the value of those model predictions in the future."

Gavin Schmidt, a NASA climatologist who was not part of the study, said the data collected could be used to fine-tune computer models of future climate change. But he said scientists need to learn more about the physics and mechanics of the ice sheets before developing effective projections of what effect they'll have on continued sea-level rise.

"Right now, all of that is very complicated stuff, and we're not at the point where all of that is integrated into the models we have now," Schmidt said.

The findings were published as representatives of U.N. member states are gathered in Qatar in hopes of hammering out a successor to the Kyoto Protocol, the 1997 pact aimed at reining in carbon emissions. That pact committed developing nations to reduce emissions with a goal of limiting the rise of global average temperatures to 2 degrees C (3.6 F) by 2100.

But global emissions have gone up by about 50 percent since Kyoto, the World Meteorological Organization reported last week. The pact largely exempted developing nations like China and India, now the No. 1 and No. 3 emitters. The No. 2 producer -- the United States -- never ratified Kyoto.

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