08-18-2019  6:17 am   •   PDX Weather    •   SEA weather  
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NORTHWEST NEWS

At Least 13 Arrested During Far-Right Protests

Police said there were about 1,200 on the streets, but that number fell throughout the day. Six people suffered minor injuries

Six Arrests Send Message Ahead of Demonstrations

The Oath Keepers pull out but Patriot Prayer's Joey Gibson says: “we don't bend the knee; we show up ten-fold, one hundred-fold...Force them to arrest you for being peaceful."

Portland Mayor Decries Violence, Hatred Ahead of Rally

The mayor of Portland, Oregon, said Wednesday that people planning violence or espousing hatred at a weekend protest by right-wing groups in the liberal city "are not welcome here"

ACLU of Oregon to Sue ICE

Group sues after US citizen detained outside courthouse

NEWS BRIEFS

Study Finds Lack of Racial Diversity in Cancer Drug Clinical Trials

New research published this week in JAMA Oncology has found a lack of racial and ethnic diversity in clinical trials for cancer drugs ...

Portland Parks, Partners Host Charles Jordan Birthday Celebration

A celebration of the life of one of Portland’s most influential leaders, held at his namesake community center ...

Matt Dishman Community Center Annual Block Party

The event will feature free food, arts and crafts, family fun, live music and more ...

Sara Boone Sworn in as Fire Chief

Boone will be the first African American fire chief in the city’s history ...

Portland Holocaust and Genocide Curriculum Symposium

Oregon State University’s College of Education will host a symposium for educators who will soon be required to teach about the...

'Miracle house' in Ohio draws pilgrims amid sainthood push

CANTON, Ohio (AP) — Late in the summer of 1939, crowds of strangers started showing up at Rhoda Wise's house next to a city dump in Ohio after she let it be known that miracles were occurring in her room.Eight decades later, people still make pilgrimages to the wood frame bungalow at the...

Backers of rural dental care find something to smile about

AUGUSTA, Maine (AP) — It can be hard to keep smiles healthy in rural areas, where dentists are few and far between and residents often are poor and lack dental coverage. Efforts to remedy the problem have produced varying degrees of success.The biggest obstacle? Dentists.Dozens of countries,...

Ex-Clemson star Kelly Bryant takes over at QB for Missouri

COLUMBIA, Mo. (AP) — Barry Odom never seems stressed about the future, whether the Missouri coach is pondering tough sanctions handed down by the NCAA over a recruiting scandal or the fact that one of the most prolific passers in school history is now in the NFL.When it comes to the...

Missouri DE Williams pleads to misdemeanor, put on probation

COLUMBIA, Mo. (AP) — Missouri defensive end Tre Williams pleaded guilty to a misdemeanor and was sentenced to two years of unsupervised probation after prosecutors dropped a felony domestic assault charge.The Columbia Daily Tribune reports Williams pleaded guilty to peace disturbance and was...

OPINION

Avel Gordly's Statement in Advance of Aug. 17 Rally

'All we have on this planet is one another' ...

A National Crisis: Surging Hate Crimes and White Supremacists

Our history chronicles the range of hate crimes that have taken the lives of Latinos as well as Native Americans, Blacks, Jews, and the LGBTQ community ...

Calling Out Racism, White Supremacy and White Nationalism is More Vital Than Ever

Telling the truth, in its entirety, is the most objective stance any journalist can take on any subject ...

A Dog for Every Kind of Hunting: The Hound

The hound, in particular, is considered an all-purpose dog for every kind of hunting, on all types of terrain. ...

AFRICAN AMERICANS IN THE NEWS

Warren, Sanders get personal with young, black Christians

COLLEGE PARK, Ga. (AP) — Bernie Sanders and Elizabeth Warren framed their Democratic presidential bids in personal, faith-based terms Saturday before black millennial Christians who could help determine which candidate becomes the leading progressive alternative to former Vice President Joe...

