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NORTHWEST NEWS

Vote by May 19: Oregon’s Primary Election Continues as Planned

Oregon’s vote-by-mail system keeps May Primary on schedule

A Black Woman Is Leading The Charge To Create A Vaccine For The Coronavirus

Dr. Kizzmekia Corbett and her team have begun running the first human trials of the vaccine in Seattle

Make a Mask & Support a Whole Community

Cascadia will be coordinating a mask donation project for community members who are willing to get out their sewing machines and create homemade masks

Federal Coronavirus Stimulus Package Covers 7 Major Areas

Oregon State Senator James I. Manning Jr. has provided a summary of what the Federal Coronavirus Stimulus Package looks like

NEWS BRIEFS

Waterfront Blues Festival Cancelled for 2020

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NAACP Calls COVID-19 Stimulus Package a Necessary Step, but Calls Upon Congress to Do More

The NAACP says in providing future relief, Congress must prioritize people first, not corporations ...

CARES Act Must Prioritize Nation’s Most Vulnerable Communities

The Lawyers’ Committee for Civil Rights Under Law says the new bill puts the interests of corporations above the burdens faced by...

33 Attorneys General Warn Amazon, Facebook, Ebay, Craigslist: You Aren’t Exempt from Price Gouging Laws

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OHSU Hotline to Answer COVID-19 Questions

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Idaho rifle club members qualify for Junior Olympics

MERIDIAN, Idaho (AP) — The difference between winning and losing a championship in the extremely precise world of air rifle is down to a few thousandths of an inch. At the Meridian Optimist Junior Rifle Club, a number of teenagers are pushing their limits and taking their skills to national...

Suspicious substance found in Coffee Creek prison mail

WILSONVILLE, Ore. (AP) — An administration building at an Oregon prison was evacuated Friday when workers found an envelope in the mail room with an unknown substance inside. The mail room at the Coffee Creek Correctional Facility in Wilsonville was secured after the envelope was found...

The Latest: 2 Madison Square Garden boxing cards called off

The Latest on the coronavirus outbreak's affect on sports around the globe (all times EDT):10 p.m.Two boxing cards at Madison Square Garden have been called off because of the coronavirus outbreak.A few hours after announcing the fights would proceed without crowds, promoter Bob Arum said Thursday...

Former AD, All-American center Dick Tamburo dies at 90

EAST LANSING, Mich. (AP) — Dick Tamburo, an athletic director at three major schools and an All-American center at Michigan State, has died. He was 90.Michigan State announced that Tamburo died Monday.A native of New Kensington, Pennsylvania, Tamburo served as the athletic director at Texas...

OPINION

The ACA Has Never Been More Critical

Today I'm honoring the 10th anniversary of the Affordable Care Act being signed into law. ...

NAACP/Black Community: A Model for Resiliency

As America enters perhaps the most uncertain period in modern history, we will all be tested in new and unpredictable ways. ...

What the Government Can Do Now to Lessen the Impact of COVID-19

Dr. Roger Stark says during this pandemic the administration must give states more flexibility ...

The Homelessness Crisis – We Are Better Than This

Julianne Malveaux says this is not just about homelessness. It is about an economic crisis that has made affordable housing, jobs and economic security difficult to obtain ...

AFRICAN AMERICANS IN THE NEWS

Joseph Lowery, civil rights leader and MLK aide, dies at 98

ATLANTA (AP) — The Rev. Joseph E. Lowery fought to end segregation, lived to see the election of the country’s first black president and echoed the call for “justice to roll down like waters and righteousness like a mighty stream” in America.For more than four decades...

Civil rights leader, MLK aide Joseph Lowery dies at 98

ATLANTA (AP) — The Rev. Joseph E. Lowery, a veteran civil rights leader who helped the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. found the Southern Christian Leadership Conference and fought against racial discrimination, died Friday, a family statement said. He was 98.A charismatic and fiery preacher,...

The Latest: Singapore penalizing social distancing violators

The Latest on the coronavirus pandemic. The new coronavirus causes mild or moderate symptoms for most people, but for some, especially older adults and people with existing health problems, it can cause more severe illness or death.TOP OF THE HOUR:— U.S. leads the world in confirmed...

ENTERTAINMENT

Review: In 'Uncorked,' a full-bodied coming-of-age tale

The wine movie is not exactly known for a bouquet of tasting notes. From “Wine Country” to “Bottle Shock,” they are usually light, amiable movies that amble through sunny fields of vines. “Sideways,” of course, is the choice vintage, but most come and go...

Country singer Joe Diffie tests positive for coronavirus

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — A publicist for Joe Diffie says the country singer has tested positive for COVID-19.Scott Adkins released a statement to The Associated Press from Diffie that said he is under the care of medical professionals and is receiving treatment.“My family and I are...

Stars of 'Contagion' reunite for a PSA

NEW YORK (AP) — The stars of the 2011 virus thriller “Contagion” — a prescient film these days — have reunited for a series of public service announcements to warn about COVID-19.Matt Damon, Laurence Fishburne, Kate Winslet and Jennifer Ehle have teamed up with...

