08-16-2022  6:47 pm   •   PDX and SEA Weather
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4

NORTHWEST NEWS

Basic Guaranteed Income Program to Launch for Black Portlanders

Brown Hope’s Black Resilience Fund argues the impact of direct cash payments. 

Oregon Justice Fires Panel Due to Lack of Public Defenders

Criminal defendants in Oregon who have gone without legal representation due to a shortage of public defenders filed a lawsuit in May that alleges the state is violating their constitutional right to legal counsel and a speedy trial.

River Chief Imprisoned for Fishing Fights for Sacred Rights

Wilbur Slockish Jr. has been shot at, had rocks hurled at him. He hid underground for months, and then spent 20 months serving time in federal prisons across the country — all of that for fishing in the Columbia River.

Starbucks Asks Labor Board to Halt Union Votes Temporarily

A store in Overland Park, Kansas is one of 314 U.S. Starbucks locations where workers have petitioned the NLRB to hold union elections since late last year. More than 220 of those stores have voted to unionize.

NEWS BRIEFS

Measure on Portland Government to Appear as-Is on Ballot

Politicians, business leaders and civic activists have called for reshaping Portland’s form of government, which they say...

The Regional Arts & Culture Council Rolls Out New Grant Program

The Arts3C grant program is designed to be fully responsive to what artists and art makers in the community need funding to support ...

OHA Introduces New Monkeypox (hMPXV) Website

As of Aug. 10, 95 people have tested positive for monkeypox in Oregon ...

Wyden, Colleagues Renew Request for FDA to Address Concerns about Dangerous Pulse Oximeter Inaccuracies Affecting Communities of Color

“There are decades of research showing inaccurate results when pulse oximeters are used to monitor people of color” ...

Inslee Issues Directive Outlining Monkeypox Virus Response

As of Friday, Washington state had confirmed 265 monkeypox cases. ...

After firing public defense commissioners, new members named

PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) — The day after Oregon Supreme Court Chief Justice Martha Walters fired all nine members of the state commission that oversees public defense, she said Tuesday that she was appointing four new commissioners and reappointing five commissioners from the previous group. ...

Names of 3 killed in collision along Oregon Coast released

LINCOLN CITY, Ore. (AP) — The three people killed in a head-on vehicle collision on Highway 101 near Lincoln City have been identified. Claude Segerson, 69, Matthew Phillips, 31, and Christopher Padilla, 30, all of the Oregon town of Otis, died Monday, Oregon State Police said. ...

Mizzou full of optimism with new QB, defensive coordinator

COLUMBIA, Mo. (AP) — Missouri coach Eli Drinkwitz is on his third defensive coordinator in three years at Missouri, and the Tigers are about to start their fifth different quarterback in the season opener in the last five years. Sounds like a program that should be on shaky ground. ...

Hoosiers looking for a turnaround after dismal 2021 season

Indiana linebacker Cam Jones and quarterback Jack Tuttle took matters into their own hands this offseason. They called their teammates together to discuss the goals and aspirations of the program, the need to always play with an edge and to break down precisely why things went wrong...

OPINION

No One Ever Told You About Black August?

Black America lives in a series of deserts. Many of us live in food deserts, financial deserts, employment deserts, and most of us live in information deserts. ...

Betsy Johnson Fails to Condemn Confederate Flags at Her Rally

The majority of Oregonians, including our rural communities, value inclusion and unity, not racism and bigotry. ...

Monkeypox, Covid, and Your Vote

We must start a voter registration drive right here where we live. This effort must become as important to us as putting food on the table and a roof over our heads. ...

Speaking of Reparations

To many Americans, “reparations” is a dirty word when applied to Black folks. ...

AFRICAN AMERICANS IN THE NEWS

California appeals court rejects COVID-19 fines for church

A California church that defied safety regulations during the COVID-19 pandemic by holding large religious services won't have to pay about 0,000 in fines, a state appeals court ruled. Calvary Chapel San Jose and its pastors were held in contempt of court and fined in 2020 and 2021...

R Kelly jury picked in child pornography, trial-fixing case

CHICAGO (AP) — A federal jury was impaneled Tuesday in R. Kelly's hometown of Chicago to decide multiple charges against the R&B singer, as prosecutors and defense attorneys argued toward the end of the process about whether the government was improperly attempting to keep some Blacks from...

Lawsuit: Mississippi police 'terrorized' small town

JACKSON, Miss (AP) — Police have “terrorized” Black residents in a small Mississippi town by subjecting them to false arrests, excessive force and intimidation, according to a federal lawsuit filed Tuesday by a civil rights organization. The organization, JULIAN, is seeking a...

ENTERTAINMENT

Mark Hoffman out as CNBC chief, KC Sullivan replacing him

NEW YORK (AP) — Veteran CNBC chief Mark Hoffman is leaving the network after 28 years, with London-based executive KC Sullivan replacing him early next month, the network said on Tuesday. Hoffman was named president of the financial news network in 2005 and elevated to chairman in...

