09-18-2020  6:44 pm   •   PDX and SEA Weather
Don't Call the Police for domestic disturbances
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NORTHWEST NEWS

US Judge Blocks Postal Service Changes That Slowed Mail

The Yakima, Washington judge called the changes “a politically motivated attack on the efficiency of the Postal Service” before the November election.

Black and Jewish Community Join to Revive Historic Partnership

United in Spirit Oregon brings together members of the NAACP, Jewish Federation of Greater Portland, others to serve as peacemakers 

Feds Explored Possibly Charging Portland Officials in Unrest

Federal officials were told that Portland police officers were explicitly told not to respond to the federal courthouse

Latest: Report: Downed Power Lines Sparked 13 Oregon Fires

As wildfires continue to burn in Oregon and the west, here are today's updates.

NEWS BRIEFS

Free Masks and Gloves Now Available for Small Businesses

Businesses with fewer than 50 employees that are headquartered in Oregon with principal operations in Oregon are eligible. ...

Forest Service Explains 'Containment'

US Forest Service, Riverside Fire provides a special update to explain how they achieve wildfire containment. ...

Oregon Receives Approval of Federal Disaster Declaration for Wildfires

Decision will enable federal aid to begin flowing, as unprecedented wildfires ravage state and force evacuation of thousands ...

National Black Farmers' Association President Calls for Boycott of John Deere

Year after year, John Deere has declined NBFA's invitation to display its equipment at the 116,000-member organization's annual...

City of Vancouver Welcomes New Fire Chief

Brennan Blue is replacing Vancouver Fire Chief Joe Molina, who is retiring after 28 years. ...

COVID-19 testing decrease due wildfires and poor air quality

SALEM, Ore. (AP) — The availability of coronavirus testing in Oregon decreased this week due to the massive wildfires and the hazardous air quality that stretched across the state. Despite this, officials said Friday that data continues to show a decline in the rate of COVID-19 transmission...

2-year-old accidentally run over, killed in Prineville

Prineville, Ore. (AP) — A toddler was killed Thursday when run over by a vehicle at a property in Prineville, according to the Crook County Sheriff’s Office.Sheriff’s office deputies, Crook County Fire and Rescue crew and Oregon State Police troopers responded at 5:58 p.m. and...

AP Top 25 Reality Check: When streaks end, but not really

For the first time since the end of the 2011 season, Ohio State is not ranked in the AP Top 25.The Buckeyes' streak of 132 straight poll appearances is the second-longest active streak in the country, behind Alabama's 198.Of course, in this strange season of COVID-19, Ohio State's streak was...

Potential impact transfers this season aren't limited to QBs

While most of the offseason chatter surrounding college football transfers inevitably focuses on quarterbacks, plenty of notable players at other positions also switched teams and could make major impacts for their new schools this fall.Miami may offer the clearest example of this.Quarterback...

OPINION

The Extraordinary BIPOC Coalition Support Measure 110

Coming together to change the systemic racism of the failed approach to drugs and addiction ...

One Huge Lie Crystallized

The Democrats have cast the President as a failed leader, but Trump’s supporters painted him as a success and the last line of defense against radical socialism. ...

“Losers”???!!!

I am hoping that millions of us will teach Trump what it means to be a loser on November 3rd. ...

AFRICAN AMERICANS IN THE NEWS

Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg dies at 87

WASHINGTON (AP) — Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, a diminutive yet towering women’s rights champion who became the court’s second female justice, died Friday at her home in Washington. She was 87.Ginsburg died of complications from metastatic pancreatic cancer, the...

Princeton faces federal inquiry after acknowledging racism

The Trump administration has opened an investigation into racial bias at Princeton University, saying that the school's recent acknowledgment of racism on campus amounts to a “shocking” and “serious” admission of discrimination.In a letter to the university on Wednesday,...

Fired, pro-Black Lives Matter officer sues to get job back

PHILADELPHIA (AP) — A former Philadelphia police officer who was cleared of charges that he falsified records is suing to get his job back, saying officials were retaliating for his support of Black Lives Matter.Bryan Turner, who is Black, sued the city and the Philadelphia Police Department...

ENTERTAINMENT

With picnic baskets, Christian Siriano puts on backyard show

WESTPORT, Conn. (AP) — Christian Siriano, who turned his atelier into a mask-making machine, took to his Connecticut backyard Thursday for a cozy fashion show complete with picnic baskets for his small in-person crowd, masks on the faces of his models and a dip in his pool for pregnant muse...