Phoenix looks to be next big city with citizen police review

PHOENIX (AP) — Dozens of people, mostly African Americans, huddled around tables scattered across a church gymnasium on a recent evening, discussing past run-ins with Phoenix police officers and ways to hold them accountable.In a city still stinging from a video of officers pointing guns and...

The Latest: HK riot police deployed to chase down protesters

HONG KONG (AP) — The Latest on protests in Hong Kong (all times local):7:45 p.m.Hong Kong riot police have been deployed to chase down a group of pro-democracy protesters they say were assembling illegally after the end of a sanctioned protest march.The protesters had gathered outside a...

ENTERTAINMENT

Paule Marshall, novelist of diverse influences, dead at 90

NEW YORK (AP) — Paule Marshall, an exuberant and sharpened storyteller who in fiction such as "Daughters" and "Brown Girl, Brownstones" drew upon classic and vernacular literature and her mother's kitchen conversations to narrate the divides between blacks and whites, men and women and...

Latino actors, writers pen 'letter of solidarity' amid fears

ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — Actresses America Ferrera and Eva Longoria are leading a group of more than 150 writers, artists and leaders who have written a public "letter of solidarity" to U.S. Latinos after the mass shooting in El Paso, Texas, and an immigration raid in Mississippi.The letter,...

Eataly severs ties with Mario Batali amid misconduct scandal

NEW YORK (AP) — Chef Mario Batali, whose career crumbled amid sexual misconduct allegations, no longer owns a stake in Eataly, the Italian marketplaces he once heavily promoted.Chris Giglio, a spokesman for Eataly USA, told The Associated Press on Friday the company has purchased Batali's...

U.S. & WORLD NEWS

ESPN documentary shows Bleier's emotional return to Vietnam

Rocky Bleier thought he made peace with what happened in a rice paddy in Vietnam on Aug. 20, 1969.What the former...

Suburban voters are pressuring Republicans to act on guns

GILBERT, Ariz. (AP) — Following the news has grown stressful for Angela Tetschner, a 39-year-old nurse...

Portland 'ground zero' for protests between right, left-wing

PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) — Hundreds of far-right protesters and anti-fascist counter-demonstrators swarmed...

Russian opposition figure re-arrested upon jail release

MOSCOW (AP) — A prominent Russian opposition figure has been detained by police immediately after leaving a...

Italy's Salvini tells ship with 107 migrants to go to Spain

ROME (AP) — Seeking to end a humanitarian crisis, Spain says a Spanish rescue boat with 107 migrants in the...

Leaked UK memos warn of food, drug shortages in Brexit chaos

LONDON (AP) — Secret British government documents have warned of serious disruptions across the country in...

McMenamins
Meghan Barr the Associated Press

NEW YORK (AP) -- As spring approaches, Occupy Wall Street protesters who mostly hibernated all winter are beginning to stir with plans for renewed demonstrations six months after the movement was born.

The global protests against corporate excess and economic inequality are generally thought to have begun Sept. 17 when tents sprang up in a small granite plaza in lower Manhattan. The movement has lost steam in recent months, with media attention and donations dropping off as Occupy encampments across the country were dismantled, some by force.

On March 7, the finance accounting group in New York City reported that just about $119,000 remained in Occupy's bank account - the equivalent of about two weeks' worth of expenses.

The Occupy movement has influenced the national dialogue about economic equality, with the word "occupy" itself becoming part of the public lexicon. In his third State of the Union address, President Barack Obama issued a populist call for income equality that echoed the movement's message. But has anything really changed in the past six months?

Some achievements that can be connected to the efforts of the Occupy movement, and some plans for the near future:

WHAT GOT DONE

In Albany, N.Y., Occupy protesters dubbed Democratic Gov. Andrew Cuomo "Gov. 1 Percent" for his refusal since the 2010 campaign to agree to a millionaire tax, and because his major campaign financial support comes from corporate executives.

Cuomo tried to evict Occupy Albany from the park co-owned by the city and the state. But the Democratic mayor, Gerald Jennings, agreed to allow Occupy Albany to stay on the city-owned side. Local Democratic District Attorney David Soares also announced he wouldn't prosecute anyone for disorderly conduct at Occupy Albany who might be arrested by state police - who answer to Cuomo.

