08-09-2020  7:34 am   •   PDX and SEA Weather
ODOT I-205 toll home pg
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4

NORTHWEST NEWS

Portland Protests Persist with Some Flashes of Violence

Tear gas was used by police on protesters Wednesday for the first time since the U.S. agents pulled back their presence

Reimagine Oregon Issues Equity Demands, Gains Legislative Support

Coalition of Black-led and Black-focused organizations takes new approach to concrete change 

Oregon Criminal Justice Commission: Initiative Petition 44 Will Nearly Eliminate Racial Disparities for Drug Arrests, Convictions

The initiative would expand access to drug addiction treatment and recovery services, and decriminalize low-level drug possession.

Inslee, Culp Advance to November Ballot in Governor's Race

In early returns, with nearly 17% of the vote, Loren Culp, the police chief of Republic, had the largest share among 35 other candidates.

NEWS BRIEFS

Vote.org Holds #GoodTroublePledge Voter Registration Drive to Commemorate the 55th Anniversary of the Voting Rights Act

2020 VRA anniversary observance to honor the memory of voting rights activist and late-Congressman John Lewis (D-GA) ...

White Democrats in Congress Falling Short on Reparations Bill

Democracy in Color releases “The White List” showing 79% of democratic House members haven’t cosigned HR 40 despite popular...

New Rule by The U.S. Department of Education Would Misdirect $11M from Oregon Public Schools

U.S. Rep. Suzanne Bonamici, Sens. Ron Wyden and Jeff Merkley, and Reps. Peter DeFazio and Earl Blumenauer called a...

Barbara Bush Foundation Partners with Barbershop Books and Penguin to Provide Child-Friendly Reading Spaces in Baltimore and Detroit Barbershops

Developed in Harlem, Barbershop Books is a community-based program that leverages the cultural significance of barbershops in...

All Classical Portland Awards Grant to Support Emmanuel Henreid's 'Livin' in the Light'

Livin’ in the Light documents Onry’s experience as a Black, male, professional opera and crossover singer in Portland, Ore. ...

For pandemic jobless, the only real certainty is uncertainty

CHICAGO (AP) — For three decades, Kelly Flint flourished as a corporate travel agent, sending everyone from business titans to oil riggers around the planet. Then came the worst pandemic in a century, leaving her jobless and marooned in an uncertain economy.Furloughed since March, Flint has...

For pandemic jobless, the only real certainty is uncertainty

CHICAGO (AP) — For three decades, Kelly Flint flourished as a corporate travel agent, sending everyone from business titans to oil riggers around the planet. Then came the worst pandemic in a century, leaving her jobless and marooned in an uncertain economy.Furloughed since March, Flint has...

LSU adds Missouri, Vanderbilt in revamped SEC schedule

Defending Southeastern Conference and national champion LSU will host Missouri and visit Vanderbilt in its expanded Southeastern Conference schedule, while Alabama will visit Mizzou and host Kentucky in league play revised by the coronavirus pandemic. The league on Friday released two additional...

Missouri's Drinkwitz takes side in mask-or-no-mask debate

COLUMBIA, Mo. (AP) — Eli Drinkwitz has been the head coach at Missouri for just over seven months. He has yet to lead the Tigers onto the football field, much less win a game, yet his role in the community already has forced him to take some important stands.First, it was supporting his new...

OPINION

Da 5 Bloods and America Abroad

Even before I returned to the United States from my combat tour in Vietnam, I had decided that we were fighting an unjust war. ...

Falling Behind: COVID, Climate Change, and Chaos

Multiple Crises, Multiple Obstacles ...

Bill Deiz urges Oregonians to Defend their Constitutional Rights

Elements of federal police, sent in by our president, are nightly tormenting our citizens with tear gas, impact munitions, kidnappings and beatings, and other criminal acts, in order to suppress our rights of free speech and free assembly ...

The Power of Love

Powerful lessons for me today on forgiveness. ...

AFRICAN AMERICANS IN THE NEWS

Missouri town divided by move to change its 'Savages' mascot

SAVANNAH, Mo. (AP) — A nearly all-white northwest Missouri town is divided over an effort to change its high school's “Savages” mascot that depicts a Native American amid a nationwide movement calling for racial justice.The high school had a “Savannah Savages”...