Emmys, live and virtual: 'What could possibly go wrong?'

LOS ANGELES (AP) — Emmy host Jimmy Kimmel and an alpaca sharing the spotlight. Winners accepting at home in designer pajamas or maybe yoga pants. More than 100 chances for a balky internet connection to bring Sunday’s ceremony to a crashing halt.Come for the awards, stay for the...

DJ Jazzy Jeff talks 'Fresh Prince' reunion, mansion rental

LOS ANGELES (AP) — DJ Jazzy Jeff knew “The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air” made a mark in television history after filming six seasons during the mid-'90s, but he thought the show’s popularity would eventually fizzle out at some point.So far, that hasn’t happened. The...

U.S. & WORLD NEWS

US bans WeChat, TikTok from app stores, threatens shutdowns

The U.S. Commerce Department said Friday it will ban Chinese-owned TikTok and WeChat from U.S. app stores on...

Stopgap bill to prevent shutdown held up over farm funding

WASHINGTON (AP) — Efforts to fashion a temporary spending bill needed to avert a government shutdown at the...

Hundreds of thousands still without power in Sally cleanup

LOXLEY, Ala. (AP) — Hundreds of thousands of people were still without power Friday along the Alabama coast...

Russian military says US flights near Crimea fuel tensions

MOSCOW (AP) — The Russian military on Friday accused the U.S. and its allies of provoking tensions in the...

Dutch bars to close early to rein in spread of coronavirus

THE HAGUE, Netherlands (AP) — Bars and cafes in the most densely populated regions of the Netherlands will...

'This is a big moment:' UK virus restrictions escalating

LONDON (AP) — Fresh nationwide lockdown restrictions in England appear to be on the cards soon as the...

Don't Call the Police for domestic disturbances
McMenamins
Josh Levs and Chelsea Carter CNN

(CNN) -- Hurricane Isaac weakened Wednesday morning but clung to hurricane strength as officials warned that the Gulf Coast will have to endure many more hours of pounding rain.

"For many people, it's not even half over," Richard Knabb, director of the National Hurricane Center, said Wednesday morning.

The heavy rain will persist "all day today, into tonight, into tomorrow," he said.



More than 150 calls came in to 911 from people wanting to be rescued, said Terry Rutherford, commander of authorities in Plaquemines Parish, Louisiana, which was experiencing a kind of flooding it did not see during Hurricane Katrina seven years ago.

Isaac could bring 14 inches of rain to the region, and as much as 20 inches are possible, the hurricane center said.

As of 10 a.m. CT (11 a.m. ET), Isaac's maximum sustained winds were at 75 miles per hour -- barely hurricane strength, which begins at 74 mph.

The storm was centered "very near" Houma, Louisiana, and about 45 miles southwest of New Orleans, the hurricane center said.

It continued to move northwest slowly, at only 6 mph, allowing for an extended, relentless lashing of much of the Gulf Coast.

The center of the storm "will move farther inland over Louisiana today and tomorrow, and over southern by Arkansas early Friday," the hurricane center said.

Forecasters predict Isaac will continue to weaken as it moves over land during the next 48 hours, but threats of dangerous storm surges and flooding will continue through Wednesday night, the hurricane center said.

Nearly 654,000 customers were without power in Arkansas, Louisiana, Mississippi and Alabama, according to the Entergy and Cleco power companies.

Hurricane-force winds extend up to 45 miles from the storm's center, and tropical storm-force winds extend up to 175 miles, the hurricane center said.

Three adults and an infant in Mississippi were rescued overnight from a houseboat, the state's emergency operations center said Wednesday.

Isaac "delivered more of a punch than originally thought," said Billy Nungesser, president of Plaquemines Parish in Louisiana, one of the worst-hit areas.

"We have reports of people on their roofs, in attics, in 12 to 14 feet of water," he said.

Some residents saved three people, including a woman who was on her roof, Nungesser said.

Those homes were on the east bank of a levee, but "this storm is going to kick around and deliver the same type of flow to the west bank," he said.

Emergency management officials reported the overtopping of an 18-mile stretch of the back levee in Plaquemines Parish from Braithwaite to White Ditch, which will "result in significant deep flooding in the area," the National Weather Service of New Orleans said.

The levee was not upgraded after Hurricane Katrina, which struck the region seven years ago Wednesday. That levee, according to the National Weather Service, is maintained by the parish and is not part of the federal hurricane protection levee system.

