07-21-2024  9:21 pm   •   PDX and SEA Weather

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NORTHWEST NEWS

SneakerWeek 2024 Launches in Pioneer Courthouse Square July 26

The event brings together industry experts, BIPOC designers and sneaker enthusiasts.

Money From Washington's Landmark Climate Law Will Help Tribes Face Rising Seas, Climate Change

Tens of millions of dollars raised by a landmark climate law in Washington state will go to Native American tribes that are at risk from climate change and rising sea levels to help them move to higher ground, install solar panels, buy electric vehicles and restore wetlands. The Quinault Indian Tribe on the Olympic Peninsula is getting million to help relocate its two main villages to higher ground, away from the tsunami zone and persistent flooding.

The Top Draft Pick of the Mariners Pitches Lefty and Righty. Jurrangelo Cijntje Wants to Keep It Up

Cijntje threw right-handed to lefties more often in 2024 but said it was because of discomfort in his left side. The Mariners say they want Cijntje to decide how to proceed as a righty and/or lefty as a pro. He says he wants to continue pitching from both sides.

Wildfire Risk Rises as Western States Dry out Amid Ongoing Heat Wave Baking Most of the US

Blazes are burning in Oregon, where the governor issued an emergency authorization allowing additional firefighting resources to be deployed. More than 142 million people around the U.S. were under heat alerts Wednesday, especially across the West, where dozens of locations tied or broke heat records.

NEWS BRIEFS

Merkley, Senators Urge VA to Expand Access to Medical Cannabis for America’s Veterans

Senators’ letter follows DEA’s recommended rescheduling of cannabis from earlier this year ...

Federal Appeals Court Declines to Restore Voting Rights in Mississippi

Thousands of Mississippians Face “Especially Cruel” Disenfranchisement Scheme ...

Draft of Statewide Wildfire Hazard Map Mandated by Legislature Released

The Oregon Department of Forestry today released drafts of new statewide wildfire hazard and wildland-urban interface maps developed...

Southwest Washington's Lemonade Day Youth Entrepreneur of the Year Named by the Greater Vancouver Chamber

Tatum Talbert was recognized for her exceptional achievement and creativity in the GVC’s 2024 Lemonade Day program. ...

Oscar Arana Selected as NAYA's Permanent CEO

The NAYA Family Center Board of Directors selected Oscar Arana (Chichimeca) as the organization's...

Biden's decision to drop out leaves Democrats across the country relieved and looking toward future

HARPER WOODS, Mich. (AP) — After weeks of uncertainty about who would be at the top of the Democratic Party’s ticket in November, many voters expressed relief over the news that President Joe Biden would drop his reelection bid and began to think about who might replace him in a dramatically...

Seattle police officer fired over ‘vile’ comments after death of Indian woman

SEATTLE (AP) — A Seattle police officer has been fired for making callous remarks about the death of a graduate student from India after she was struck last year by another officer’s vehicle in a crosswalk. Seattle interim police Chief Sue Rahr fired Officer Daniel Auderer on...

Chiefs set deadline of 6 months to decide whether to renovate Arrowhead or build new — and where

ST. JOSEPH, Mo. (AP) — The Chiefs have set a deadline of six months from now to decide on a plan for the future of Arrowhead Stadium, whether that means renovating their iconic home or building an entirely new stadium in Kansas or Missouri. After a joint ballot initiative with the...

Missouri governor says new public aid plan in the works for Chiefs, Royals stadiums

JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. (AP) — Missouri Gov. Mike Parson said Thursday that he expects the state to put together an aid plan by the end of the year to try to keep the Kansas City Chiefs and Royals from being lured across state lines to new stadiums in Kansas. Missouri's renewed efforts...

OPINION

The 900-Page Guide to Snuffing Out American Democracy

What if there was a blueprint for a future presidential administration to unilaterally lay waste to our constitutional order and turn America from a democracy into an autocracy in one fell swoop? That is what one far-right think tank and its contributors...

SCOTUS Decision Seizes Power to Decide Federal Regulations: Hard-Fought Consumer Victories Now at Risk

For Black and Latino Americans, this power-grab by the court throws into doubt and potentially weakens current agency rules that sought to bring us closer to the nation’s promises of freedom and justice for all. In two particular areas – fair housing and...

