02-16-2020  11:03 pm   •   PDX Weather    •   SEA weather  
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NORTHWEST NEWS

Trump Appointees Weigh Plan to Build Pipeline in Oregon

If the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission approves the project, which lacks state permits, it would likely set up a court battle over state's rights

Oregon Lawmakers Ask U.S. Attorney to Investigate Whether Local Police Violated Black Man’s Civil Rights

U.S. Sens. Ron Wyden and Jeff Merkley and U.S. Rep. Earl Blumenauer said this racial targeting of Michael Fesser "reflects the worst abuses of African-Americans in our nation’s modern history"

DA to Investigate West Linn Cops Handling of Wrongful Arrest

Former West Linn Police Chief Terry Timeus had his officers initiate an unwarranted, racially motivated surveillance and arrest of a Black Portland man as a favor to the chief’s fishing buddy

State and Local Leaders Push Back Against Fair Housing Changes

Trump administration proposes weakened regulation, tracking of housing discrimination

NEWS BRIEFS

Seattle Pacific University Hosts Music Events

Seattle Pacific University invites the public to a series of free music events during the months of February and March ...

A Celebration of Portland’s Role in the Negro Leagues to be Held Thursday, Feb. 20

The community is invited for a celebration of Black History Month and the 100th anniversary of Negro League Baseball in America ...

Kresge Foundation Selects PCC To Participate in Its National Boost Initiative

The $495,000 grant awarded to PCC and Albina Head Start will help connect low-income residents and students to services and...

Attorney Jamila Taylor Announces Run for State House of Representatives in Washington

Taylor pledges to continue outgoing Rep. Pellicciotti’s commitment to open, accountable government in a statement released today ...

Legislation Introduced to Prohibit Irresponsible Government Use of Facial Recognition Technology

The technology heightens the risk of over-surveillance and over-policing, especially in communities of color ...

Jury decides convicted Oregon meth dealer should lose home

PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) — A Yamhill County jury has concluded that police can seize the home of a woman convicted of a felony drug crime under Oregon’s civil forfeiture law.Sheryl Sublet, 62, pleaded guilty in 2018 to to selling less than 1,000 grams of methamphetamine, The...

Police seek suspect who robbed 3 Portland banks in 1 hour

PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) — A man robbed three Portland banks in less than one hour last week, according to the Portland Police Bureau.The robberies occurred Friday, The Oregonian/Oregon Live reported.The man wore glasses, a black beanie and flannel shirt.He robbed the Bank of the West on...

OPINION

Black America is Facing a Housing Crisis

As the cost of housing soars the homeless population jumps 12 percent, the number of people renting grows and homeownership falls ...

Trump Expands Muslim Ban to Target Africans

Under the new ban on countries, four out of five people who will be excluded are Africans ...

Martin Luther King Day is an Opportunity for Service

Find out where you can volunteer and make a difference to the community ...

Looking to 2020 — Put Your Vote to WORK!

Ronald Reagan, who turned his back on organized labor and started America’s middle-class into a tailspin, has recently been voted by this administration’s NLRB into the Labor Hall of Fame ...

AFRICAN AMERICANS IN THE NEWS

Rival Democrats accuse Bloomberg of trying to 'buy' election

CARSON CITY, Nev. (AP) — With the Nevada caucuses less than a week away, Democratic presidential candidates campaigning this weekend were fixated on a rival who wasn't contesting the state. Bernie Sanders, Joe Biden, Amy Klobuchar, Elizabeth Warren and Pete Buttigieg all targeted...

Teammates appear to stop Marega leaving after racist abuse

LISBON, Portugal (AP) — FC Porto striker Moussa Marega, who tried to walk off the field after being the target of racist abuse from fans, faced apparent attempts Sunday by his own teammates and opposition players to prevent him from leaving. Marega, who is black and plays for Mali, was...

The Latest: Nevada's lieutenant governor endorses Biden

LAS VEGAS (AP) — The Latest on the 2020 presidential campaign (all times PST):3:30 p.m.Joe Biden has picked up another endorsement from a top Nevada politician, with Lt. Gov. Kate Marshall announcing that she will back the former vice president’s White House bid.Marshall joins two of...

ENTERTAINMENT

Snoop Dogg apologizes to Gayle King for rant over Bryant

NEW YORK (AP) — After days of blistering criticism, Snoop Dogg has finally apologized to Gayle King for attacking her over her interview with former basketball star Lisa Leslie about the late Kobe Bryant.“Two wrongs don't make no right. when you're wrong, you gotta fix it," he said in...

Voigt shocked paper ran her photo with Freni's obituary

Deborah Voigt was in California earlier this week when she got a text from a friend on the East Coast."So sorry to hear the news of your passing," read the Monday message.The Gazzetta di Parma newspaper in Italy had run an obituary of Mirella Freni, the great Italian soprano who died Sunday at age...

Lizzo talks diversity, self-confidence and femininity

MEXICO CITY (AP) — Fresh from winning three Grammys, singer Lizzo visited Mexico City for a private concert, surprising her fans with acoustic versions of her hits and a toast with tequila.The star from Detroit, who won best pop solo performance (“Truth Hurts”), best...

