06-04-2020  10:46 am   •   PDX and SEA Weather
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NORTHWEST NEWS

More Protests in Portland, Mayor Signs Police Reform Pledge

More than 10,000 people demonstrated peacefully in Portland in one of the largest U.S. protests Tuesday

Black Leaders Call For Change in Policing, Change in Media Coverage of Demonstrations

The Albina Ministerial Alliance of Portland’s Coalition for Justice and Police Reform has a long history of working on a deep policy level to effect change in local law enforcement practices, often in response to police killings

Portland, Oregon, Remains Largely Peaceful, Curfew Lifted

Portland will not impose a curfew on Tuesday night for the first time in four days

Inslee Orders Statewide Guard Activation Following Unrest

Inslee had previously authorized 400 troops for Seattle and 200 troops for Bellevue.

NEWS BRIEFS

Civil Rights and Social Justice Organizations Call for a National Day of Mourning Today

At 12:45 p.m. PT today, the NAACP is asking for everyone to take a moment of silence for 8 minutes and 46 seconds. ...

ACLU Files Class Action Lawsuit Against Minneapolis Police for Attacking Journalists at Protests

The lawsuit’s lead plaintiff, Jared Goyette, a journalist covering the demonstrations, was shot in the face with a rubber bullet ...

Statement by AG Rosenblum on People of Color Caucus Recommendations

People of Color Caucus released policy recommendations yesterday pertaining to police accountability ...

An Important Message From Nataki Garrett

#BlackLivesMatter at OSF and we will not remain silent ...

Oregon Health Authority Investigating COVID-19 Increase at Unnamed Business

Oregon reports 71 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases today, no new deaths ...

Seattle mayor rescinds curfew as Floyd protests continue

SEATTLE (AP) — Leaders in Seattle seeking to address concerns raised by protesters abruptly ended a city-wide curfew in place for days amid massive demonstrations against the death of George Floyd while in police custody in Minnesota. Mayor Jenny Durkan said Wednesday evening on Twitter she...

Top health official: No virus surge since state reopening

PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) — Oregon hasn’t seen a coronavirus resurgence in the weeks since most counties began to slowly reopen businesses, the state’s top health official said Wednesday.Oregon Health Authority Director Patrick Allen spoke of declining hospitalizations and infection...

Kansas, Missouri renew Border War with 4-game football set

KANSAS CITY, Mo. (AP) — Kansas and Missouri are resuming their bitter Border War in football after the former Big 12 rivals agreed to a four-game series in which each school will play two home games beginning in September 2025.The fourth-longest rivalry in college football dates to 1891, but...

OPINION

Mayor Ted Wheeler: Portland and the Path Forward

Portland Mayor Ted Wheeler invites Portlanders, as public servants, to join him "in insisting that we never return to business as usual." ...

Local Business Leaders Share Messages of Hope

President, CEO of SAIF says each of us must move forward in "our understanding of the problem, in holding ourselves accountable for our own attitudes and biases, and in coming together, not apart." ...

Time to Stop Messing Around and Strike at the Root of Police Violence

Thomas Knapp says the root of police violence is the creation of "police forces" as state institutions separate from the populace and dedicated to suppressing that populace on command ...

A Letter to George Floyd: (Posthumous)

As Black mothers, so often we say, our Black boys across this nation belong to all of us. ...

AFRICAN AMERICANS IN THE NEWS

After protests, iconic Lee statue in Virginia to be removed

RICHMOND, Va. (AP) — A towering statue of Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee will be removed as soon as possible from Richmond's Monument Avenue, Virginia Gov. Ralph Northam said Thursday, pledging the state will no longer “preach a false version of history.” The bronze equestrian...

Ill-considered posts lead to lost jobs amid protests, crisis

LOS ANGELES (AP) — A writer from a “Law & Order" spin-off and the play-by-play broadcaster for the NBA’s Sacramento Kings found themselves out of jobs after making social media posts this week that their bosses found too incendiary or insensitive, highlighting an apparent...

Prosecutors describe racist slur as Ahmaud Arbery lay dying

BRUNSWICK, Ga. (AP) — A state investigator alleged Thursday that a white man was heard saying a racist slur as he stood over Ahmaud Arbery's body, moments after killing him with three shots from a pump-action shotgun. The lead Georgia Bureau of Investigation agent in the case testified that...

ENTERTAINMENT

'Splash,' 'Stern' writer Bruce Jay Friedman dead at 90

NEW YORK (AP) — Bruce Jay Friedman, an Oscar-nominated screenplay writer and popular playwright and author known for the wry comedy and subtle pathos of such novels as “Stern” and “About Harry Towns” and for his scripts for “Splash” and “Stir...

With 'Succession' shut down, Brian Cox takes on other roles

LONDON (AP) — “Succession” may be temporarily shut down, but star Brian Cox is still finding projects to keep him busy. Not that he's a fan of being an actor working from home.Cox recently filmed “Little Room,” a “whodunnit” for the Zoom age. The...

Lin Miranda doc postponed out of solidarity with protesters

NEW YORK (AP) — Just two days before it was to begin streaming, “We Are Freestyle Love Supreme," a documentary about the hip-hop improv group with Lin-Manuel Miranda and friends, has postponed its release out of solidarity with protesters. The group announced the postponement...

U.S. & WORLD NEWS

Farm-to-table dining takes on new meaning amid pandemic

PORTLAND, Maine (AP) — Eric Pray is used to shipping seafood all over the country. But since the...

Ill-considered posts lead to lost jobs amid protests, crisis

LOS ANGELES (AP) — A writer from a “Law & Order" spin-off and the play-by-play broadcaster for...

Hong Kong marks Tiananmen anniversary, defying a police ban

HONG KONG (AP) — Thousands of people in Hong Kong defied a police ban Thursday evening, breaking through...

