07-09-2020  7:29 am   •   PDX and SEA Weather
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NORTHWEST NEWS

Oregon DOJ to Hold Listening Sessions on Institutional Racism; Leaders Wary

DOJ will hold 11 virtual listening sessions for underserved Oregonians.

Portland Black Community Frustrated as Violence Mars Protests

Black leaders condemn violence from small group of mostly-white activists as Rose City Justice suspends nightly marches

Protester Dies After Car Hits Two on Closed Freeway

Summer Taylor, 24, of Seattle died and Taylor and Diaz Love of Portland were injured. The driver, Dawit Kelete has been arrested

Police Union Contract Extended, Bargaining to Continue

Negotiations will resume in January 2021.

NEWS BRIEFS

Portland Art Museum and Northwest Film Center Announce Artist Fund

The fund will help support artists during COVID crisis and beyond ...

The OHS Museum Reopens Saturday, July 11

The Oregon Historical Society museum will reopen with new hours and new safety protocols ...

Meyer Memorial Trust Announces New Trustee

Amy C. Tykeson of Bend, will oversee management of the 38-year-old Oregon-serving foundation. ...

African American Alliance for Home Ownership Announces New Board Member

AAAH has announced the appointment of Carl Anderson, M.D., a staff physician specializing in occupational medicine with Northwest...

Ploughshares Fund announces over $1 million in Grants to Stop Nuclear Threats

The global security foundation’s board of directors awards grants to 15 organizations working on nuclear weapons issues ...

Virus causes uncertainty for state lotteries

Boston (AP) — The coronavirus pandemic has been a rollercoaster for state lotteries across the country, with some getting a boost from the economic downturn and others scrambling to make up for revenue shortfalls.Since March, Texas, Arkansas and Montana and several other states have seen an...

Oregon Appeals Court affirms Portland renter relocation law

PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) — The Oregon Court of Appeals on Wednesday affirmed a Portland ordinance requiring landlords to pay tenants’ relocation fees if their rent is increased by at least 10% or if they’re evicted without cause.Presiding Judge Darleen Ortega said she agreed with a...

Iowa defensive back Jack Koerner hurt in jet ski accident

IOWA CITY, Iowa (AP) — Iowa defensive back Jack Koerner sustained serious injuries when he and a passenger on a jet ski collided with a boat on the Lake of the Ozarks in Missouri.According to a police report, Koerner and Cole Coffin were hurt at about 6:30 p.m. Friday when their watercraft...

Missouri football program pushes again for racial justice

COLUMBIA, Mo. (AP) — Ryan Walters had just arrived at the University of Missouri to coach safeties for the football program when a series of protests related to racial injustice led to the resignations of the system president and the chancellor of its flagship campus.The student-led movement...

OPINION

Recent Protests Show Need For More Government Collective Bargaining Transparency

Since taxpayers are ultimately responsible for funding government union contract agreements, they should be allowed to monitor the negotiation process ...

The Language of Vote Suppression

A specific kind of narrative framing is used to justify voter suppression methods and to cover up the racism that motivates their use. ...

Letter to the Community From Eckhart Tolle Foundation

The Eckhart Tolle Foundation is donating more than 250,000 dollars to organizations that are fighting racism ...

Editorial From the Publisher: Vote as Your Life Depends on It

The Republican-controlled Senate won’t pass the George Floyd Justice in Policing Act, no matter how hard Oregon’s senators and others work to push for change. ...

AFRICAN AMERICANS IN THE NEWS

Asian American girls saw pivotal icon in 'Baby-Sitters Club'

Author Ann M. Martin had no master plan when she decided to make one of the core members of “The Baby-Sitters Club” a Japanese American girl named Claudia.Claudia Kishi happened to be everything the “model minority” stereotype wasn't. She got bad grades. She thrived in...

Black Players for Change lead protest at MLS is Back tourney

Now that Major League Soccer has re-started, a group of Black Major League Soccer players is using the moment to call attention to systemic racism across sports and society. Black Players for Change was formerly the Black Players Coalition of MLS, but changed its name this week while joining forces...

Latino group launches M campaign to boost voter turnout

PHOENIX (AP) — A national organization is announcing a million campaign to turn out Hispanic voters in several of this year's battleground states.Mi Familia Vota, based in Phoenix, said it will spend million on get-out-the-vote measures and an additional million on digital and...

ENTERTAINMENT

With a satirical fictional memoir, Jim Carrey gets real

NEW YORK (AP) — When Jim Carrey and Dana Vachon handed in the book they had toiled on for eight years — a satirical “anti-memoir” about Carrey’s life but with increasingly extreme flights of absurdity — to Sonny Mehta, the late Knopf publisher said he would...

Country band Lady A files suit against singer with same name

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — Country group Lady A, which dropped the word “Antebellum,” from their name because of the word's ties to slavery, has filed a lawsuit against a Black singer who has performed as Lady A for years.The Grammy-winning vocal group filed the lawsuit on...

