04-10-2020  11:17 am   •   PDX Weather    •   SEA weather  
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4

NORTHWEST NEWS

Four Candidates Run for Rare Open Bench on Multnomah County Circuit Court

Judge Gregory F. Silver will retire before the end of his term. 

Oregon Schools Closed Through Academic Year Due to Virus

Oregon has had more than 1,200 confirmed cases of the coronavirus and 38 deaths, according to the Oregon Health Authority

Oregon Inmates Sue Over COVID-19 Response

The suit asks a judge to mandate a social distance of 6 feet or more between inmates

Oregon Health Officer: Spike in Virus Cases Can Be Averted

Modeling shows the state won't see a huge rise in cases as long as stay-at-home orders are heeded

NEWS BRIEFS

Civil Rights Groups Oppose the Department of Labor Suspending Affirmative Action Regulations for Federal Contractors

A broad coalition of civil rights groups sent a letter to the to the U.S. Department of Labor’s Office of Federal Contract...

New Tool to “Check Your Risk for COVID-19’’ Live in Portland Region

The tool offers an online checklist to help people decide if their symptoms and health conditions are serious enough that they should...

CDC Recommends Face Covering — Even in Parks, Outdoors

World Health Organization has switched from “social distancing" to the more accurate “physical distancing” ...

Portland Parks & Recreation Urges Social Distancing, Other Health Directives to be Followed

Achieving 6 feet of social distancing is extremely challenging at playgrounds, skate parks, and sports courts and fields, and those...

Texas Governor Unlawfully Exceeded Authority With Executive Order Limiting Jail Releases, Argues New Lawsuit

Lawsuit says governor’s order restricting releases exceeds his constitutional authority; public health experts agree reducing...

Lack of business forces Portland clinics to cut staff

PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) — Two large health care operations in Oregon are furloughing employees and cutting costs because of a lack of revenue due to the coronavirus outbreak, furthering cuts to medical facilities in the state.The Oregonian/OregonLive reports the Oregon Clinic has furloughed...

Man charged with attempted murder after man shot in Salem

SALEM, Ore. (AP) — A 20-year-old Salem man has been charged with attempted murder in connection with a shooting at a northeast Salem apartment complex. Jonathan Jimenez-Miranda faces charges of second-degree attempted murder, first-degree assault, and unlawful use of a weapon, the Statesman...

The Latest: 2 Madison Square Garden boxing cards called off

The Latest on the coronavirus outbreak's affect on sports around the globe (all times EDT):10 p.m.Two boxing cards at Madison Square Garden have been called off because of the coronavirus outbreak.A few hours after announcing the fights would proceed without crowds, promoter Bob Arum said Thursday...

Former AD, All-American center Dick Tamburo dies at 90

EAST LANSING, Mich. (AP) — Dick Tamburo, an athletic director at three major schools and an All-American center at Michigan State, has died. He was 90.Michigan State announced that Tamburo died Monday.A native of New Kensington, Pennsylvania, Tamburo served as the athletic director at Texas...

OPINION

Communities in Crisis: An Argument for Raiford for Mayor

“Things need to change,” says Mayoral candidate Teressa Raiford. “Houselessness is a public safety and health crisis, but we aren’t doing anything to mend it.” ...

You're Pretty... For a Dark-Skinned Girl

Cloé Luv, an "unapologetically" dark-skinned Black woman tells her story ...

The ACA Has Never Been More Critical

Today I'm honoring the 10th anniversary of the Affordable Care Act being signed into law. ...

NAACP/Black Community: A Model for Resiliency

As America enters perhaps the most uncertain period in modern history, we will all be tested in new and unpredictable ways. ...

AFRICAN AMERICANS IN THE NEWS

Mississippi court won't undo 12-year sentence for jail phone

JACKSON, Miss. (AP) — An attorney says he will ask the U.S. Supreme Court to overturn the 12-year prison sentence given to an African American man in Mississippi for carrying his mobile phone into a jail cell after he was arrested on a misdemeanor charge.The Mississippi Supreme Court said...

Joe Biden's next big decision: Choosing a running mate

Joe Biden faces the most important decision of his five-decade political career: choosing a vice president.The presumptive Democratic presidential nominee expects to name a committee to vet potential running mates next week, according to three Democrats with knowledge of the situation who spoke on...

What you need to know today about the virus outbreak

A staggering 16.8 million Americans have been thrown onto the unemployment rolls in just three weeks, underscoring the terrifying speed with which the coronavirus outbreak has brought world economies to a near standstill.Meanwhile, residents in Wuhan, China, t he city where the coronavirus pandemic...

ENTERTAINMENT

Issa Rae balances busy, booked career as 'Insecure' returns

NEW YORK (AP) — The HBO hit “Insecure” typically airs during the summer, but series creator Issa Rae has been moving like the Energizer Bunny with a schedule so booked and busy, the show’s return had to be delayed.But for good reason.She filmed two movies ("The...

Devils defenseman P.K. Subban is host of new NHL trivia show

Tired of sitting around the house and watching reruns on television every day?Too much Harry Potter? Monk? Grey's Anatomy? NCIS or one of the spinoffs?Here's something different.New Jersey Devils defenseman P.K. Subban and the NHL are bringing something new to television Saturday for fans and...

Review: In 'Tigertail,' an intergenerational immigrant tale

Oh, to be the other “Tiger” on Netflix. Alan Yang's “Tigertail” is either blessed to arrive in the stormy wake of “Tiger King," or doomed to be the other “Tiger” title Netflix users accidentally select when they're looking for the tabloid story of a...