Turkey strips 3 legislators of seats, setting off protest

ANKARA, Turkey (AP) — Turkey’s parliament on Thursday stripped three opposition party deputies of...

Landslide in Arctic Norway sweeps away 8 homes

COPENHAGEN, Denmark (AP) — Jan Egil Bakkedal had just prepared himself a sandwich when he heard a huge...

Prince Charles misses hugging his family amid virus lockdown

LONDON (AP) — Prince Charles says he has missed giving his family members a hug during the long weeks of...

McMenamins
Terry Collins the Associated Press

OAKLAND, Calif. (AP) -- Thousands of protesters in New York demanded an end to income inequality and housing foreclosures. Police fired tear gas to disperse marchers in Oakland, Calif. And black-clad demonstrators smashed windows in Seattle and occupied a building owned by the Catholic archdiocese in San Francisco.



Activists across the U.S. joined in worldwide May Day protests Tuesday, with anti-Wall Street demonstrators leading the way in some cities as they tried to recapture the enthusiasm that propelled their movement last fall.

While some protesters clashed with police, the melees were far less violent than ones that erupted last fall when the movement was at its peak. There were no major disruptions, though arrests were reported - including dozens in the San Francisco Bay area.

Many of the rallies, which drew activists pushing a variety of causes, also did not have the same drawing power that gatherings had last year for the Occupy movement or a half-dozen years ago for May Day rallies for immigration reform.

In recent years, activists in the U.S. used May Day to hold rallies for immigrant rights, but the day has been associated for more than a century with workers' rights and the labor movement both in the U.S. and elsewhere.

Across the world on Tuesday, protests drew tens of thousands of demonstrators into the streets from the Philippines to Spain. They demanded everything from wage increases to an end to cuts in education, health care and other austerity measures.

The U.S. protests were the most visible organizing effort by anti-Wall Street groups since the movement's encampments were dismantled last fall.

The major developments include:

- In Oakland, the scene of several violent clashes between activists and police during last fall's Occupy-inspired protests, the situation threatened to boil over again when police fired tear gas, sending hundreds of demonstrators scrambling.

Officers also fired "flash-bang" grenades to disperse protesters converging on police as they wrestled people to the ground while trying to make arrests, and used more tear gas on Tuesday night to break up the bottle-throwing remnants of what had been a peaceful rally of several thousand.

At least 25 people were taken into custody during the course of the day, including one for setting a police car on fire, police said.

Earlier, some protesters tried to force businesses to shut down for not observing calls for a "general strike."

- In Seattle, black-clad protesters used sticks to smash store windows and ran through the streets disrupting traffic. Police have made at least eight arrests.

While much smaller in scale, the mayhem was reminiscent of the 1999 World Trade Organization protests in the city that caused widespread damage to stores and forced the cancellation of some WTO events.

Authorities said many of the most violent protesters were trying to hide in the larger crowd by shedding their all-black clothes after they used items such as rocks, hammers and tire irons to damage property.

- In New York, hundreds of Occupy Wall Street protesters and their supporters spilled out onto Fifth Avenue in a confrontation with police amid citywide protests, while thousands later gathered peacefully in Union Square.

The group had promised the day would mark a spring revival of their movement.

Occupy organizer Mark Bray said the mood had changed since the group's first organized events late last year. "There was a sense of novelty to Occupy in October," he said. "Today is more celebratory, and nostalgic."

Marchers briefly flooded the avenue and blocked traffic before police in riot gear pushed them back onto the sidewalks. The group chanted: "We are the people. We are united!"

- In San Francisco, about 200 people took over a vacant building that is owned by the local archdiocese and has been targeted for previous protests. Two men on adjacent rooftops lobbed pipes and bricks at a line of police officers.

About two dozen protesters were taken into custody as police officers in riot gear cleared the building Wednesday, KGO-TV reported.

Police Chief Greg Suhr told reporters he assumed some of the people inside the building were part of a group that vandalized shops, cars and a police station during a pre-May Day demonstration Monday night.

- In Chicago, about 2,000 activists marched through the city to demand immigration reform and greater protections for workers. The demonstration was largely peaceful. Half a million people rallied in Chicago in 2006 to demand immigration reform. But numbers since have plummeted to just a few thousand.

- In Los Angeles, a group that broke off from a downtown rally for immigration reform briefly skirmished with police and left an officer injured, and 10 union demonstrators were arrested for blocking an intersection near Los Angeles International airport.

The downtown splinter group of several dozen protesters surrounded a small group of police in a tense standoff. Police Cmdr. Andrew Smith told KNBC-TV that an officer was hit in the helmet by a skateboard, but she was in good condition at a hospital.

- In Atlanta, about 100 people rallied outside the state Capitol, where a law targeting illegal immigration was passed last year. They called for equal rights for all workers and an end to local-federal partnerships to enforce immigration law.

The rally was significantly smaller than last year's, which drew about 1,000 people. Organizers said turnout last year was greater, in part, because the protest was on a Sunday, rather than during the work week.

"I'm a bit disappointed, but I think this is something to be expected," said Adelina Nicholls, executive director of the Georgia Latino Alliance for Human Rights, one of the main organizers of the rally.

"It's very difficult to keep a high level of excitement going," Nicholls said. "But it's not only about mobilization. It's also about organization, and we have people working every day to promote immigrant rights."

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Contributing to this report were Associated Press photographer Eric Risberg in Oakland, and AP writers Samantha Gross, Colleen Long and Verena Dobnik in New York, Christina Hoag in Los Angeles, Peter Prengaman and Kate Brumback in Atlanta, Doug Glass in Minneapolis and Sophia Tareen in Chicago.

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