06-25-2022  12:16 pm   •   PDX and SEA Weather
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NORTHWEST NEWS

Abortion Remains Legal, Accessible in Oregon in Wake of Supreme Court Ruling

Decision has no effect on Oregon’s Reproductive Health Equity Act that guarantees right to receive abortion, health care providers’ right to provide it

Black Man Police Killed in Clackamas County ID'd, Police Say He Had Gun

The shooting is being investigated by the Oregon City and Lake Oswego police departments.

WA, OR Leaders Skeptical About Pausing Gas Taxes

President Joe Biden on Wednesday urged Congress to suspend federal gasoline and diesel taxes for three months and urged states to do the same at the local level.

Mother-Daughter Mental Health Professionals Launch Organization for Black Professional Women

Mo Better Wellness, Connection, and Facilitation will offer wellness events and consulting.

NEWS BRIEFS

Increased Emergency Snap Benefits Continue in July

Approximately 422,000 households will receive an estimated million in extra food benefits ...

Opacity of Performance: Takahiro Yamamoto Opens at PAM

The Portland Art Museum marks a return to live art inside its galleries with a dance installation by Takahiro Yamamoto, the museum’s...

Portland's First Black Book Festival Launches on Juneteenth Weekend

She’s bringing together the community through books! ...

Juneteenth Events

Juneteenth Oregon Celebration was founded 50 years ago by the late and beloved community leader Clara Peoples. View Juneteenth events...

Portland Public Schools Expands Weapons Ban

The action follows a bill the Oregon Legislature passed earlier this year giving schools the ability to prohibit concealed carry...

Inslee seeks abortion rights amendment to state constitution

OLYMPIA, Wash. (AP) — Washington Gov. Jay Inslee said he will push for a state constitutional amendment to protect abortion rights within his state's borders, as well as laws that will make it difficult for other states to investigate whether their own residents have visited Washington for...

Authorities warn Northwest swimmers to beware risky waters

SALEM, Ore. (AP) — Authorities are warning recreationists to be wary of risky waterways as hot weather hits part of the Pacific Northwest. The National Weather Service issued a heat advisory for most of northwest Oregon and southwest Washington state through Sunday, the...

OPINION

Quenn Tiye’s Kitchen

Centuries of indoctrination have ingrained into the minds of white and Black Americans that any aspect of Africanness is negative. ...

The Plan for Transforming Public Safety and Policing in the U.S.

Rising crime leaves communities feeling unsafe, however, police violence and killings of unarmed civilians demonstrate that pouring more money into more-of-the-same policing is not the answer. ...

What Is Afrofuturism? An English Professor Explains

Chambliss defines Afrofuturism as an intersection of speculation and liberation that’s inspired by the concerns of people of African descent. ...

Reflections on the Massacre of the Buffalo 10 & Racism

Former NY state senator and Buffalo native knew many of the people killed ...

AFRICAN AMERICANS IN THE NEWS

Religious schools may face another hurdle to state tuition

AUGUSTA, Maine (AP) — Religious schools got what they wanted when the Supreme Court allowed them to participate in a state tuition program. But the state attorney general said the ruling will be for naught unless the schools are willing to abide by the same antidiscrimination law as...

To some defenders, gun ruling could right a racial wrong

NEW YORK (AP) — When the U.S. Supreme Court struck down New York's tight restrictions on who can carry a handgun, condemnation erupted from liberal leaders and activists. But some public defenders, often allies of progressive activists, praised the court's ruling, saying...

'Total bloodbath': Witnesses describe Ethiopia ethnic attack

NAIROBI, Kenya (AP) — The heavily armed men appeared around the small farming village in Ethiopia’s Oromia region, frightening residents already on edge after recent clashes between government troops and rebels. “The militants assured us that they will not touch us. They said...

ENTERTAINMENT

Review: Austin Butler, Baz Luhrmann deliver a grand ‘Elvis’

The brief life of Elvis Presley is not something that fits neatly into a conventional biopic formula, though many have tried. It was, perhaps, always going to take a director as wild and visionary as Baz Luhrmann to do something that evokes the essence of the King’s 42 years. Luhrmann knows...

John Williams, 90, steps away from film, but not music

NEW YORK (AP) — After more than six decades of making bicycles soar, sending panicked swimmers to the shore and other spellbinding close encounters, John Williams is putting the final notes on what may be his last film score. “At the moment I’m working on ‘Indiana Jones 5,’...