Minding the Debate: What’s Happening to Our Brains During Election Season

The June 27 presidential debate is the real start of the election season, when more Americans start to pay attention. It’s when partisan rhetoric runs hot and emotions run high. It’s also a chance for us, as members of a democratic republic. How? By...

State of the Nation’s Housing 2024: The Cost of the American Dream Jumped 47 Percent Since 2020

Only 1 in 7 renters can afford homeownership, homelessness at an all-time high ...

AFRICAN AMERICANS IN THE NEWS

Harris could become first Black woman, first person of South Asian descent to be president

WASHINGTON (AP) — She's already broken barriers, and now Kamala Harris could shatter several more after President Joe Biden abruptly ended his reelection bid and endorsed her. Biden announced Sunday that he was stepping aside after a disastrous debate performance catalyzed fears...

In a California gold rush town, some Black families are fighting for land taken from their ancestors

COLOMA, Calif. (AP) — In a tiny town where the California gold rush began, Black families are seeking restitution for land that was taken from their ancestors to make way for a state park now frequented by fourth graders learning about the state's history. Their efforts in Coloma, a...

Legal fight continues with appeals over proposed immigration initiative for Arizona Nov. 5 ballot

PHOENIX (AP) — The fight to keep a proposed border initiative off Arizona’s Nov. 5 ballot is not over yet. Immigrant advocates kept the issue alive this week by filing notice to the state Supreme Court that they will appeal the judge’s ruling. A Maricopa County...

ENTERTAINMENT

On anniversary of Frida Kahlo's death, her art's spirituality keeps fans engaged around the globe

MEXICO CITY (AP) — Frida Kahlo had no religious affiliation. Why, then, did the Mexican artist depict several religious symbols in the paintings she produced until her death on July 13, 1954? “Frida conveyed the power of each individual,” said art researcher and curator Ximena...

Celebrity birthdays for the week of July 21-27

Celebrity birthdays for the week of July 21-27: July 21: Actor Leigh Lawson (“Tess”) is 81. Singer Yusuf Islam (Cat Stevens) is 76. Cartoonist Garry Trudeau (“Doonesbury”) is 76. Actor Jamey Sheridan (“Homeland”) is 73. Singer-guitarist Eric Bazilian of The Hooters is 71....

Canadian officer says Alice Munro claimed her daughter was lying about being abused by stepfather

TORONTO (AP) — A retired police detective involved in the arrest 20 years ago of the husband of Canadian Nobel laureate Alice Munro, said Friday he was disturbed by the writer's reaction 20 years ago when she learned her husband would be charged for sexually assaulting her daughter. ...

U.S. & WORLD NEWS

3,000 migrants leave southern Mexico on foot in a new caravan headed for the US border

CIUDAD HIDALGO, México (AP) — About 3,000 migrants from around a dozen countries left from Mexico’s southern...

Xander the Great! Schauffele wins the British Open for his 2nd major this year

TROON, Scotland (AP) — Xander Schauffele went from the most nerve-wracking putt of his career to the coolest...

Small businesses grapple with global tech outages created by CrowdStrike

NEW YORK (AP) — An owner of a consumer insights research firm couldn't pay her employees, make Friday's deadline...

Israel shoots down a missile fired from Yemen hours after a deadly Israeli strike on Houthi rebels

JERUSALEM (AP) — The Israeli military said it intercepted a missile fired from Yemen early Sunday, hours after...

UAE orders a trial of Bangladeshi nationals arrested for protesting their home government

DUBAI, United Arab Emirates (AP) — Authorities in the United Arab Emirates ordered an investigation and an...

Pope Francis calls for Olympic truce for countries at war, prays for peace

VATICAN CITY (AP) — Pope Francis on Sunday voiced his hope that the Paris Olympic and Paralympic Games will...

CNN Wire Staff

(CNN) -- Tropical Storm Isaac may not hit Haiti at hurricane strength, but that does little to assuage aid groups who fear another disaster in the vulnerable country.

Isaac is expected to whip the Caribbean nation with gale-force winds and stinging rain later Friday.

"Our experience in Haiti clearly indicates that it is not the storm or the winds, it's the rain that causes the problems," said Sinan Al-Najjar, the Red Cross' deputy country representative in Haiti. "When rain comes, landslides and flash floods do happen in Haiti. We are trying to focus on which are the flood areas, which are the risk areas."