Katrina breached the levee in two places, the Army Corps of Engineers said.

Parish resident Gene Oddo told CNN affiliate WWL that he was in his attic with his wife and 18-month-old baby girl.

"The water came up so quick, it looks like we lost everything," he said. He and his wife have drinking water, baby food and other necessities, he said.

"I would rather be here to save what I can, because insurance doesn't cover all that much," Oddo said.

Oddo said the water was above his front door, and he did not expect it to reach the attic. But if it does, "I'm gonna have to shoot a hole in the attic to get up here on the roof."

His neighbors, including a 92-year-old man who refused to leave his home, were in a similar predicament, he said.

WWL later reported that parish deputies were fighting the wind and rain to get boats out to rescue people.

The New Orleans levee system and pump stations were working furiously to deal with the deluge. The system was rebuilt and reinforced at a cost of $14 billion after it failed when Katrina struck in 2005. Nearly 1,800 people died as a result of that storm, the majority when levees failed and flooded.

"People who went through Katrina are pretty nervous about storms, and large numbers of people have left," Lynn Magnuson, 58, said in a CNN iReport.

Magnuson said the Lower 9th Ward, which was hard hit by Katrina, "is pretty empty right now."

The National Weather Service warned early Wednesday that heavy rainfall across metropolitan New Orleans and nearby coastal communities will probably result in flash floods.

"There is no evidence of any (water) overtopping (canals)" in the city, New Orleans Mayor Mitch Landrieu said. "We have full confidence the levees will hold."

Even so, he and other officials were taking no chances.

"We're in a hunker-down phase now, because this storm could be over us for a while with a lot of wind and rain," Landrieu said.

"Hunker down means hunker down and prepare to ride it out."

The mayor tweeted that about 1,000 National Guard troops and more than 2,900 law enforcement officers are in the city ready to address issues related to the storm.

Plaquemines Parish was flooded in some areas that were not flooded by Katrina, said Nungesser, the parish president.

Isaac made its second landfall at about 2 a.m. CT near Port Fourchon, in southeast Louisiana 60 miles southeast of New Orleans, after slamming first into Plaquemines Parish along the coast and then wobbling back over the water near the mouth of the Mississippi River, the National Hurricane Center said in an early morning update.

The storm has caused significant surges and flooding, including in some places not directly in Isaac's path. Storm surges of 9.9 feet have been reported in Shell Beach, Louisiana, and 6.2 feet in Waveland, Mississippi, according to the hurricane center.

Forecasters predict water levels to rise between 6 and 12 feet on the coast in Mississippi and southeastern Louisiana alone.

In Biloxi, Mississippi, 50-year-old Alfonso Walker was keeping a close eye on the progress of the 195-mile-wide hurricane.

He watched as a storm surge sent waves crashing over the pier at the IP Biloxi Hotel & Casino.

"I went through Hurricane Camille in 1969 and Hurricane Katrina in 2005, where I lost everything, and every other hurricane in between those two that came through," he said in a CNN iReport.

"So I'm a little concerned."

Isaac, which was a tropical storm last week in the Atlantic Ocean, killed nearly two dozen people in Haiti and the Dominican Republic before starting its journey across the Gulf of Mexico.

On Tuesday, Isaac grew to a Category 1 hurricane. It is significantly weaker than Category 3 Katrina, though forecasters warn it is capable of causing significant flooding.

Isaac earlier prompted three airports to close -- in New Orleans; Gulfport-Biloxi, Mississippi; and Mobile, Alabama.

Mobile Regional Airport said Wednesday it was reopening runways and resuming some flights, and Pensacola International Airport announced it reopened in the morning, with the first flight landing at 10:01 a.m.

Major ports along the Gulf Coast and the Mississippi River from Baton Rouge to its mouth have been closed, according to the U.S. Coast Guard. Amtrak suspended train service to and from New Orleans on Wednesday, and area businesses have come to a standstill.

In Mississippi, more than 1,800 people were staying in 33 shelters in 16 counties, according to the state's emergency management agency.

The Nuclear Regulatory Commission said it sent additional inspectors to two Louisiana nuclear plants in the storm's path, as power company Entergy planned a "controlled shutdown" of one of them Tuesday afternoon.

CNN's Greg Botelho, Brian Todd, Soledad O'Brien, Ed Lavandera, Anika Chin, Mike Ahlers, Aaron Cooper and Ed Payne contributed to this report.

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