MSNBC appoints Joy Reid as Chris Matthews' replacement

NEW YORK (AP) — MSNBC says Joy Reid will move into the early evening time slot vacated in March by former “Hardball” host Chris Matthew's retirement in March.Reid, who has been a weekend anchor at the cable news network and lately has subbed in the 7 p.m. Eastern time slot, now...

U.S. & WORLD NEWS

Is it safe to visit the dentist during the pandemic?

Is it safe to visit the dentist during the COVID-19 pandemic?Dentists can’t eliminate all risk, but they...

Parades, close-ups with Mickey out as Disney World reopens

ORLANDO, Fla. (AP) — Forget about up-close “meet-and-greet" sessions with Mickey Mouse or Donald...

Bolsonaro now 'poster boy' for dubious COVID-19 treatment

RIO DE JANEIRO (AP) — After months of touting an unproven anti-malaria drug as a treatment for the new...

Morocco to start reopening borders after strict lockdown

RABAT, Morocco (AP) — Morocco will start gradually reopening its air and maritime borders next week after...

VIRUS DIARY: In Saudi Arabia, a photographer finds new focus

JIDDAH, Saudi Arabia (AP) — I moved to Saudi Arabia from Egypt last year, eager to photograph a national...

COVID-19 pandemic in Africa is now reaching 'full speed'

JOHANNESBURG (AP) — The COVID-19 pandemic in Africa is reaching “full speed,” the Africa...

McMenamins
Bill Mears CNN Supreme Court Producer

WASHINGTON (CNN) -- A war opponent's chance encounter with then-Vice President Dick Cheney -- which triggered an arrest and a lawsuit -- saw his appeal rejected by the Supreme Court Monday.

The case tested the balance between free speech and security concerns for top government officials.

The justices, by a unanimous vote, ruled in favor of two U.S. Secret Service agents, who remain shielded from a lawsuit filed by Steven Howards of Golden, Colorado. The man was arrested after confronting Cheney in a public area in 2006 -- making physical contact with the vice president -- and announcing his disagreement over the Iraqi war.

At issue was whether the agents deserved immunity as government employees. Believing there was probable cause, they detained the 59-year-old environmental consultant.

"This court has never recognized a First Amendment right to be free from a retaliatory arrest that is supported by probable cause," wrote Justice Clarence Thomas. "Nor was such a right otherwise clearly established at the time of Howards' arrest."

Howards claims his detention was in retaliation for his political views.

The incident occurred at Beaver Creek Mall in the Colorado mountain resort town of the same name. Howards was taking his 8-year-old son to a piano recital when he noticed Cheney coming out of a grocery store, accompanied by his security detail.

Howards used his cell phone to note the vice president was shaking hands with passers-by, and stated -- according to court records -- "I'm going to ask him (Cheney) how many kids he's killed today," an apparent reference to casualties in the Iraq conflict.

That remark was overheard by one of the agents. Howards let his son continue walking to the recital while he waited to speak with the vice president. The protester eventually told Cheney the administration's "policies in Iraq are disgusting," and then placed his open hand on Cheney's shoulder.

There is much dispute over whether that contact represented a "pat" as Howards later claimed, or a "shove" as some agents interpreted it. The touching alone did not lead to the man's immediate arrest, but he was later taken aside and questioned.

Howards at first refused to talk, then strongly denied touching Cheney. He also repeated his views on the war. "If you don't want other people sharing their opinions, you should have him (Cheney) avoid public places," he said, according to court records.

Agent Virgil "Gus" Reichle, who had been dispatched to do the questioning, became "visibly angry" at those remarks, according to the lower court ruling. He admitted later not overhearing the cell phone conversation -- nor witnessing the shoulder contact -- but said he had been briefed by fellow agents. Reichle was the detail's intelligence coordinator, and was dressed in plain clothes.

Howards was then arrested for assaulting the vice president, but he was never prosecuted for that or for a separate charge of harassment. He sued Reichle and another agent for alleged civil rights violations, and a federal appeals court in Denver tentatively allowed the case to proceed.

That three-judge panel said Howard's initial denial of the touching was sufficient reason -- or "probable cause" -- for agents to arrest him, but also concluded, on balance, the man's First Amendment rights were violated in the process.

The Justice Department urged the high court to reverse, saying protective details must often make lightning-fast judgments of life and death for top government officials. Those agents, said the Obama administration, should not err on the side of caution when handling potential threats for fear of being sued later.

The high court agreed. "An officer might bear animus toward the content of a suspect's speech," Thomas said. "But the officer may decide to arrest the suspect because the speech provides evidence of a crime or suggests a potential threat."

Justices Ruth Bader Ginsburg and Stephen Breyer agreed these Secret Service officials were not liable, but said other law enforcement agents in some cases may be held accountable for retaliatory arrests.

The justices five years ago ruled in a separate appeal that an individual claiming to have been prosecuted in retaliation for exercising his rights must show that government officials lacked probable cause when bringing criminal charges. The issue here was whether that rule applies to retaliatory arrests.

Justice Elena Kagan did not participate in this case, since she apparently worked on the government's legal strategy while serving as the Justice Department's solicitor general, before being nominated to the court in May 2010.

The case is Reichle v. Howards (11-262).

 

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