U.S. & WORLD NEWS

AP Week in Pictures, Global

MARCH 21 - 27, 2020This photo gallery highlights some of the most compelling images made or published by...

Australia prepares to fly cruise passengers to Germany

SYDNEY (AP) — Australian authorities pressed ahead Saturday with plans to fly 800 cruise ship passengers to...

With virus, cherished Mideast traditions come to abrupt halt

BAGHDAD (AP) — Under the sign “Take out only” and a tall bottle of antiseptic by his side,...

Italy hopes virus is easing but fears new onslaught in south

ROME (AP) — Doctors and nurses in Italy's overwhelmed northern hospitals have welcomed a slight stabilizing...

Indian authorities send buses to take unemployed to villages

NEW DELHI (AP) — Authorities sent a fleet of buses to the outskirts of India's capital on Saturday to meet...

British Prime Minister Johnson tests positive for virus

LONDON (AP) — British Prime Minister Boris Johnson has tested positive for the new coronavirus, the first...

McMenamins
Curt Anderson AP Legal Affairs Writer

MIAMI (AP) -- The news media are taking on an increasingly police-like role in the Trayvon Martin slaying by using modern forensic techniques to analyze evidence, an approach some legal experts say can lead to a distorted view of the case because a lot of the key evidence is still under wraps.

The public has been whipsawed back and forth as new revelations emerge, appearing to support one version or the other.

Most recently, the Orlando Sentinel had a voice analysis expert examine a 911 call in which a person is heard screaming for help before the fatal gunshot. The shooter, neighborhood watch volunteer George Zimmerman, told police he was yelling, but the expert told the newspaper the voice most likely was not Zimmerman.

"It would be nice to know who was doing the calling for help, but identifying the caller is not necessarily going to definitively identify the wrongdoer," said University of Florida law professor Bob Dekle, a former state prosecutor and public defender. "Situations sometimes arise where it is the wrongdoer calling for help."

ABC News on Monday aired what it said was an enhanced version of a police video taken the night of the shooting that appeared to show wounds or welts on the back of Zimmerman's head. The initial, grainier video aired last week seemed to show no wounds or blood, which led Martin's family and supporters to proclaim that it undercut Zimmerman's story.

Legal and forensic experts cautioned that none of the media-led investigations, which are done in many high-profile cases, has been conclusive.

"The public needs to know that this is a very complex case," said Ron Martinelli, a forensics consultant in Temecula, Calif. "There are many issues that come into play and sometimes come into conflict."

Zimmerman told police that he was attacked by Martin on Feb. 26 and believed he had no choice but to fire his gun at Martin in self-defense. The teenager's family believes Zimmerman, 28, singled Martin out as suspicious because he was black. Zimmerman's father is white and his mother is Hispanic.

The family also said Zimmerman should've listened to a police dispatcher who told him not to follow Martin.

The 911 call analysis compared the screams of "Help" to other recordings of Zimmerman's voice using a computerized matching technique. The consultant, Tom Owen, told the Sentinel that the comparison showed a 48 percent match between the two samples. A positive match should be above 90 percent, he said. Owen did not respond to an email Monday seeking additional comment.

If Zimmerman is charged and the case goes to court, the defense would likely hire experts to punch holes in any conclusions about the 911 tape or the police video.

"The other side will have experts saying `you can't make anything out of this, it's all garbled, look how much they had to enhance it,'" said Robert Jarvis, a law professor at Nova Southeastern University. "What has been done with the tape? Has anybody tampered with it?"

News organizations also used audio technology to enhance a 911 call in which some reported that Zimmerman muttered a racial epithet under his breath. Other media organizations, including The Associated Press, said the raw recording was not clear enough to determine what Zimmerman actually said.

Experts have also said that photos initially released of Martin and Zimmerman could have skewed initial public perceptions.

Most of the photos of Martin show a baby-faced boy in a red T-shirt or football uniform, much younger than the tall teenager he was the night of the shooting. And Zimmerman no longer resembles the beefy-looking figure pictured in a mug shot from several years ago.

Special prosecutor Angela Corey has been appointed by Gov. Rick Scott to lead the investigation after Sanford officials declined to make an arrest. The Justice Department and FBI are also investigating.

Much still is not known about the evidence being weighed by prosecutors, including:

-The autopsy on Martin's body, which could show signs of a fight and whether the bullet entry wound supports Zimmerman's claims.

-Medical records of treatment Zimmerman received on the scene that night by paramedics, which again could back up or disprove his self-defense assertion.

-Police photographs, notes and other physical evidence probably collected at the scene.

-Videotaped interviews police conducted with Zimmerman.

-Whether there is other surveillance video of Martin or Zimmerman at any point during the evening, including the youth's visit to a convenience store shortly before the confrontation.

-Whether any witnesses saw the actual shooting and the circumstances leading up to it, including the alleged fight.

Many of these unanswered questions, especially the forensic results, will provide a more complete picture of how Zimmerman came to shoot Martin that night, Martinelli said.

"The decedent gets to have a voice only through forensics," he said. "That's how people speak from the dead."

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Follow Curt Anderson on Twitter: http://twitter.com/Miamicurt

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