U.S. & WORLD NEWS

Father Josh: A married Catholic priest in a celibate world

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Rains postpones Daytona 500, dampening event, Trump's visit

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All-Star weekend, as expected, was about honoring Kobe

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Banksy's Valentine's Day mural covered after it was defaced

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Boyfriend of British TV presenter heartbroken by her death

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UN: Antarctic high temp records will take months to verify

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McMenamins
Chelsea J. Carter and Joe Sterling CNN


Moammar Gadhafi
 

(CNN) -- An alleged new case of waterboarding emerged in a massive report Thursday detailing brutal CIA interrogations of Libyan detainees last decade before they were handed over to Moammar Gadhafi's regime.

Mohammed al-Shoroeiya "provided detailed and credible testimony that he was waterboarded on repeated occasions during U.S. interrogations in Afghanistan," Human Rights Watch said in a 200-plus page report.



The allegations directly challenge long-standing claims by President George W. Bush and his administration that only three terror suspects, none of whom were Libyan, were waterboarded during interrogations.

Human rights groups consider waterboarding -- in which a prisoner is restrained and water poured over his mouth and nose to produce the sensation of drowning -- a form of torture.

"While never using the phrase 'waterboarding,' he said that after his captors put a hood over his head and strapped him onto a wooden board, "then they start with the water pouring. ... They start to pour water to the point where you feel like you are suffocating." He added that, 'they wouldn't stop until they got some kind of answer from me,' " the report said, citing al-Shoroeiya.

Laura Pitter, a counterterrorism adviser for Human Rights Watch and the author of the report, said abuses occurred in U.S.-run facilities in Afghanistan between April 2003 and April 2005. She said waterboarding occurred in 2003 but it is not clear if it occurred afterward.

The rights group's accusations also come a week after the U.S. Justice Department closed a criminal investigation without charges into the deaths of two terror suspects in CIA custody.

CIA spokeswoman Jennifer Youngblood said she couldn't comment on the report's "specific allegations" but said the CIA has been on record about "three substantiated cases in which detainees were subjected to the waterboarding technique."

"The Department of Justice has exhaustively reviewed the treatment of more than 100 detainees in the post-9/11 period -- including allegations involving unauthorized interrogation techniques -- and it declined prosecution in every case," she said.

Among those who officials have acknowledged were subjected to waterboarding was Khalid Sheikh Mohammed, described as the principal architect of the September 11 terrorist attacks.

The Justice Department did not immediately respond to a request by CNN for comment on the allegations.

CNN is unable to independently corroborate the claims by Human Rights Watch.

The report cites repeated allegations of torture by the detainees while in the custody of the United States and other countries: being chained to a wall naked, forced into cramped positions, restrained in painful positions for long periods and undergoing repeated beatings. Al-Shoroeiya and another detainee, Khalid al-Sharif, also underwent water torture similar to waterboarding, the report said.

"The scope of Bush administration abuse appears far broader than previously acknowledged and underscores the importance of opening up a full-scale inquiry into what happened," Pitter said.

Her report is titled "Delivered into Enemy Hands: US-Led Abuse and Rendition of Opponents to (Gadhafi's) Libya."

The report also largely relies on Human Rights Watch interviews with former detainees, many of whom claim to have been members of the Libyan Islamic Fighting Group, which was working to overthrow Gadhafi in the early 1980s.

It cites accounts of 14 former detainees and what it describes as "recently uncovered CIA and UK Secret Service documents" found in the sacked offices of Libya's former intelligence chief as proof of the torture and mistreatment.

"The interviews and documents establish that, following the September 11, 2001 attacks, the U.S., with aid from the United Kingdom and countries in the Middle East, Africa, and Asia arrested and held without charge a number" of LIFG members, Human Rights Watch said.

They were "rendered" to Libya, mostly between 2004 and 2006, when "the United States and the United Kingdom were trying to transform" Gadhafi "from foe to ally" during their rapprochement with the dictator.

Most members of the LIFG had fled Libya by the end of the 1980s and set up operations in Afghanistan. A number of the detainees were picked up in Afghanistan, according to the report.

Detainees claimed to have been turned over to Gadhafi and then jailed. Some of the detainees claimed torture at the hands of Gadhafi's jailers, while other said they were not mistreated.

"All interviewees said their captors forcibly returned them to Libya at a time when Libya's record on torture made clear they would face a serious risk of abuse upon return. All had expressed deep fears to their captors about going back to Libya and five of them said that they specifically asked for asylum," the report said.

Terror analysts say that by at least 2004, some members of the group had aligned themselves with al Qaeda, though many former members say the LIFG had nothing to do with the terror group. The United States classified the LIFG as a terror organization in late 2004.

Many of the detainees, according to the report, were freed during Libya's civil war and fought alongside the rebels.

"Some of those who were rendered and allegedly tortured in U.S. custody now hold key leadership and political positions in the country," the report said.

The documents were found by Human Rights Watch researchers on September 3, 2011, in the offices of former Libyan intelligence chief Moussa Koussa. In late August 2011, Tripoli fell to rebel forces that were backed by NATO. Gadhafi was captured and killed by rebels in October 2011.

One of the documents -- a fax -- offers to help Libya pay for an airplane to pick up a prisoner, while a communiqué from a British intelligence officer to Koussa offers congratulations to Libya over its jailing of another former detainee handed over by the UK.

"The report makes clear there's so much that we don't know about what happens in these places," Pitter said. "This is the tip of the iceberg."

She said the actions occurred during the Bush administration but are now the legacy of President Obama. She said the United States must make clear these actions should never happen again.

"The one thing we're hoping the report does make clear is it's important for the United States to look back and acknowledge mistakes were made," she said.

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