U.S. & WORLD NEWS

Preacher to Pope Francis: Virus reminds us we're all mortal

VATICAN CITY (AP) — In a sign of humble obedience, Pope Francis prostrated himself for a few minutes on the...

Israelis looking out for overworked healthcare professionals

RAANANA, Israel (AP) — While hunkering down at home and keeping three young children entertained in...

A conundrum for New Yorkers: Social distancing in the subway

NEW YORK (AP) — They let trains that look too crowded pass by. If they decide to board, they search for...

In Mexico, towns block themselves off because of coronavirus

MEXICO CITY (AP) — In Mexico, beach towns have begun blocking off roads — in some cases,...

Nurses weigh their principles vs safety in virus fight

Paramedics rushed another critical COVID-19 patient into the emergency room, and Chicago nurse Cynthia Riemer felt...

Fire, rioting breaks out at Siberia prison

MOSCOW (AP) — Russian officials said a large fire was blazing Friday at a prison in Siberia where inmates...

McMenamins
Eric Tucker the Associated Press

WASHINGTON (AP) -- As Yogananda Pittman and Monique Moore climbed the ranks of the U.S. Capitol Police, they encountered no top-level supervisors who looked like them. No black women, from the chief down to the captains, were represented in the upper management of the federal law enforcement agency responsible for protecting lawmakers and congressional buildings.

So it was more than a personal honor when the two became the first black women promoted to captain in the department, which in the past decade has been roiled by allegations from minority officers that they were passed over for promotions and subjected to racial intimidation and harassment.

"I just definitely think it lets them know that it's attainable," Pittman said, referring to younger black officers. "When you see someone who looks like yourself in the rank of captain and what have you, they know they can do it."

The promotions may seem a pedestrian milestone in the year 2012 but they carry symbolic significance for the agency. Accusations of racism within the department have been addressed at congressional hearings, raised in multiple lawsuits and drawn concern from the Congressional Black Caucus, whose members in 2003 said they were "incensed and embarrassed" by the alleged mistreatment

Sworn statements from black officers and a 2001 class-action lawsuit brought on behalf of more than 300 current and former officers paint an unflattering portrait of the department. Black officers complained of losing promotions and favorable assignments to less-qualified white officers and of being humiliated in public and harassed with racial epithets. One officer says he found a hangman's noose on a locker; another reported finding a swastika-like symbol. One black officer nicknamed Ike says a K-9 unit dog was given the same name.

That lawsuit is pending after being revived by a federal appeals court in 2009. Other cases have been filed in the past decade, including just this year.

The Capitol Police has challenged at least some of the claims in court papers, denying that race played a role in the promotional process.

Police departments have generally been slow to promote black women - partly because of promotional exams often alleged to be discriminatory and more likely to produce higher scores among white test-takers - even at a time when black men are increasingly in upper management, said Christine Cole, a criminal justice policy expert at Harvard's John F. Kennedy School of Government.

"I don't believe that we have an equally diverse command staff even though we have large and growing numbers of African-American men who have made their way to the title of chief," she said.

The promotions show the department is making progress, though it remains an "evolving organization," said Deborah Lewis, the department's diversity officer. Nearly one-third of sworn Capitol Police officers are black, and just more than 8 percent are black women, Lewis said. Blacks make up roughly 43 percent of the department's civilian workforce, the agency says.

Of the department's 17 top leaders, two are black men and two are white women. The rest are white men, Lewis said. That pales next to the D.C. police department, which has a female police chief, black assistant chiefs and female black commanders.

"Great strides have been made to develop a climate of openness," Lewis said. A third-party contractor, for instance, now oversees the promotion process.

Joseph Gebhardt, one of the lawyers who brought the class-action case, said in an email that the promotions were "completely out of character for the department" given its history and that the appointments can't fix the "decades-long injustice" black officers have experienced.

Sharon Blackmon-Malloy, a plaintiff and current vice president of the U.S. Capitol Black Police Association, said she was pleased by the promotions but considered them an overdue and incremental accomplishment.

"Although there have been some changes, small changes, the overall atmosphere of the department is not satisfactory," said Blackmon-Malloy, who says she was one of the first two black women promoted to lieutenant and has since retired. "Because if it was, why would we still have to file class-action lawsuits?"

Moore and Pittman say they haven't directly experienced discrimination but don't discount anyone else's claims.

"Even if I did experience that type of behavior from the department, I don't think that would have stopped me from my goals," Moore said.

The captains, who were promoted in January, will together oversee some 500 or so officers in the department, which responds to everything from suspicious packages to thefts from offices to drunken driving.

Pittman, who comes from a family with a military background, joined in 2001 and has served in varied capacities, including in the communications division. Moore had been hired a few years earlier, working initially as a civilian before becoming a sworn officer, where she helped keep congressional committee hearings safe.

The two have had their share of memorable experiences, including being on Capitol Hill during the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks. Pittman, a new recruit, was preparing to graduate from training; Moore, meanwhile, helped evacuate First Lady Laura Bush from a Senate office building, where she had been scheduled to testify about education.

"Mainly it just validated my line of work, basically, as far as protecting the community, the professional community and staff," Moore said. "Everything that we train for just kicked in at that moment."

The two envision higher ranks than captain.

"We both have our eyes on when we'll make chief," Pittman said.

---

Follow Eric Tucker on Twitter at http://www.twitter.com/etuckerAP

© 2012 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed. Learn more about our Privacy Policy and Terms of Use.

image of Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19)
Prosper Portland Relief
Calendar

Photo Gallery

Photos and slide shows of local events

The Skanner Photo Archives