Director James Burrows looks back on his career in new book

NEW YORK (AP) — James Burrows loves sitcoms, and he should. The 81-year-old has directed more than 1,000 episodes of TV sitcoms, including fan favorites such as “Friends,” “Cheers,” and Will & Grace." He's also directed the pilot episodes for “Frasier,” “Two and a Half Men,”...

U.S. & WORLD NEWS

A roof over their head: Churches use tiny homes for homeless

Churches across the U.S. are tackling the big question of how to address homelessness in their communities with a...

Iran and EU say Vienna nuke talks will resume in coming days

TEHRAN, Iran (AP) — The European Union and Iran agreed on Saturday to resume negotiations in Vienna in the...

Dems hope to harness outrage, sadness after abortion ruling

YARDLEY, Pa. (AP) — The shock quickly turned to sadness for Victoria Lowe. The 37-year-old...

French lawmakers want abortion rights in constitution

PARIS (AP) — A group of lawmakers belonging to French President Emmanuel Macron's party will propose a bill to...

Mass same-sex wedding in Mexico challenges discrimination

MEXICO CITY (AP) — Even after five years of living together in the Pacific resort city of Acapulco, something as...

Turkish president: Sweden hasn't alleviated NATO concerns

ISTANBUL (AP) — Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan has told Sweden's prime minister that he has not seen any...

CNN Wire Staff

(CNN) -- The U.S. Supreme Court has denied an appeal by Chevron to block an $18 billion judgment against it in an Ecuadorian court.

The high court gave no explanation behind its decision not to consider the appeal from the oil giant.

The case, Chevron Corp v. Naranjo et al, stems from a 2011 injunction against enforcement of any judgments against the company related to lawsuits in Ecuador. A judge initially granted the injunction, but in January of this year an appeals court reversed the lower court's finding, removing the injunction.

What the Supreme Court announced on Tuesday was that it would not consider Chevron's appeal to reinstate the injunction.

An Ecuadorian court had ruled that Chevron must pay $8.6 billion in damages relating to a pollution lawsuit, an amount that increased to $18 billion because Chevron did not apologize.

In Ecuador, Chevron has appealed to the country's National Court, and in the United States it sought to reinstate the injunction against enforcement of the Ecuadorian ruling.

Chevron noted the Supreme Court ruling was not based on the merits of the case, and does not undo findings by another court that "fraud and bias have tainted the Ecuadorian proceedings and judgment."

"While Chevron is disappointed that the court denied the petition, Chevron will continue to defend against the plaintiffs' lawyers' attempts to enforce the fraudulent Ecuadorian judgment," the company said on a blog it devotes to the case.

Chevron's legal fight in Ecuador involves litigation that goes back 19 years between residents of Ecuador's Amazon region and Texaco, which was later purchased by Chevron.

The pollution case stems from claims that the company had a detrimental impact on Amazonian communities where it operated.

The company alleges that reports and evidence against it were fraudulent, and that bribes and corruption led to the original decision against it.

That case, Aguinda v. ChevronTexaco, was originally filed in New York in 1993 on behalf of 30,000 inhabitants of Ecuador's Amazon region. The suit was eventually transferred to the Ecuadorian court and Ecuadorian jurisdiction.

The lawsuit alleges that Texaco used a variety of substandard production practices in Ecuador that resulted in pollution that decimated several indigenous groups in the area, according to a fact sheet provided by the Amazon Defense Coalition.

According to the group, Texaco dumped more than 18 billion gallons of toxic waste into Amazon waterways, abandoned more than 900 waste pits, burned millions of cubic meters of gases with no controls and spilled more than 17 million gallons of oil due to pipeline ruptures.

Cancer and other health problems were reported at higher rates in the area, the group says.

Chevron says Texaco was partnered with an Ecuadorian oil company when it operated in Ecuador, and that it spent $40 million on remediation efforts to clean up roughly one-third of the sites in which it worked -- an amount reflective of its 37% share of the oil-producing consortium with Petroecuador.

It says its cleanup efforts were certified and approved by the Ecuadorian government and blames Petroecuador for any ongoing pollution at sites where it was the sole operator, according to documents on the Chevron website regarding the lawsuit and its history of operations in the South American country.

 

Jan. 6 Committe Hearings - Day 5

The next hearing will be held sometime in July; an exact date has not yet been announced.

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