Amid pandemic, future of many Catholic schools is in doubt

NEW YORK (AP) — As the new academic year arrives, school systems across the United States are struggling to cope with the COVID-19 pandemic. Roman Catholic educators have an extra challenge — trying to forestall a relentless wave of closures of their schools that has no end in...

Rajapaksa sworn in as PM in Sri Lanka, cementing family rule

COLOMBO, Sri Lanka (AP) — Sri Lanka’s former President Mahinda Rajapaksa was sworn in as the prime minister for the fourth time Sunday after his party secured a landslide victory in parliamentary elections that cemented his family's hold on power. Rajapaksa took oath before his...

ENTERTAINMENT

Q&A: Cineworld CEO on re-opening Regal theaters in U.S.

Regal movie theaters have been closed for almost five months in the U.S. due to the coronavirus pandemic, but they are gearing up to open on Aug. 21. And this time it might just stick. Exhibitors have postponed plans several times as cases spiked in various cities. Mooky Greidinger, the CEO of...

Eminent scholar of early U.S., Bernard Bailyn, dies at 97

NEW YORK (AP) — Bernard Bailyn, a Pulitzer Prize-winning historian and educator of lasting influence whose “The Ideological Origins of the American Revolution” transformed how many thought about the country’s formation, has died at 97.Bailyn's wife, Lotte, told The...

Lorenzo Soria, president of Golden Globes group, dies at 68

LOS ANGELES (AP) — Lorenzo Soria, president of the Hollywood Foreign Press Association and former editor of the Italian news weekly L’Espresso, died Friday, the association said. He was 68.Soria died peacefully at his Los Angeles home, the association said in a statement, lauding his...

U.S. & WORLD NEWS

Amid pandemic, future of many Catholic schools is in doubt

NEW YORK (AP) — As the new academic year arrives, school systems across the United States are struggling to...

Masks in class? Many questions as Germans go back to school

BERLIN (AP) — Masks during class, masks only in the halls, no masks at all. Distance when possible, no...

Trump orders encroach on Congress' powers, invite challenges

BEDMINSTER, N.J. (AP) — President Donald Trump has bypassed the nation's lawmakers as he claimed the...

Masks in class? Many questions as Germans go back to school

BERLIN (AP) — Masks during class, masks only in the halls, no masks at all. Distance when possible, no...

Belarus strongman president faces strong election challenge

MINSK, Belarus (AP) — Belarusians are voting on whether to grant their authoritarian president a sixth term...

New Zealand marks 100 days of virus elimination

WELLINGTON, New Zealand (AP) — New Zealand on Sunday marked 100 days since it stamped out the spread of the...

ODOT I-205 toll
McMenamins
Bill Mears CNN Supreme Court Producer

WASHINGTON (CNN) -- Appeals from seven detainees at the Guantanamo Bay military prison in Cuba, contesting their open-ended custody, were turned aside by the Supreme Court on Monday.

Without comment, the justices refused to take a fresh look at the "habeas" petitions by the suspected foreign enemy fighters and what rights they have to make their claims in federal court.

In the so-called Boumediene ruling in 2008, the high court said "enemy combatants" held overseas in U.S. military custody have a right to a "meaningful review" of their detention in the civilian legal justice system. It would force the government to present evidence and justify keeping the prisoners indefinitely, without charges.

But a federal appeals court in Washington has since refused to order the release of any detainee filing a habeas corpus writ, in some cases rejecting such orders from lower-court judges.

According to Pentagon figures, 169 foreign men are still at the Guantanamo facility, including five "high-value" suspected terrorists from the 9/11 attacks set to go on military trial.

"By refusing to hear these cases, and any Guantanamo cases since its 2008 Boumediene decision, the Court abandons the promise of its own ruling guaranteeing detainees a constitutional right to meaningful review of the legality of their detention," said Vincent Warren, executive director of the Center for Constitutional Rights, or CCR, which filed the appeals on behalf of the seven prisoners.

"For nearly 10 years, the Supreme Court's involvement has been essential in checking the excesses of Executive-Branch detainee policy and in clearing a path in the lower courts for justice for the detainees. The [Supreme] Court's refusal to get involved at this critical juncture permits the Court of Appeals to continue to rubber stamp the military's decision-making, undermining our constitutional system of separation of powers."