Fox News gets into movies with story from romance novelist

NEW YORK (AP) — Fox News is getting into the movies by producing its first feature film, an adaptation of “The Shell Collector” from romance novelist Nancy Naigle. The movie, which debuts Sept. 1, is the first of four films planned over the next year on the Fox Nation streaming...

Long-hidden synagogue mural gets rehabbed, relocated

BURLINGTON, Vt. (AP) — A mural that was painted in a Vermont synagogue more than 100 years ago by a Lithuanian immigrant — and hidden behind a wall for years— has been termed a rare piece of art and has been painstakingly moved and restored. The large colorful...

U.S. & WORLD NEWS

Afghanistan marks 1 year since Taliban seizure as woes mount

KABUL, Afghanistan (AP) — The Taliban on Monday marked a year since they seized the Afghan capital in a rapid...

Putin blasts US 'hegemony,' predicts end to 'unipolar' world

MOSCOW (AP) — Russian President Vladimir Putin accused the United States of trying to encourage extended...

DHS watchdog rebuffs lawmakers on Secret Service testimony

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Homeland Security Department’s inspector general has refused congressional requests for...

Putin blasts US 'hegemony,' predicts end to 'unipolar' world

MOSCOW (AP) — Russian President Vladimir Putin accused the United States of trying to encourage extended...

Palestinian President Abbas skirts apology for Munich attack

BERLIN (AP) — Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas expressed no regret Tuesday for the deadly attack by...

South African miners mark 10th anniversary of killings

MARIKANA, South Africa (AP) — A somber gathering of about 5,000 people marked the 10th anniversary of what has...

Shaan Khan and Jethro Mullen CNN

ISLAMABAD, Pakistan (CNN) -- About 35 American activists dressed in pink are expected to take part in a demonstration Friday in Islamabad against U.S. drone strikes that target militants in Pakistan.

The U.S. protesters, from the anti-war group Code Pink, are visiting Pakistan to make contact with people affected by the drone strikes and draw the attention of the American public to the situation in areas where the attacks take place.

"We are here to say, on behalf of those Americans with a conscience, that we apologize to the people of Pakistan for the killing and suffering" caused by the drones, Medea Benjamin, one of the founders of Code Pink, said at a news conference Thursday in Islamabad.

Organized in conjunction with a British advocacy group, the rally Friday is scheduled to take place in one of the Pakistani capital's busiest market places. The protesters say they plan to wear bright pink clothes, carry banners and recite anti-drone chants.

The drone strike program in Pakistan has long been controversial, with conflicting reports on its impact from the U.S. government, Pakistani officials and independent organizations.

American officials insist that the choice and execution of the strikes -- begun under former President George W. Bush and ramped up under President Barack Obama -- meet strict standards and that cases of civilian deaths or injuries are extremely rare.

But a study released last month by Stanford Law School and New York University's School of Law said the drone attacks had killed far more people than the United States acknowledges, traumatized innocent residents and been largely ineffective. Civilians account for a significant portion of those killed, the study said.

The drone program is deeply unpopular in Pakistan, where the national parliament voted in April to end any authorization for it.

Code Pink's demonstration Friday in Islamabad is the precursor to a bigger, more ambitious protest over drone strikes in which the group plans to participate over the weekend.

The activists say they hope to join cricket-star-turned-politician Imran Khan and his party, Pakistan Tehreek-e-Insaf, in a march to South Waziristan, part of Pakistan's ungoverned tribal region along the Afghanistan border where drone strikes are frequent.

But the activists say they are unsure if the Pakistani government will allow them to take part in the march to the restive region.

The neighboring district, North Waziristan, is widely believed to be the headquarters of the Haqqani network -- a militant group Washington has long accused of fueling some of the deadliest attacks against NATO troops in Afghanistan.

If the authorities prevent them from participating in the march to South Waziristan, the Code Pink activists say they will invite people from the area affected by the drone strikes to join them in a large gathering in Islamabad.

They say they are also considering the possibility of a hunger strike outside the U.S. Embassy in the capital.

Code Pink says on its website that the broader goal of its Pakistan trip is to "stop the drone strikes and get compensation for the families of civilians killed by the strikes." It has held meetings in Islamabad this week with victims of the strikes and U.S. officials.

The women-led organization became known for antiwar demonstrations in Washington during the U.S. buildup in Iraq. The group has held protests over a range of different international issues.

Code Pink has regularly disrupted high-profile congressional hearings dealing with war and national defense issues, as well as interrupting speeches by foreign officials like Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu of Israel.

Among the activists with the Code Pink delegation in Pakistan at the moment is Ann Wright, a former U.S. Army colonel and State Department official who quit her post to protest the U.S. invasion of Iraq.

In an appearance this week on the Pakistani television station Geo TV, Wright said that U.S. drone strikes are a violation of Pakistan's sovereignty and are fueling anti-American sentiment in the region.

When the Pakistani television host asked Wright to respond to accusations that she was a radical activist, she said jokingly, "I'm a radical peace activist."

CNN's Shaan Khan reported from Islamabad, and Jethro Mullen from Hong Kong. CNN's Reza Sayah contributed to this report.

Photo Gallery

Photos and slide shows of local events