06-02-2020  7:06 pm   •   PDX and SEA Weather
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NORTHWEST NEWS

Portland, Oregon, Remains Largely Peaceful, Curfew Lifted

Portland will not impose a curfew on Tuesday night for the first time in four days

Inslee Orders Statewide Guard Activation Following Unrest

Inslee had previously authorized 400 troops for Seattle and 200 troops for Bellevue.

Mayor Ted Wheeler Asks Governor to Call Up National Guard

Portland police chief said, “It has been a long, difficult and emotional several days in Portland and across the country and we understand why.”

Governor Brown Announces $30 Million Investment to Protect Agricultural Workers

The funds are intended to secure Oregon's food supply chain and support agricultural workers during the COVID-19 health crisis

NEWS BRIEFS

Oregon Health Authority Investigating COVID-19 Increase at Unnamed Business

Oregon reports 71 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases today, no new deaths ...

Some Columbia River Gorge Trails, Parks Reopen Today

Crowded sites including most waterfall viewing areas, campgrounds, and visitor’s centers will stay closed because of the coronavirus...

Over 60 Percent of U.S. Households Have Responded to 2020 Census

Washington is one of the 6 states with the highest self-response rates and both Seattle and Portland are one of the top 8 cities with...

Federal Court Rules Florida Law That Undermined Voting Rights Restoration Is Unconstitutional

The law required people with past convictions to pay all outstanding legal fees, costs, fines, and restitution before regaining their...

The Latest: Thousands on New York City streets after curfew

The Latest on the May 25 death in Minneapolis of George Floyd, a handcuffed black man who pleaded for air as a white police officer pressed a knee on his neck:TOP OF THE HOUR:— Thousands of protesters on New York City streets after curfew.— Protest in Washington on Tuesday lacking...

Seattle mayor, police chief vow to review protest tactics

SEATTLE (AP) — Seattle's mayor and police chief promised a large crowd of protesters Tuesday to review the department's use of pepper spray and flash-bang grenades to break up a crowd of peaceful protesters the night before, encouraging them to keep marching as long as they do not do...

Kansas, Missouri renew Border War with 4-game football set

KANSAS CITY, Mo. (AP) — Kansas and Missouri are resuming their bitter Border War in football after the former Big 12 rivals agreed to a four-game series in which each school will play two home games beginning in September 2025.The fourth-longest rivalry in college football dates to 1891, but...

OPINION

Mayor Ted Wheeler: Portland and the Path Forward

Portland Mayor Ted Wheeler invites Portlanders, as public servants, to join him "in insisting that we never return to business as usual." ...

Local Business Leaders Share Messages of Hope

President, CEO of SAIF says each of us must move forward in "our understanding of the problem, in holding ourselves accountable for our own attitudes and biases, and in coming together, not apart." ...

Time to Stop Messing Around and Strike at the Root of Police Violence

Thomas Knapp says the root of police violence is the creation of "police forces" as state institutions separate from the populace and dedicated to suppressing that populace on command ...

A Letter to George Floyd: (Posthumous)

As Black mothers, so often we say, our Black boys across this nation belong to all of us. ...

AFRICAN AMERICANS IN THE NEWS

The Latest: Thousands on New York City streets after curfew

The Latest on the May 25 death in Minneapolis of George Floyd, a handcuffed black man who pleaded for air as a white police officer pressed a knee on his neck:TOP OF THE HOUR:— Thousands of protesters on New York City streets after curfew.— Protest in Washington on Tuesday lacking...

China reports 4 new coronavirus cases, withdraws 5 others

The Latest on the coronavirus pandemic. COVID-19 causes mild or moderate symptoms for most people. For some, especially older adults and people with existing health problems, it can cause more severe illness or death.BEIJING — China on Wednesday reported reported four new confirmed...

Protesters return to the streets as Trump decries 'lowlifes'

WASHINGTON (AP) — Undeterred by curfews, protesters streamed back into the nation's streets Tuesday, hours after President Donald Trump pressed governors to put down the violence set off by George Floyd's death and demanded that New York call up the National Guard to stop the...

ENTERTAINMENT

Trump as thug or hero? Depends on what network you watch

NEW YORK (AP) — It was a split screen for the ages on MSNBC Monday: on the left side, President Donald Trump talking about restoring law and order. On the right, a tear-gassed young woman vomiting in a Washington street.For a nation rubbed raw following a traumatic weekend, cable television...

Books on race and criminal justice top bestseller lists

NEW YORK (AP) — As nationwide protests against racism and police violence continue, readers are seeking out books old and new on race and criminal justice. Robin Diangelo's “White Fragility," Michelle Alexander's "The New Jim Crow" and Bryan Stevenson's “Just Mercy” were...

'Just Mercy,' drama of racial injustice, to be free in June

NEW YORK (AP) — The 2019 film “Just Mercy,” which chronicles courtroom struggles against racial injustice and mass incarceration, will be made free on digital platforms throughout June in the wake of George Floyd's death, Warner Bros. said Tuesday. In the film, Michael B....