Among the detainees is Adnan Farhan Abdul Latif, a Yemeni national who has been at Guantanamo for a decade. A federal judge had ordered his release, but the appeals court subsequently concluded that he was "part of" the al Qaeda terror group and that the government could detain him indefinitely.

His lawyers say he went to Afghanistan and Pakistan for medical treatment for a head injury, but the U.S. military-- without revealing too many specifics publicly-- said he was there to train as a terrorist in a remote al Qaeda camp.

At issue were how federal courts should discern the reliability of intelligence reports gathered against individual prisoners, and how far those courts could second-guess the "presumption of regularity" by military interrogations used to gather the information. CCR and other human rights groups have complained the military's interrogation techniques have been too physically and mentally harsh, crossing often into torture, raising questions about the reliability and legitimacy of evidence later used to justify continued detention.

The Obama administration, like the Bush White House before, has repeatedly urged the high court to stay out of detainee issue, since the 2008 ruling.

The appellate court also overturned a previous order to release Hussain Almerfedi, saying even circumstantial evidence that he was a terrorist was enough to confine him.

In the Latif decision last October by the D.C. Circuit of the U.S. Court of Appeals, Judge Janice Rogers Brown, appointed to the court by President George W. Bush, criticized the 2008 Boumediene ruling as based upon "airy suppositions." She suggested the military remained in the best position to decide whether Guantanamo prisoners were being held properly and for how long.

But in dissent, Judge David Tatel, a Clinton appointee, said his colleagues on the D.C. Circuit had "moved the goal posts," calling the "game in the government's favor."

The high court gave no reason why it refused to get involved again in the detainee issue, which the prisoners' advocates said was their best chance to force another constitutional showdown raised by the seven men.

The Center for Constitutional Rights called on President Obama to release 87 Guantanamo detainees the military has determined no longer pose a national security threat to the United States.

The cases are Al-Bihani v. Obama (10-1383); Uthman v. Obama (11-413); Almerfedi v. Obama (11-683); Latif v. Obama (11-1027); Al-Kandari v. U.S. (11-1054); Al-Madhwani v. Obama (11-7020); and Alwi v. Obama (11-7700).

Jose Padilla case

In a separate case, the justices also declined to get involved in the appeal of a convicted terrorist -- an American citizen held for years as an enemy combatant.

Jose Padilla and his mother had sued, seeking to hold accountable former Bush administration officials for his solitary confinement in military custody. Among those accused was onetime Defense Secretary Donald Rumsfeld.

At issue was whether federal officials could be held legally responsible for the "torture" of a citizen on American soil.

Padilla was originally arrested a decade ago, accused of planning to set off radioactive "dirty bombs" in the United States.

The military had held the Chicago native for 3½ years as an enemy combatant, and he hadn't been charged in the alleged plot. That detention prompted Padilla in 2008 to file a lawsuit alleging that the administration's "unlawful" policies violated his constitutional rights as a U.S. citizen. He said he suffered severe physical and mental abuse during his years of isolation in military detention. Similar lawsuits against other officials have been dismissed by lower courts.

The Supreme Court in 2004 had heard Padilla's original appeal over his enemy combatant status, claiming he deserved a chance to contest his military detention on constitutional grounds.

He was arrested in May 2002 at Chicago's O'Hare International Airport as he returned from overseas, where he had been living. He was detained as a material witness in the investigation of the September 11, 2001, terrorist attacks.

President George W. Bush designated him an enemy combatant the following month and turned him over to the military. He was one of the few terrorism suspects designated by the United States as an enemy combatant since 9/11. Padilla was then held in a South Carolina naval brig before the government transferred him to civilian custody and brought criminal charges against him.

The Obama administration has since abandoned using the term "enemy combatant."

The current White House has been criticized for continuing many of the anti-terrorism policies of the Bush administration, including military prosecutions of high-value suspected terrorists held at the U.S. Navy base at Guantanamo Bay.

The case is Lebron v. Rumsfeld (11-1277).

 

Port of Seattle S King County Fund
image of Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19)
https://www.oregonclinic.com/
Calendar

Photo Gallery

Photos and slide shows of local events

MMT Albina

Kevin Saddler