In a surprise, Cuomo reversed his position on the millionaire tax in December to avoid further cuts to schools and health care. Part of the $2 billion in revenue went to a modest but rare income tax cut of $200 to $400 for most middle class families. Cuomo refers to the millionaire tax as the biggest tax cut for the middle class in decades.

Democratic lawmakers attributed Cuomo's move in part to the Occupy protesters who had targeted him across the street from the Capitol for months and had begun demonstrating just outside his office.

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An Atlanta pastor, whose church struggled to pay its bills after its building was struck by a 2008 tornado, credits Occupy Atlanta with helping it to avoid foreclosure. The Rev. Dexter Johnson's church, the Higher Ground Empowerment Center, took out a loan to rebuild and has struggled to pay its mortgage in recent months.

Johnson said the bank had agreed to work with the church to help pay its mortgage after demonstrations by Occupy members. Demonstrators had set up a camp at the church in Atlanta's Vine City neighborhood, just west of downtown.

In January, Johnson learned his congregation would be allowed to stay in the building.

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In Rhode Island, Occupy Providence pushed for - and won - a temporary day center to serve the homeless during the winter. Protesters made the center's opening a condition of their departure from a public park downtown, where they had camped against the city's wishes for more than three months.

While the city didn't fund the center, officials pledged to help its operator, the Roman Catholic Diocese of Providence, find money for it.

"It shows that with pressure from people, a government can be made to move," protester Robert Malin said at the time of the center's opening.

The city had threatened legal action to remove the protesters and their tents from the park, but the two sides instead went into mediation before a judge.

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Also in Rhode Island, the state's junior U.S. senator, Sheldon Whitehouse, introduced a bill in November to crack down on high credit card interest rates - the same week he visited the Providence encampment. While there was no direct relationship between Occupy and the bill, Whitehouse spokesman Seth Larson said Thursday, the legislation no doubt resonated with the protesters.

"It was timely, and I'm sure the Occupy folks appreciated this bill," Larson said.

Whitehouse had introduced similar legislation a year earlier.

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Occupy protesters helped save an Iraq war veteran's home from foreclosure in Atlanta, the Huffington Post reported. "I strongly believe Occupy Atlanta accelerated the process and helped save my home," Brigitte Walker, whose home activists began occupying Dec. 6, told the website. "If it had not been for them standing up, I probably wouldn't be having this happy ending." Walker had left Iraq in May 2004 when she was injured by the shock from mortar rounds, the Post reported.

Occupy Minneapolis also worked with community organizers to help a former Marine who faced eviction from his home strike a deal with his bank, the Post reported.

WHAT'S NEXT

Occupiers in New York City will commemorate the six-month mark with a rally Saturday in Zuccotti Park, where protesters camped out for months until the city ousted them in November.

Organizers are hoping donations will start to flow in as protests begin anew this spring, including a global day of "economic disruption" on May 1.

And in some states, Occupy supporters are making forays into politics. Asher Platts is running for the state senate in Maine as a "Clean Elections" candidate. Platts, an activist who attended the protests last fall, is running on an Occupy platform.

In suburban Philadelphia, Occupy protester Nathan I. Kleinman is running a write-in campaign for Congress against four-term Rep. Allyson Schwartz in the Democratic primary on April 24. The 29-year-old said he never would have mounted a run without his Occupy experience. Kleinman withdrew from the ballot after a court hearing in which Schwartz's supporters questioned some of the 1,500 required signatures he had gathered to appear on the ballot.

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Contributing to this report were Associated Press writers Jeff Martin in Atlanta, Kathy Matheson in Philadelphia, Michael Gormley in Albany, N.Y., Erika Niedowski and David Klepper in Providence, R.I., and News Researcher Julie Reed in New York.

© 2012 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed. Learn more about our Privacy Policy and Terms of Use.

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