U.S. & WORLD NEWS

Washington man has some surprise guests: about 60 protesters

WASHINGTON (AP) — Rahul Dubey had some unexpected guests Monday night — about 60 in all — as...

Zuckerberg still under fire over inflammatory Trump posts

OAKLAND, Calif. (AP) — Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg isn’t budging over his refusal to take action on...

Curfews give sweeping powers to cops, but are often flouted

COLUMBIA, S.C. (AP) — Hundreds of cities have imposed curfews to keep the peace during a week of violent...

Hong Kong leader criticizes 'double standards' over protests

HONG KONG (AP) — Hong Kong's leader on Tuesday criticized the “double standards” of foreign...

Putin signs Russia's nuclear deterrent policy

MOSCOW (AP) — President Vladimir Putin on Tuesday endorsed Russia's nuclear deterrent policy which allows...

Experts watch as Rio de Janeiro economy starts to reopen

RIO DE JANEIRO (AP) — Rio de Janeiro, one of the cities worst hit by COVID-19 in Brazil, slowly started to...

McMenamins
Matt Smith CNN

(CNN) -- Two decades of satellite readings back up what dramatic pictures have suggested in recent years: The mile-thick ice sheets that cover Greenland and most of Antarctica are melting at a faster rate in a warming world.

That's the conclusion of an international network of scientists who released their review of one of the biggest question marks in climate science Thursday.

The net loss of billions of tons of ice a year added about 11 millimeters -- seven-sixteenths of an inch -- to global average sea levels between 1992 and 2011, about 20 percent of the increase during that time, those researchers reported.

While that's a small number, "Small changes in sea levels in certain places mean very big changes in the kind of protection of infrastructure that you need to have in place," said Erik Ivins, a geophysicist at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in California and one of the contributors to Thursday's study.


Long-term climate change fueled by a buildup of atmospheric carbon emissions is a controversial notion politically, but it's one accepted as fact by most scientists. Previous estimates of how much the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets contributed to the current 3 millimeter-per-year rise in sea levels have varied widely, and the 2007 report of the United Nations' Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change left the question open.

While the 19-year average worked out to about 20 percent of the rise of the oceans, "for recent years it goes up to about 30 or 40 percent," said Michiel van den Broeke, a professor of polar meteorology at Utrecht University in the Netherlands. The rest comes from thermal expansion -- warmer water takes up more space.

The research released Thursday was backed by the European Union, NASA, the National Science Foundation and research councils in Britain and the Netherlands, with the findings published in this week's edition of the peer-reviewed journal Science. The project involved 47 scientists who compared readings from various satellite-based methods, including radar and laser readings and measurements of the minute gravitational changes around the ice sheets.

They concluded that Greenland and two of the three ice sheets that cover Antarctica have lost an estimated 237 billion metric tons, give or take a few billion, in the past 19 years. The ice sheet that covers eastern Antarctica grew, but only by about 14 billion tons -- not nearly enough to offset the losses from the layer that covers the western portion of the continent and the Antarctic Peninsula.

"Antarctica is losing mass, but it's not losing as much mass as many of the reports had suggested," Ivins said. "Greenland, on the other hand, is losing more mass today than it was in 1990 by a factor of five."

Don't panic: At the current rate, it would take between 3,000 and 7,000 years for those regions to become ice-free, said Ian Joughin, a glaciologist at the University of Washington.

"But we can see that the trend is towards increases, and that that's something we do need to worry about," Joughin said. "And that if we really want to have meaningful information that, you know, planners can use to build seawalls and things, there's going to have to be a big push to improve our projections of sea level rise using models."

In July, researchers watched as a stretch of unusually warm temperatures melted nearly the entire surface of the Greenland ice sheet.

The study's lead author, Andrew Shepherd of Britain's University of Leeds, said the results are the clearest evidence that the ice sheets are losing ground and are intended to be the benchmark for climate scientists to use for future calculations.

"Any model that someone would use to predict sea level rise is only really as good as the data that goes into it," Shepherd said. "And the fact that our data is twice or three times as reliable as the most recent overarching assessment has to give some weight to improving the value of those model predictions in the future."

Gavin Schmidt, a NASA climatologist who was not part of the study, said the data collected could be used to fine-tune computer models of future climate change. But he said scientists need to learn more about the physics and mechanics of the ice sheets before developing effective projections of what effect they'll have on continued sea-level rise.

"Right now, all of that is very complicated stuff, and we're not at the point where all of that is integrated into the models we have now," Schmidt said.

The findings were published as representatives of U.N. member states are gathered in Qatar in hopes of hammering out a successor to the Kyoto Protocol, the 1997 pact aimed at reining in carbon emissions. That pact committed developing nations to reduce emissions with a goal of limiting the rise of global average temperatures to 2 degrees C (3.6 F) by 2100.

But global emissions have gone up by about 50 percent since Kyoto, the World Meteorological Organization reported last week. The pact largely exempted developing nations like China and India, now the No. 1 and No. 3 emitters. The No. 2 producer -- the United States -- never ratified Kyoto.

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