Hundreds of thousands of people left homeless by the devastating 2010 earthquake continue to live in camps.

With floodwater comes the risk of another outbreak of cholera, an infection of the large intestine that causes severe diarrhea.

"After floods, it's going to be almost certain that we see increases in cholera cases," Al-Najjar said. "We already witnessed that with the few weeks of rain we had in April. We had spikes due to daily rain. If a flood comes, we know certainly cholera is going to be an issue."



A revised National Hurricane Center forecast map shows the eye of the storm slipping just south of the Dominican Republic on Friday morning before moving over or near Haiti later in the day. The neighboring nations share the island of Hispaniola.

As of 11 a.m. ET Friday, Isaac was 185 miles southeast of Port-au-Prince, Haiti's capital. It had maximum sustained winds of 60 mph, the hurricane center in Miami said.

The storm was moving west-northwest at 14 mph.

Rainfall accumulations of 8 to 12 inches are expected, with maximum amounts of 20 inches possible over Hispaniola.

"These rains could cause life-threatening flash floods and mudslides," forecasters warned.

Many of the Haitians living in camps had no idea that a storm was coming, CNN correspondent Gary Tuchman reported from Port-au-Prince. Not until a translator told them that Isaac was nearing did people in the streets know of the storm's approach or that the government had opened some shelters.

Residents of one tent community said they were staying put with their belongings and would ride out the storm.

There were no signs of hurricane preparations in Port-au-Prince.

"The risks are obvious in terms of flooding of low-lying areas," said Jean-Michel Vigreux, director for CARE International in Haiti.

Even though two-and-a-half years have passed since the earthquake, its impact on the country cannot be understated, he said.

Large amounts of rainfall will cause mudslides and runoff that can block roads, or worse.

"The country is still recovering from the earthquake. It's difficult to imagine that (a storm) will hurt the most vulnerable places again," Vigreux said.

The forecast map shows Isaac crossing the nation as a tropical storm with winds under 74 mph, probably in the 50 mph range.

"We watch those storms every single time they come near because Haiti is so vulnerable," said Amy Parodi, a spokeswoman for the Christian humanitarian organization World Vision.

The agency has met with the government in previous summers to discuss contingency plans for major storms, and pre-positioned relief items are available, she said.

The storm is expected to cross the eastern half of Cuba on Saturday, also as a tropical storm.

Isaac also poses a risk to the Republican National Convention in Tampa, Florida. Gov. Rick Scott said Thursday it will be up to organizers to decide the fate of the event.

While Isaac's path remains uncertain, the latest tracking information shows it crossing near the western Florida Keys and staying well west of Tampa, and not reaching hurricane strength until sometime Monday. A five-day projection shows Isaac making landfall near Pensacola, Florida, by early Wednesday.

Even though most of the state may catch a break, officials are taking the threat seriously.

"It has been a fortunate seven years since Wilma hit Florida," National Hurricane Center Director Rick Knabb said, referring to the last hurricane to make landfall in the state. "The luck is going to run out at some point."

There are no warnings or watches in the United States yet regarding Isaac, but there is a threat, and preparation is key, he said.

Since so many years have passed since Floridians experienced a hurricane, U.S. Rep. Debbie Wasserman Schultz said, there is a concern that residents may be complacent.

"Please don't wait until the last minute to prepare," she said. "If everyone is scrambling just before the storm, the lines will be very long and people will potentially put themselves in danger."

While the Republican convention will have the final say on any changes to the planned event, organizers are working with state and local officials to ensure that everyone has the same information, the governor said.

But Tampa is not the only part of Florida that could be hit, and Scott urged Floridians to be prepared.

"What everyone needs to do is to start tracking it, watch the weather, heed any warnings, get ready, get 72 hours' worth of supplies," he said.

Tampa Mayor Bob Buckhorn said his city is well-prepared for the 50,000 people headed there for the Republican National Convention, which starts Monday.

The Florida National Guard is ready to back up authorities around the state.

CNN's Gary Tuchman, Nelson Quiones, Dave Alsup, Allison Brennan, Kevin Liptak, Jason Hanna, Brad Lendon, Dave Hennen, Sean Morris and Mariano Castillo contributed to this report.